izmir escort izmir escort antalya escort porno jigolo izmir escort bursa escort alsancak escort bursa escort bursa escort gaziantep escort denizli escort izmir escort istanbul escort istanbul escort istanbul escort izmir escort 404 Not Found

404 Not Found

The resource requested could not be found on this server!
Powered By LiteSpeed Web Server
LiteSpeed Technologies is not responsible for administration and contents of this web site! Florida State Attorney Aramis Ayala - Page 6
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 51 to 59 of 59

Thread: Florida State Attorney Aramis Ayala

  1. #51
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    12,463
    Editorial:

    Aramis Ayala should resign or be removed from office


    By Brian Burgess
    The Capitolist

    In the hours after Florida’s Supreme Court ruled against anti-death-penalty activist Aramis Ayala on Thursday afternoon, the embattled state prosecutor announced a desperate ploy to try and save face: the formation of a special committee of seven assistant prosecutors who will have the ominous task of not only deciding how to prosecute first-degree murder cases, but also of trying to make sure their decision doesn’t offend Ayala’s personal sensibilities. In a statement, Ayala described the role of the panel this way:

    “With implementation of this panel, it is my expectation that going forward all first-degree murder cases that occur in my jurisdiction will remain in my office and be evaluated and prosecuted accordingly.”

    The names of the unlucky seven attorneys will be announced at a press conference Friday morning. The problem is, making those kinds of decisions is exactly why state prosecutors are elected and held accountable by voters. The seven assistant prosecutors she picks to lead her newly formed committee, as seasoned as they might be, will be forced to do her job for her. That is not what voters – and taxpayers – pay her for. To make matters worse, if this panel makes the decision not to seek the death penalty in a certain case, voters and taxpayers will be left wondering how much influence Ayala has over the panelists. After all, she’s their boss, and whose to say such a decision won’t have been made in an effort to curry favor with her?

    Aramis Ayala was elected to the position and it is her solemn duty carry it out, not to shirk her duty and expect underlings to pick up the slack. That’s not leadership. Imagine the furor if we had a governor telling his or her unelected deputy chiefs of staff to sign death warrants ordering the execution of a condemned man. Such an abdication of duty is not only offensive, it’s just plain disgusting.

    Ayala has tried to blame Governor Rick Scott for sticking his nose into her business, but after the Supreme Court ruling, her own remarks make her look foolish. In her own rejected argument to the court, Ayala wrote:

    “By inserting his personal politics into this case, Gov. Scott’s unprecedented action is dangerous and could compromise the prosecution of Markeith Loyd and threatens the integrity of Florida’s judicial system.”

    As it turns out, Supreme Court Justice Al Lawson, writing for the majority, made it clear it was her own personal politics that were the problem:

    “By effectively banning the death penalty in the Ninth Circuit — as opposed to making case-specific determinations as to whether the facts of each death-penalty eligible case justify seeking the death penalty — Ayala has exercised no discretion at all…Ayala’s blanket refusal to seek the death penalty in any eligible case, including a case that ‘absolutely deserve[s] [the] death penalty’ does not reflect an exercise of prosecutorial discretion; it embodies, at best, a misunderstanding of Florida law.”

    So here we not only have a prosecutor who (five Supreme Court Justices agree) doesn’t even understand Florida law, but who also refuses to do her duty. Instead, her solution is to force other people -none of them elected to do so – to carry out the dirty work for her.

    Ayala should resign honorably, or be removed dishonorably from her job by whatever legal means are available to the people of Florida.

    http://thecapitolist.com/aramis-ayal...d-from-office/
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    “There are some people who just do not deserve to live,”
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    “Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

  2. #52
    Administrator Moh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    11,717
    Opinion

    Florida’s Constitution is stronger than Aramis Ayala

    By Greg Jackson
    The Apopka Voice

    So here I sit, at my desk in a cramped office plugging away on a motion for summary judgment that will hopefully get my client out of a case that, in my opinion, should not have ever been filed. Instead of sitting here, however, I should be at a local watering hole celebrating with a snifter of Johnny Walker Blue Label, neat of course, and puffing on an Ashton Maduro. You see today is the day I can pound on my chest with pride and say “I told you so.” I, a product of public school, a connoisseur of boiled peanuts and FSU fan, outwitted some of the brightest legal minds when I said, “Governor Scott absolutely had the authority to remove Aramis Ayala from all death penalty cases in Orange and Osceola counties.” For those who may have missed that, allow me to set the proverbial stage.

    If you have not heard by now, in case number SC17-653, the matter of Aramis Donell Ayala, etc. v. Rick Scott, Governor, the Florida Supreme Court came back 5-to-2 in favor of Governor Scott. The ruling of the highest Court in our state confirms that Gov. Scott does indeed have the authority to take death penalty cases from Ms. Ayala after she said to the whole world that she would never seek the death penalty, even in cases that deserve such consideration. When I first heard Ms. Ayala’s blanket statement that sought to change death penalty law in Florida, I immediately went to the airwaves and stated unequivocally that Ms. Ayala was wrong. Supporters of Ms. Ayala and opponents of the death penalty attempted to engulf me in a hailstorm of opposition, but I endured. They said I was anti-female – which I am not. They said I was anti-Black – which is ridiculous because I am not. They said I was a Republican operative – which I am not, but would consider (just kidding). They said I was a Rick Scott fan – which I am not completely there, but I am still waiting for a reply from his office about my being appointed to a judgeship or something (wink, wink, nod). Supporters of Ms. Ayala said a lot of interesting things about me and my position, except the one thing that was true; they failed to mention that quite simply I read the Florida Constitution and Florida Statutes. Throughout the whole debacle as people challenged me and my position I stood firm on my interpretation of the Florida Constitution and Florida Statutes, and all but guaranteed folks that the Florida Supreme Court would come back in favor of Governor Scott.

    You see, instead of approaching this matter between Gov. Scott and Ms. Ayala as a Black-White, male-female, Democrat-Republican issue, I just simply read the words that outlined the role of the Governor and determined that while he may not necessarily have the authority or power to remove her from her elected office, he most certainly does have the authority to reassign her cases to another state attorney’s office since she refused to consider death penalty for any case that warranted such consideration. In a much more tactful way than I, the Florida Supreme Court said it best:

    “As Florida’s chief executive officer, the Governor is vested with the ‘supreme executive power’ and is charged with the duty to ‘take care that the laws be faithfully executed.’”

    In paraphrasing Chris Tucker in a comment he made to Jackie Chan in the blockbuster hit movie “Rush Hour,” the Governor (no matter who he or she is) is Michael Jackson and the State Attorneys (no matter who they are) are Tito, their respective derrieres (buttocks) belong to him. In other words, even though state attorneys are elected they fall under the executive branch of government in the State of Florida which places them under the authority of the Governor. It is shocking that none of the academic heavyweights, ivy-league educated, $1,000-an-hour lawyers working for Ms. Ayala figured this out. Instead, the academic heavyweights, ivy-league educated, $1,000-an-hour lawyers were taken to the woodshed by a couple of Florida Assistant Attorney Generals, like I was not too long ago, simply because they read the law as it was written, not in a way they wanted it to be read. Adding a bit of insult to injury to Ms. Ayala’s “Dream Team” of out of state, over-priced lawyers, the Florida Supreme Court further stated:

    “Thus, under Florida law, Ayala’s blanket refusal to seek the death penalty in any eligible case, including a case that “absolutely deserve[s] [the] death penalty” does not reflect an exercise of
    prosecutorial discretion; it embodies, at best, a misunderstanding of Florida law.”

    If I can digress for a moment, a lesson can be learned from this. I have pointed to an interpretation of Florida Statutes before and have been doubted (i.e., Chapter 163, Part III, Florida Community Redevelopment Act). In much the same way that I was able to see through the forest with the authority of the Governor, trust me, I have seen through the weeds on Chapter 163 as well. Much like the 1981 class action lawsuit against the City of Apopka, Dowdell v. The city of Apopka Florida, where the U.S. District Court found the disparate rendering of services provided to those living in “South Apopka,” I also see a disparate use of Apopka Community Redevelopment Agency funds, funds that are going to areas other than where they are most effective and needed – South Apopka. So, to get back on track, if my ability to interpret statutory provisions is what I proclaim it to be, I predict that soon I will be pounding
    my chest again and saying “I told you so” – in my humble opinion.

    To read the Florida Supreme Court’s opinion, go here.

    Greg Jackson is a former Assistant Attorney General for the State of Florida, a military veteran, current Orange County District 2 Representative on the Board of Zoning Adjustments, and General Counsel for the Community Redevelopment Agency. He has been as an active member of the Central Florida community for nearly 20 years. He was most recently a candidate for the Florida House District 45 seat.

    http://theapopkavoice.com/floridas-c...-aramis-ayala/

  3. #53
    Senior Member CnCP Legend CharlesMartel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    FRANCE
    Posts
    3,065
    State Attorney ends legal fight over death penalty

    Aramis Ayala dismisses federal lawsuit against governor

    By Mike DeForest
    clickorlando.com

    ORLANDO, Fla. - State Attorney Aramis Ayala has voluntarily dismissed a federal lawsuit she had previously filed against Gov. Rick Scott over his decision to reassign 30 potential death penalty cases from her office.

    Ayala originally filed the lawsuit in April, weeks after she announced her office would not seek the death penalty in any case.

    The federal lawsuit claimed that by "summarily removing Ayala from her position due to a disagreement over her prosecutorial discretion," the governor unconstitutionally deprived the "democratically elected" state attorney of her position.

    In a separate legal action, Ayala petitioned the Florida Supreme Court to review whether Scott had the authority under state law to transfer those murder cases Brad King, the state attorney in a neighboring judicial district.

    Last month, in a 5-2 opinion, the Florida Supreme Court ruled that Ayala's blanket prohibition against the death penalty provided the governor with "good and sufficient reason" to remove those cases from her office.

    Ayala did not challenge the Florida Supreme Court's decision within a 15-day deadline to request a rehearing, records show.

    On Sept. 14, a U.S. district judge granted Ayala's request to dismiss the simultaneous federal lawsuit.

    The state attorney did not explain in court papers why she chose to drop the litigation alleging violations of the U.S. Constitution.

    Following the Florida Supreme Court ruling, Ayala reversed her office's policy against the death penalty, announcing that she would seek capital punishment in murder cases if a panel of seven attorneys in her office unanimously agree it is warranted.

    Invoices show Ayala spent $378,314 of taxpayer money on her litigation against the governor, including expenses related to her now-dismissed federal lawsuit.

    In addition to hiring private attorneys based in Tampa and Washington D.C., a News 6 investigation revealed that Ayala paid $20,285 to Kivvit, a high-powered public relations firm.

    Ayala has repeatedly refused to explain what specific services Kivvit provided, only to say that the Washington, D.C., public relations firm conducted "litigation support."

    In July, after News 6 requested invoices Kivvit billed to Ayala's office, the state attorney provided heavily redacted copies of the public records. Large black boxes concealed many details on billing statements. Updated: 4:39 PM, September 26, 2017

    View Kivvit invoices, here.

    At the time, Ayala's office claimed the redacted information was exempt from release under Florida public records laws because it reflected her legal team's "mental impression, conclusion, litigation strategy or legal theory."

    After Ayala formally ended her litigation against the governor, News 6 once again requested un-redacted copies of the public relations firm invoices.

    Those newly released billing records reveal very little information about Ayala's legal strategy in her lawsuit against the governor.

    Likewise, the invoices do not provide many specific details about the services provided by the public relations firm at taxpayer expense.

    On March 29, Kivvit managing director Tracy Schmaler billed Ayala's office for two hours of work at a cost of $570.

    On the invoice activity report, Schmaler wrote, "Organized calendar for upcoming events and task; call with stakeholders and legal team; discussion on legal strategy."

    That same day, Schmaler received an email from one of Ayala's advisors asking the public relations specialist to craft a short statement that would be read to the state attorney's supporters who were attending a rally in Tallahassee, a News 6 investigation revealed.

    Ayala has repeatedly declined to discuss whether Schmaler drafted that message on her behalf, and if so, whether it was part of the PR firm's taxpayer-funded duties.

    Over a four-month period, Kivvit billed the state attorney's office for such tasks as "outreach to stakeholders", "researching and detailing case information on previous murder cases", "planning and discussions around amicus filings", and "(editing) litigation materials for legal team", invoices from the public relations firm show.

    "Enlisting outside consultants, like Ms. Schmaler, to assist in litigation is a common practice and courts across this country have long recognized the value of employing these kinds of litigation support experts," Ayala's attorney Roy Austin previously told News 6.

    https://www.clickorlando.com/news/in...-death-penalty
    Last edited by Helen; 09-27-2017 at 06:28 AM. Reason: fixed spacing, font, removed date & other bs..etc

  4. #54
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    12,463
    Ayala misses deadline to seek death penalty in Osceola homicide

    Case to be first Ayala would seek death in since legal battle with Gov. Scott

    By Emilee Speck
    clickorlando.com

    OSCEOLA COUNTY, Fla. - The Orange Osceola State Attorney’s Office missed the paperwork deadline to seek the death penalty for a woman accused of killing a 20-year-old man.

    The case would have been the first State Attorney Aramis Ayala said she would seek capital punishment in since making the controversial statements that she would not pursue the death penalty while in office for any cases.

    Emertia Mapp, 33, is accused of stabbing Zackery Ganoe to death April 10 at a Days Inn in Kissimmee. Mapp also faces attempted murder charges after another man was found with stab wounds at the scene.

    Mapps attorney filed a motion Wednesday to prevent the state from seeking death.

    After losing a court battle against Florida Gov. Rick Scott, who stripped dozens of cases from her office, Ayala said she would only pursue death in first-degree murder cases if her panel of assistant states attorneys unanimously agreed.

    Ayala's office had 45 days to file for the death penalty. Sources told News 6 that one of the seven death-penalty panel members was on vacation. It's unclear if that is the case of the missed deadline.

    "The decision to file the notice to seek death was made with the full knowledge and awareness that the 45 day time period had elapsed," Ayala said in a statement Friday. "Now that the defense has filed a proper motion we will litigate the issue and we feel confident that we will receive a favorable ruling."

    Scott had strong words for the state attorney after learning of the paperwork snafu.

    “It is absolutely outrageous that Aramis Ayala failed to seek justice in the case against Emerita Mapp who is accused of attacking multiple people and killing Zackery Ganoe," Scott said in a statement. "I have been clear that I stand with the victims of crime and their families and they deserve answers from the State Attorney’s Office on how this critical deadline was not met. I’ll continue to review reassigning cases from her office since she is failing to fight for victims and their families.”

    https://www.clickorlando.com/news/ay...ceola-homicide
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    “There are some people who just do not deserve to live,”
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    “Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

  5. #55
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    12,463
    ​Opinion:

    Aramis Ayala: Uncaring or Unqualified


    By Greg Jackson
    The Apopka Voice

    When the Orange-Osceola County State Attorney, Aramis Ayala, ran for a public office sworn to protect the interest of victims and families of violent crimes to include intentional killings, she should have made a gut-check to be certain that she was qualified enough, or at least caring enough, to serve the residents within the jurisdictions of her office who wanted death penalty to be considered when warranted.

    Well it seems that Ayala, after making the ridiculous statement that she would not seek the death penalty in any case, which prompted the Governor to step in and remove cases from her office, has made yet another misguided step in the wrong direction and shown that she could not care less about the families of victims of violent crimes in the Orange and Osceola regions she was elected to serve.

    The fact that Ayala embarrassed her office and wasted taxpayers’ dollars by hiring $1,000.00 per hour lawyers to represent her failed attempt to unilaterally ban death penalty cases in the Ninth Judicial District should have been a clear sign that something was wrong. The fact that Ayala thought her prosecutorial discretion could not be questioned or challenged by the Governor was pitiful.

    The fact that Ayala convened a hodge-podge cast of characters to pose as a Death Penalty Review Panel after a crushing defeat in a 5-2 ruling by the Florida Supreme Court in favor of Governor Scott’s authority to remove cases from Ayala’s office, should not have given anyone a false sense of hope that she had come to her senses.

    The fact that Ayala has been quiet as a church mouse on issues of importance to Orange and Osceola County residents should not have lulled any of us into a false sense of security.

    Unfortunately, a clear indication of Ayala’s uncaring or unqualified stance against families of persons murdered in the Ninth Judicial Circuit reared its ugly head again today when Ayala’s office — death penalty panel and all — inadvertently or purposefully, missed the deadline to file a petition for death penalty, where a murder was committed, by 22 days!

    You heard me correctly, the Ninth Judicial Circuit State Attorney missed a critical deadline by nearly a month, and in effect thwarted a family’s ability to seek all avenues of justice, to include the death penalty where it was clearly applicable.

    When I first spoke out against Ayala for her defiance against the authority of the Governor, folks thought I was being too hard on Ayala. When I told folks that the Florida Supreme Court would rule against Ayala and her $1,000.00 an hour lawyer, folks doubted me then also; but, in both instances I was right.

    So now, when I tell you that Ayala has neither the compassion or qualifications to do the job of State Attorney, I hope you understand that I say this not because I dislike Ms. Ayala, but because I promote justice.

    Victims and victims’ families deserve a State Attorney who will seek justice for them, just as much as she seeks justice for those who commit heinous crimes against humanity.

    This last show of defiance by Ayala against the Florida Statutes, Florida’s Governor, Florida’s Supreme Court and Florida families seeking justice for their murdered family members, is a clear sign that Aramis Ayala is uncaring and unqualified to serve as the State Attorney for the Ninth Judicial Circuit — in my humble opinion.

    http://theapopkavoice.com/aramis-aya...r-unqualified/
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    “There are some people who just do not deserve to live,”
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    “Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

  6. #56
    Administrator Moh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    11,717
    State Attorney Ayala says she knew death penalty deadline could be missed

    Defiant state attorney blames governor for late filing

    By Mike Holfeld
    WKMG

    ORLANDO, Fla. - Orange-Osceola State Attorney Aramis Ayala told a handful of reporters Monday afternoon that the missed filing deadline in the death penalty case of accused murderer Emerita Mapp was no mistake.

    “Of course I knew the potential of some of those cases passing the 45 days," Ayala said. "This is something the review panel discussed prior to reviewing cases.”

    Mapp was arraigned Aug. 23, yet the filing by the state attorney’s office missed the 45-day deadline by several weeks.

    According to Florida Statute. 775.082:

    “If the prosecutor intends to seek the death penalty, the prosecutor must give notice to the defendant and file the notice with the court within 45 days after arraignment. The notice must contain a list of the aggravating factors the state intends to prove and has reason to believe it can prove beyond a reasonable doubt.”

    Ayala said she already had researched and found precedent-setting cases that will be included in a motion that will be filed in several weeks.

    News 6 found that the statute does allow for “the prosecutor to amend the notice upon a showing of good cause” but there is no mention of an exception for a missed deadline.

    When asked why she didn’t file for an extension Ayala said, “ An extension for what?... The governor missed it. If you look at the timeline, it was the governor who said he was reviewing it, there was no obligation to review any.”

    State Rep. Bob Cortes, of District 30, told News 6 on Monday that Ayala “bungled her trial by fire."

    Cortes thinks the embattled state attorney should step down.

    Scott's office released a statement about Ayala's comments Monday evening.

    "It is outrageous State Attorney Ayala is attempting to pass the blame for her failure. Let’s be clear – State Attorney Ayala failed to meet this deadline and she alone is responsible for not fighting for justice for the victims in this case."

    The Supreme Court ruled in Governor Scott’s favor on August 31, 2017 giving State Attorney Ayala more than a month to file the appropriate notice by the October 7, 2017 deadline.

    "What possible excuse could there be for failing to do her job and missing a basic deadline on a case she is responsible for handling?,” deputy director of communications McKinley Lewis said.

    https://www.clickorlando.com/news/st...ould-be-missed

  7. #57
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    12,463
    'Negligence' or 'willful disregard,' Gov. Scott demands Ayala explain missed death penalty filing

    By WFTV News

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - Florida Gov. Rick Scott sent a letter Monday demanding information on why State Attorney Aramis Ayala missed the deadline to file a motion to seek the death penalty in a Kissimmee murder case.

    Scott has removed numerous death penalty cases from Ayala after she announced her office would not seek the death penalty in any case her office prosecutes.

    She took Scott to court, unsuccessfully, over his ability to remove cases from her office, and in Monday’s letter, Scott also wants records on how much taxpayer money was spent during the court fight.

    The case in question is against Emerita Mapp, who is charged with first-degree murder in the stabbing death of Zackery Ganoe at a Kissimmee hotel.

    Mapp was arraigned on the charges on Aug. 23 and the state had 45 days to file an intent to seek the death penalty in the case.

    Ayala’s office, following the decision by a death penalty review panel formed in response to Scott’s removal of cases, filed the death penalty intent motion on Oct. 31.

    Ayala blamed Scott’s actions regarding death penalty cases for missing the deadline; Scott blames Ayala, insinuating that she may have purposefully not filed in time to take the death penalty off the table in Mapp’s case.

    “Most troublingly, your more recent public comments indicate that you were well aware of the deadline, but knowingly filed the notice long after it had elapsed,” Scott’s Monday letter said. “At best, this suggests negligence – and at worst, willful disregard – in the faithful performance of the duties of your constitutional office.”

    WFTV legal analyst and former Chief Judge Belvin Perry said Scott's ultimate determination on how and/or why the deadline was missed is key to Ayala's future as a state attorney.

    "When someone willfully does something, it may require harsher punishment, which could include her removal (from office)," Perry said.

    Among other things, Scott’s office demanded a written response by Dec. 11 on the following questions:

    Why Ayala decided to form a death penalty review panel and how members were selected.

    A description of procedures used by the review panel to determine if the death penalty is appropriate in a case.

    Dates the review panel has met since being formed on Sept. 1.

    Any other records regarding the death penalty review panel.

    Records pertaining to Kivvit, a Washington public relations firm retained by Ayala’s office during her court fight with Scott, including taxpayer money used to pay the company, outside attorneys and/or contractors.

    “As you know, Gov. Scott stands with the victims of crime and is committed to doing everything within his power to ensure they receive the justice they deserve,” Scott’s Monday letter said. “In light of your office’s delinquent filing – and your ongoing attempts to blame others for your office’s failures – Floridians deserve to better understand what happened, what you intend to do to remedy the situation, and what steps you intend to take to ensure that a similar failure will never occur again.”

    Perry said Scott's request for information was well within his rights as governor.

    "All these questions that were asked in that letter are reasonable questions to determine whether or not she is faithfully carrying out her duties," Perry said.

    http://www.wftv.com/news/local/scott...ight/658493767
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    “There are some people who just do not deserve to live,”
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    “Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

  8. #58
    Administrator Moh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    11,717
    State Attorney Ayala responds to Gov. Scott's death penalty questions

    Ayala wants to know how Scott chose which murder cases to strip from her

    By Adrienne Cutway
    clickorlando.com

    ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. - Orange-Osceola State Attorney Aramis Ayala issued a formal letter on Monday responding to Gov. Rick's Scott request for information about her office's death penalty review panel.

    Ayala also asked Scott to provide her with information on his "arbitrary" and "questionable" process of choosing which first-degree murder cases would be stripped from her and reassigned to a neighboring state attorney after Ayala announced earlier this year that she would not seek capital punishment in any case.

    "Your selection process has consequently threatened due process and equal protection under law. I too, stand with victims of crime. But I also stand boldly on, not just the Constitution, but all the amendments to it, including the 14th amendment," Ayala wrote.

    In her letter, Ayala writes that her office has proved that it is willing to pursue the death penalty when appropriate.

    She writes that in the case of accused murderer Emerita Mapp, her office communicated with Attorney General Pam Bondi's office about missing the 45-day deadline to file a notice to seek the death penalty and she was confident she could litigate that issue because Mapp had waived her right to a speedy trial.

    Bondi released the following statement Monday regarding Ayala's communication with her office about Mapp's case, calling Ayala's actions "inexcusable."

    "Ayala’s office reached out to my attorneys regarding an unidentified death penalty case WELL AFTER she missed the deadline in an attempt to salvage the case. My office provided potential legal arguments in an attempt to defend a death penalty case, and in an effort to correct her egregious actions. What she did is inexcusable in failing to meet a deadline required in a capital case. In no way do we condone her behavior. She continues to demonstrate that she is incompetent and unwilling to handle capital cases. We will continue to lend support to any effort to follow the law and ensure justice is done in any homicide in the ninth circuit."

    Mapp entered a plea on Friday and has been sentenced to life in prison.

    "I think you would agree, a plea to life in prison is a just resolution to this case. Since this case has been resolved, it seems most of your inquiries are rendered moot," Ayala wrote to Scott.

    Ayala claims that Scott "failed to do what [he] said [he was] going to do" because he told the public he would continue to examine first-degree murder cases in Orange and Osceola counties, yet he reassigned cases both before and after Mapp's arrest without a clearly defined selection process.

    Aside from wanting further information on Mapp's case, Scott's office also requested information about Ayala's seven-member death penalty review panel, which was established after Scott won his legal battle with Ayala regarding his authority to remove first-degree murder cases from her office against her will.

    The letter gave Ayala until Monday to answer questions regarding how often the panel has met, how it was established, what cases it has reviewed and to supply written confirmation that Ayala's office does plan to pursue the death penalty when appropriate.

    "By now, it should be clear to you that my office does consider the death penalty as a potential sentence in first-degree murder cases, and it should be obvious that I do, and have done, everything that I said I was going to do, including following the law," Ayala responded.

    A death penalty notice was filed Wednesday against Jimmy Merritt, who is accused of beating one man to death with a hammer and fatally shooting another.

    She started her response by noting that it would have been easier for Scott to have set up a meeting or phone call with her instead of issuing a letter to the media. She ended her letter by letting Scott know that her public records department will provide his office with the information regarding her legal invoices that he requested.

    Gov. Scott's Communication Director, John Tupps, issued the following statement Monday afternoon in regards to Ayala's response:

    “Today’s response from State Attorney Ayala is completely insufficient. What is especially troubling is her refusal to answer specific questions about her death penalty review panel. State Attorney Ayala needs to be more forthcoming with her office’s death penalty process to make it clear that she is going to follow the law and fight for victims. The Governor will continue to stand with victims of crime and push for the answers that the citizens of the Orlando area deserve.”

    https://www.clickorlando.com/news/st...alty-questions

  9. #59
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    12,463
    Prosecutor working death penalty cases to challenge State Attorney Aramis Ayala

    By Field Sutton
    WFTV 9 News

    One of the prosecutors handling death penalty cases out of Orange and Osceola counties wants to replace State Attorney Aramis Ayala.

    Two years ago, Ryan Williams worked in Ayala’s office before moving to a different district after she announced she was against the death penalty.

    On paper, Williams works for the state attorney’s office in Ocala, but he’s never handled a case out of there.

    Instead, he’s assigned to more than two dozen cases in Orange and Osceola counties that former gov. Rick Scott reassigned to the Ocala office after Ayala said she would not pursue the death penalty.

    "Ms. Ayala talks about integrity. But her actions tell a different tale,” said Williams.

    In his home town of Winter Garden, Williams had harsh words for his ex-boss.

    "Ms. Ayala's tenure as state attorney is the primary and best example of what happens when a prosecutor, cloaked with enormous authority, views victims and the law as secondary concerns to personal priorities,” he said.

    Since being elected, Ayala has traveled the country speaking about criminal justice reform, which Williams likens to being an absentee landlord.

    State Attorney Brad King, who is Williams’s new boss, said Williams is the reason Ayala’s former death penalty cases have stayed on track after they were reassigned to his office.

    “He cares about doing what’s right. He cares about leading people to do the same thing,” said King.

    Ayala released the following statement regarding Williams:

    "It is important to avoid distractions and respond to things that are legitimate and worthy of a response. I will continue to lead this community in seeking justice. I remain in the fight for change and progress. Most importantly, I remain focused on the job I have, not the job someone else wants."

    https://www.wftv.com/news/local/pros...yala/915165778
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    “There are some people who just do not deserve to live,”
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    “Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •