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Death Penalty Trial Set for Marco Garcia-Bravo in 2017 CO Murder of Derek Greer and Natalie Partida
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Thread: Death Penalty Trial Set for Marco Garcia-Bravo in 2017 CO Murder of Derek Greer and Natalie Partida

  1. #1
    Senior Member CnCP Legend CharlesMartel's Avatar
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    Death Penalty Trial Set for Marco Garcia-Bravo in 2017 CO Murder of Derek Greer and Natalie Partida


    Victims Derek Greer and Natalie Partida


    Marco Garcia-Bravo and Diego Chacon


    An arraignment has been pushed back for a man behind bars for his alleged involvement in the murders of two teenagers

    COLORADO SPRINGS, CO (KVOR) – An arraignment has been pushed back for a man behind bars for his alleged involvement in the murders of two teenagers.

    Marco Garcia-Bravo was one of ten people arrested for the killing of Coronado High School students Derek Greer and Natalie Partida in March of 2017.

    Garcia will appear again in court in three weeks.

    Many of the suspects have taken plea deals in exchange for testimony against their co-defendants.

    Prosecutors are thinking about seeking the death penalty against some of the suspects, including Garcia.

    http://www.kvor.com/2018/04/17/an-ar...two-teenagers/
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    Trials set for alleged shooters in executions of 2 Coronado students

    By Lance Benzel
    gazette.com

    Two men accused of pulling the trigger in the slayings of two Coronado High School students pleaded not guilty Monday, setting up trials for later this year.

    Diego Chacon, 20, is slated to face a jury Oct. 2 and Marco Garcia-Bravo, 21, is scheduled for trial Oct. 30, each on multiple counts of first-degree murder in the March 2017 deaths of Natalie Cano-Partida, 16, and Derek Greer, 15. The teenagers were abducted and shot at point-blank range, possibly over suspicions that Cano-Partida had aided gang rivals of those involved.

    Prosecutors previously announced they are considering pursuing the death penalty against the men. Under Colorado law, they have 63 days from Monday to disclose their decision.

    Of the five people charged with murder in the alleged gang plot, two have pleaded guilty to lesser charges, under plea bargains that compel them to testify against alleged co-conspirators. Joseph Rodriguez Jr., 19, faces 16-32 years in prison and Gustavo Antonio Marquez, 20, faces 32-38 years in prison. Their penalties are expected to be imposed later this year.

    A fifth murder suspect, Alexandra Romero, 22, is due to return to court June 4.

    http://gazette.com/trials-set-for-al...rticle/1625579

  3. #3
    Senior Member CnCP Legend CharlesMartel's Avatar
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    Prosecutors seeking death penalty in gang-related killings of Coronado High students

    By LANCE BENZEL
    The Colorado Springs Gazette

    El Paso County prosecutors intend to seek the death penalty against the alleged shooters in the gang-related killings of two Coronado High School students.

    The 4th Judicial District Attorney’s Office filed the required notices Friday in the first-degree murder cases against Diego Carlos Chacon, 20, and Marco Garcia-Bravo, 21, The Gazette has confirmed. They are accused of taking turns pulling the trigger in the March 2017 execution-style shootings of Derek Greer, 15, and Natalie Cano-Partida, 16.

    Prosecutors are expected to discuss their plans during hearings Monday before District Judge Larry E. Schwartz.

    The filings comes days after a jury threw out the death penalty against double-murderer Glen Law Galloway in El Paso County’s first capital case in a decade.

    In the case of Galloway, 46, lead prosecutor Reggy Short said the office chose to pursue death because of Galloway’s long history of flouting the law. That included going into hiding after a stalking conviction only to fatally shoot the victim, his ex-girlfriend Janice Nam, and a second person, Marcus Anderson, on consecutive days in May 2016.

    The basis for pursuing the deaths of Chacon and Garcia-Bravo wasn’t immediately clear. The lead prosecutor, Jim Bentley, couldn’t be reached for comment.

    Colorado law lays out 17 statutory aggravators that make murderers eligible for capital punishment, and requires that prosecutors prove at least one.

    At least two could apply in the teens’ slayings. One is the intentional killing of a person who was abducted by the defendants. The other is the allegation that the defendants were “party to an agreement to kill another person” that resulted in deaths.

    Authorities say Greer and Cano-Partida were abducted at gunpoint in Colorado Springs and later killed over suspicions that Cano-Partida had provided information to gang rivals.

    Ten people were arrested in the shocking crime, five of them charged with murder. Three of the murder suspects have since pleaded guilty to lesser charges under agreements that secure their testimony in court.

    After a harrowing drive with their captors, Greer and Cano-Partida were forced at gunpoint into "execution position" and shot at close range on Old Pueblo Road near Fountain. Chacon is alleged to have shot Cano-Partida first, before handing his pistol to Garcia-Bravo, who is accused of shooting Greer.

    Colorado’s death penalty has long been steeped in controversy, and the move to seek the death against youthful defendants is expected to draw scrutiny.

    The decision puts the El Paso County District Attorney’s Office at odds with the American Bar Association, which issued guidelines in February asking that prosecutors refrain from pursuing the death penalty against anyone under 21 at the time of the crime.

    The nonbinding recommendation cites the “growing medical consensus that key areas of the brain relevant to decision-making and judgment continue to develop into the early twenties.”The ABA is a professional association that represents nearly 400,000 lawyers in the United States.

    Prosecutors announced they were considering the death penalty against the pair when they were arraigned in April.

    The statutory deadline to file the required notice falls on Monday.

    The move is expected to delay the pair’s back-to-back trials, currently scheduled in October.

    https://gazette.com/news/prosecutors...7400abfbb.html
    Last edited by Moh; 07-08-2018 at 02:21 PM.
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  4. #4
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    Prosecutors face strict deadline in latest death-penalty bids in Coronado High killings

    By Lance Benzel
    Colorado Springs Gazette

    Prosecutors must clear an early hurdle in their plan to pursue the death penalty against the alleged shooters of two slain Colorado Springs teenagers: a ticking clock in the defendants’ speedy trial rights.

    Attorneys for Diego Chacon, 20, and Marco Garcia-Bravo, 21, want to stick with back-to-back trial dates set for October, they said at a joint hearing Monday.

    That’s a tight window for prosecutors to build the kind of cases necessary to win the state’s ultimate sanction.

    “It’s a little bit of a game of chicken,” said local defense attorney Phil Dubois, who isn’t affiliated with the cases. “They’re putting pressure on the prosecutors.”

    It’s a risky approach, Dubois said, because if prosecutors scramble to meet the deadline, it leaves the defense teams with precious little time.

    But the gambit could force the prosecution into abandoning its bid for death. That’s because defendants are entitled to trials within six months of being arraigned — part of a constitutional guarantee that generally trumps other considerations. Chacon and

    Garcia-Bravo were arraigned in April, six months from their October trial settings.

    Although judges are inclined to grant trial postponements if defense attorneys can’t be ready in time, prosecutors have a far tougher time asking for more time when speedy trial rights are in play, lest judges open ripe grounds for appeal.

    The issue arose during the first court appearance for Chacon and Garcia-Bravo since prosecutors filed the required notice two weeks ago to seek death. That decision came only days after the 4th Judicial District Attorney’s Office suffered defeat in its first capital case in a decade, when a jury threw out the death penalty against Glen Law Galloway after convicting him in a double-murder.

    Chacon and Garcia-Bravo are accused of taking turns pulling the trigger during the gang-related executions of 15-year-old Derek Greer and 16-year-old Natalie Cano-Partida in March 2017. Both were students at Coronado High School.

    In discussing trial logistics, lead prosecutor Jim Bentley raised the possibility of arranging for a different judge to preside over one of the trials. Attorney Joshua Tolini, who represents Chacon, argued to 4th Judicial District Judge Larry E. Schwartz that nothing in the law would require him to “bend over backwards” to accommodate the prosecution’s plans.

    Tolini said he would ask for a postponement only if he felt he couldn’t meet his ethical obligations to present the best defense possible.

    Schwartz scheduled a round of five pre-trial motions hearings in late August, without resolving the conundrum of how to try both men without violating their constitutional guarantees.

    The Galloway case involved about a year of pretrial arguments from the time prosecutors announced they would seek his death. Jury selection alone took more than two months, and the trial lasted about eight weeks.

    Whether both sides can be ready remains to be seen, but Dubois predicted: “There’s no way in the world this case is going to trial in October, not if they want to seek death.”

    Prior to Galloway, prosecutors last sought the death penalty against Colorado Springs cop killer Marco Lee, but he pleaded guilty and received a life sentence in prison.

    District Attorney Dan May attended Monday’s hearing but declined to address the recent spate of death penalty filings, telling this reporter, “I can’t talk about it.”

    May’s office said the death penalty component of the Galloway trial cost $109,000, an estimate that critics say fell far short of system-wide impacts of a death penalty case, which are estimated in the millions of dollars.

    The decision to seek death against Chacon and Garcia-Bravo also put the District Attorney’s Office in conflict with the American Bar Association, which called on prosecutors in February to rule out the death penalty against killers who were younger than 21 at the time of the crime.

    The nonbinding recommendation by the nation’s largest professional association of lawyers cited “the growing medical consensus that key areas of the brain relevant to decision-making and judgment continue to develop into the early twenties.”

    https://gazette.com/news/prosecutors...166779baf.html
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  5. #5
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    Coronado case: Death-penalty bid poised to add years of delays, defense says

    By Lance Benzel
    Colorado Springs Gazette

    Prosecutors’ decision to seek the death penalty for suspects in the execution-style killings of two Coronado High School students could add two to three years of delays to their cases, their attorneys said Tuesday.

    The question of when Diego Chacon and Marco Garcia-Bravo will get their day in court was left open as a judge agreed to postpone back-to-back trials in October.

    Among issues that must be addressed before new dates are set is whether they will be tried separately or together, as prosecutors have requested, said 4th Judicial District Judge David A. Shakes, who set a hearing on the issue for Nov. 18.

    The judge said he also wanted to rule, by January at the earliest, on defense motions challenging the constitutionality of potential death penalties for defendants who both were under age 21 at the time of the March 2017 crimes.

    “Don’t think that anything I’ve said means that I agree with a two-year continuance,” Shakes told prosecutors after they objected to the defense teams’ estimates.

    Chacon, 20, and Garcia-Bravo, 21, are accused of carrying out an abduction plot that led to the deaths of 16-year-old Natalie Cano-Partida and 15-year-old Derek Greer. Cano-Partida was the target over suspicions she was an informant for the men’s gang rivals, authorities have said. Derek allegedly was killed for being with her.

    The postponements came at the request of both defendants, who surrendered their speedy trial rights.

    The defense teams insisted on sticking with October trials until it became clear they couldn’t be ready.

    More time is needed to pore through more than 100,000 pages of reports and dozens of media files while preparing for what promise to be exhaustive pretrial battles, the court-appointed defense attorneys said.

    Lawyers for Garcia-Bravo, a Mexican national, say their investigators must travel to Mexico to begin probing his past in preparing to argue he shouldn’t be put to death in the event of convictions. Both defense teams say they must complete more legal training on the death penalty.

    Shakes was appointed to the case this month after Judge Larry E. Schwartz recused himself, citing his retirement plans. Schwartz didn’t give a date for his retirement, saying he planned to provide notice “within the next several months.”

    Within days of Shakes’ appointment, attorneys for Chacon sought to get him kicked off the case, citing his ties to two interns on their team.

    Both are students at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, and they said in affidavits they saw Shakes, a part-time instructor, as a personal mentor.

    Shakes denied the motion, saying he could set aside his prior relationships with the students. He announced Tuesday that the Colorado Supreme Court had declined to take up an appeal by Chacon’s team, letting his ruling stand.

    Prosecutors previously asked for separate trials but later said Chacon and Garcia-Bravo should be tried together.

    “I’m willing to consider that, but it’s going to take time,” Shakes said.

    The judge also ordered extra security measures in court. For the first time since the cases began, spectators were forced to go through a metal detector outside the courtroom. They also were barred from bringing in laptops or cell phones.

    Attorneys for Garcia-Bravo objected, saying the measures create a fearful environment, potentially introducing bias. Shakes batted down the argument, saying jurors wouldn’t be subjected to the measures.

    The judge didn’t mention threats, saying only that the measures were deemed necessary because the cases involve murders “with gang overtones.”

    The defendants, who are jailed without bond pending trial, are expected to return to court Oct. 3.

    https://gazette.com/news/coronado-ca...c14ffa317.html
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  6. #6
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    Trial set for last accused gunman in execution of Colorado Springs teens

    By KRDO.com

    COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - One of the last remaining suspects in the execution of two Colorado Springs teenagers is indicating that he'll take his case to trial, unlike multiple other suspects connected to the killings.

    Marco Garcia-Bravo is accused of pulling the trigger on 15-year-old Derek Greer shortly after Greer's friend, Natalie Partida, was executed. He appeared in court Thursday for a hearing, but he didn't offer to plead guilty like the other suspects in the case. His trial is set for July 8.

    The death penalty is still on the table for Garcia-Bravo, and the potential punishment was debated during Thursday's hearing.

    The other gunman, Diego Chacon, pled guilty earlier this month and will serve at least 65 years in prison.

    Chacon copped to two counts of second-degree murder Monday and admitted to shooting the 16-year-old Partida before another person killed Greer on March 12, 2017.

    During the hearing Thursday, defense attorneys and prosecutors argued about what evidence should be allowed and whether or not his school records, mental health records, and medical background should be included.

    According to arrest affidavits, Greer and Partida were fatally shot in an "execution position" because of an alleged theft by Partida. Read the timeline of events HERE.

    Another person who pleaded guilty to murder, Gustavo Marquez, admitted he helped lure the teens into the situation, and said he, Garcia-Bravo, and Chacon all drove out to the location on Old Pueblo Road, where the two were shot. Marquez claims he stood by as Chacon shot Partida, and Garcia-Bravo shot Greer.

    Alexandra Romero, another suspect, told investigators that she believed Chacon's role was to murder Partida, because he was carrying the only gun, and that Marquez was the kidnapper, because he was the only person that could get Partida in the car with them.

    Chacon will be sentenced on Jan. 23 and faces a stipulated sentence of 65 years in prison.

    One of the suspects accused of murder in the deaths of two Colorado Springs teenagers pleaded guilty to lesser charges Monday at the El Paso County Courthouse.

    Gustavo Marquez and Alexandra Romero faced first-degree murder charges for the deaths of 16-year-old Natalie Partida and 15-year-old Derek Greer on March 12, 2017 near exit 123 off Interstate 25. Ten people were charged with a variety of crimes in connection with the killings.

    Marquez pleaded guilty to two counts of second-degree murder Monday. He will face 16-19 years in prison for each count, though sentencing will take place on August 6. He also plans on testify against others in the case.

    In court, the judge said the sentences for the two charges will run back to back, meaning Marquez will spend a minimum of 32 years in prison for the crimes.

    Romero was scheduled to be arraigned Monday, but that was reset for 3 p.m. April 30.

    According to arrest affidavits, Greer and Partida were fatally shot in an "execution position." Two other men, Diego Chacon and Marco Garcia-Bravo, are the accused triggermen. In court on Monday, Marquez admitted he helped lure the teens into the situation, and said he, Garcia-Bravo, and Chacon all drove out to the location on Old Pueblo Road, where the two were shot. Marquez claims he stood by as Chacon shot Partida, and Garcia-Bravo shot Greer.

    Romero told investigators that she believed Chacon's role was to murder Partida, because he was carrying the only gun and that Marquez was the kidnapper, because he was the only person that could get Partida in the car with them.

    Romero told police that Partida was the intended target and that Greer was only murdered because he was present.

    Court documents say Marquez gave details about what happened the night Greer and Partida were shot. The incident may have stemmed from Partida allegedly taking a purse from someone at a party.

    https://www.krdo.com/news/trial-set-...eens/942988667
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  7. #7
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    Suspect in shooting deaths of Coronado High School students makes court appearance

    By Tyler Dumas
    KOAA.com Colorado Springs and Pueblo News

    EL PASO COUNTY – The death penalty is still on the table for one of the suspects in the deaths of Coronado High School students Natalie Cano-Partida and Derek Greer.

    Marco Garcia-Bravo was in an El Paso County courtroom Tuesday.

    The prosecution in the case is still working through the process on what is required of them to seek the death penalty for Garcia-Bravo.

    Today the defense team asked for more information from three co-defendants in the case.

    It was two-years-ago when the bodies of 16-year-old Natalie Cano-Partida and 15-year-old Derek Greer were found alongside old Pueblo Rd. According to court documents, they were shot execution style.

    The other person charged with murder in the case is Diego Chacon. He has plead guilty and will learn his sentence tomorrow.

    https://koaa.com/news/covering-color...rt-appearance/
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