izmir escort izmir escort antalya escort porno jigolo izmir escort bursa escort porno izle türk porno havalandırma sistemleri porno izle takipçi satın al youtube haberleri alsancak escort bursa escort bursa escort gaziantep escort denizli escort izmir escort istanbul escort istanbul escort istanbul escort izmir escort
Death Penalty Pursued for Paulo Virgen Mendoza in 2018 CA Slaying of Police Cpl. Ronil Singh - Page 2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Death Penalty Pursued for Paulo Virgen Mendoza in 2018 CA Slaying of Police Cpl. Ronil Singh

  1. #11
    Administrator Moh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    12,341
    They don't want to hurt his feelings.

  2. #12
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    15,032
    Gun tossed, cash wired: Alleged efforts made to aid suspect in Newman police shooting

    By Erin Tracy
    The Modesto Bee

    After allegedly shooting a Newman police officer, Gustavo Perez Arriaga spent the next two days traveling around Central California with help from several friends and family members, federal documents show.

    Charging documents against the seven people accused of helping Arriaga detail their roles in the days and hours following the shooting of Newman Police Cpl. Ronil Singh.

    The alleged accomplices of Arriaga, 32, provided him with changes of clothing, helped conceal his vehicle, drove him to multiple locations to hide, disposed of the murder weapon, harbored him in their home and paid a human trafficker $400 to get him to Mexico, according to an arrest affidavit by a Homeland Security special agent.

    Arriagas girlfriend Ana Leyde Cervantes, 30; his brothers Conrado Virgen Arriaga, 34, and Adrian Virgen, 25; and his co-worker Erik Razo Quiroz, 35, pleaded not guilty to felony accessory charges in Stanislaus County on Monday. Arriaga appeared in court on Wednesday, when his attorney called into question Arriagas mental competency. A mental health evaluation was ordered.

    Two other family members, Bernabe Madrigal Castaneda, 59, and Maria Luisa Moreno, 57, as well as another co-worker, Erasmo Villegas, 36, pleaded not guilty to felony accessory charges on Wednesday in Kern County, where they were arrested, along with Arriaga.

    In addition to the state charges, the seven were charged federally on Wednesday with conspiracy and aiding and abetting, harboring and shielding from detection an illegal alien. The charge comes with a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison.

    Castaneda, Moreno and Villegas also are charged with conspiracy to effect flight to avoid prosecution, and Quiroz is additionally charged with being an illegal alien in possession of a firearm.

    All but Moreno admitted to being in the United States illegally.

    The affidavit gave the following account:

    At 1 a.m. on Dec. 26, Cpl. Singh pulled over a Dodge pickup with paper dealer plates at Merced Street and Eucalyptus Avenue in Newman.

    He radioed for a backup unit and a Spanish speaking deputy to assist. It was seconds later that Singh radioed, Shots fired! Ive been hit!

    Responding officers found Singh face down near the curb west of his patrol vehicle. Hed been shot multiple times.

    Officers started CPR until medics arrived and drove him to Emanuel Medical Center in Turlock, where he was pronounced dead.

    Stanislaus County Sheriffs Department investigators were first tipped off about Arriaga (who identified himself in court as Paulo Virgen Mendoza) when a witness told them his pickup was in a carport concealed by plywood at a trailer in Martins Mobile Court along River Road, near Newman.

    At about 2 p.m. on Dec. 26, the Sheriff Departments SWAT team served a search warrant at the trailer, where Arriaga and Cervantes lived.

    Arriaga was gone, and the Dodge pickup was found behind the plywood with a bullet hole on the left rear passenger door.

    A 9mm casing that matched one found at the crime scene in front of Singhs patrol car was found inside the pickup.

    Through interviews after their arrests, detectives learned that Gustavo Perez Arriaga had left the trailer earlier in the day with his brother Conrado Virgen Arriaga and co-worker Quiroz.

    Cervantes told authorities that Gustavo Perez Arriaga returned to the trailer shortly after 1 a.m. and said hed shot a cop and was leaving. He left but returned around 5:30 a.m. with his brother and co-worker and asked her for work clothes.

    Cervantes told investigators that Gustavo Perez Arriaga was holding a pistol hed purchased two months prior.

    She gathered three changes of clothing while the men used plywood to cover the carport with the pickup inside.

    Conrado Virgen Arriaga told authorities that Cervantes told him his brother had shot a police officer but he didnt believe it until he later got a call from his wife, whod seen news reports of the killing.

    Conrado Virgen Arriaga said he, his brother and Quiroz left the trailer and went to the Flying J in Patterson to get gas and then had planned to go to a job at a construction site in Fairfield, where they were expected to work.

    But they changed their minds, Conrado Virgen Arriaga told authorities, and headed to their uncles ranch in Stockton so his brother could hide for a few days.

    The brothers aunt and uncle, however, after learning their nephew was wanted, told them they needed to leave.

    Before they did, Quiroz, at the request of Gustavo Perez Arriaga, disposed of a heavy metal object he believed to be a gun, in a trash bin at the ranch.

    Investigators later recovered from the bin a 9mm Smith and Wesson that had been stolen out of Washington state.

    After leaving the ranch, they went to locations in Merced County, ultimately stopping at a ranch in El Nido, where Gustavo Perez Arriagas other brother, Adrian Virgen, picked him up.

    Gustavo Perez Arriaga and Adrian Virgen went to an aunts home in Buttonwillow the night of Dec. 26 and spent the night.

    The next morning, the aunt learned Gustavo Perez Arriaga was wanted and she told them they couldnt stay there.

    Virgen told authorities that he lied to his aunts husband to get him to loan them $400, which he later wired to a human trafficker as payment for the purpose of concealing (Gustavo Perez Arriaga) and providing transport from Bakersfield Ca to Mexico. It was the same trafficker Virgen had used about four years ago to enter the United States illegally.

    Virgen next took his brother to the home of their relatives Castaneda and Moreno just outside of Bakersfield. After their arrival, Virgen and Castaneda went to a Metro PCS store to buy Gustavo Perez Arriaga a new cell phone.

    Erasmo Villegas, a co-worker of Gustavo Perez Arriaga, came to the home at his request with more changes of clothing.

    He also accepted a wire transfer of $500 from an unknown source to give to Gustavo Perez Arriaga to help pay for his transportation to Mexico.

    The next day, on Dec. 28, the Kern County Sheriffs Office SWAT team surrounded the home and Gustavo Perez Arriaga surrendered, along with the three others.

    No federal court date has yet been scheduled for the seven alleged accomplices, but all are scheduled to return to superior courts in Stanislaus and Kern counties to answer to state charges.

    https://www.bakersfield.com/gun-toss...0727331c5.html
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    "There are some people who just do not deserve to live,"
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    "Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

  3. #13
    Senior Member CnCP Legend CharlesMartel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    FRANCE
    Posts
    3,074
    Mental illness increasingly helps defendants avoid trial. But not always.

    By Garth Stapley
    The Modesto Bee

    More than two years after the murder of Stanislaus County Deputy Sheriff Dennis Wallace, a case against the accused shooter remains on hold because he was declared mentally incapable of standing trial.

    On Wednesday, the county’s latest accused cop killer — Paulo Virgen Mendoza, formerly identified as Gustavo Perez Arriaga — appeared headed down the same road. His attorney asked that Mendoza’s mental competence be evaluated before he enters a plea, effectively suspending prosecution for allegedly murdering Newman police Cpl. Ronil Singh on Dec. 26.

    Whether more of the general population is mentally ill, or claiming a mental defect is increasingly popular as a legal maneuver, is open to debate.

    A recent Los Angeles Times report cited a 33 percent jump in mentally ill inmates over the preceding three years. More than 800 inmates in California’s county jails were awaiting space in state hospitals for treatment aimed at restoring mental capacity so they might stand trial, the Times reported.

    The California Department of State Hospitals recently reported a 60 percent increase over the past four years in defendants needing treatment before trial.

    Stanislaus County District Attorney Birgit Fladager said there has been “a major increase” in local defendants claiming mental defects. She addressed the issue globally and not Mendoza’s situation or that of David Machado Jr., Wallace’s alleged killer.

    What’s the effect on Stanislaus courts and County Jail?

    From January 2017 through the end of September 2018, 216 defendants were declared incompetent, or mentally unfit to stand trial. Taxpayers cover the cost of housing and treating them until they’re restored to competency — $123.89 a day each for housing alone.

    More often than not, mental health doctors or judges don’t buy a defendant’s mental incapacity claims. Of 881 Stanislaus defendants whose attorneys requested evaluation in a recent 19-month period, 75 percent were found mentally sufficient to face charges.

    Mendoza, who may face the death penalty, was referred based on a brief conversation Wednesday with his court-appointed attorney, Stephen Foley. Mendoza, arrested after a 55-hour manhunt, will remain in custody and undergo a mental health evaluation before returning to court with a doctor’s report on Feb. 7, when Foley may decide whether to ask for a competency hearing.

    “I don’t think it’s a ploy or a tactic,” said Modesto defense lawyer Doug Maner, a former prosecutor who is not involved in the case. “It’s not fair or right to prosecute someone who doesn’t know what’s going on.”

    Defendants are guaranteed a fair trial under the Sixth Amendment. That means they must be able to understand charges against them and assist meaningfully in their defense, courts long have held.

    “It’s part of our legal system,” said Anne Hadreas, a managing attorney with Disability Rights California, in a telephone interview. “And it’s important to understand that if someone is found incompetent, it doesn’t mean they’re going to be released,” especially those arrested for violent crimes, she said.

    “I don’t want people to think of the IST (incompetent to stand trial) process as one where people are just getting off,” Hadreas continued. “If there are issues with dangerousness, there is an extensive procedure to ensure that public safety is balanced with the constitutional rights of the individual.”

    Machado, for instance, has had several competency hearings since his arrest in a Tulare County town a few hours after Wallace was shot while checking on a stolen vehicle at a fishing access near Hughson, in November 2016. The next hearing is scheduled for next week.

    Simple math suggests it has cost taxpayers nearly $100,000 so far just to house him. And those awaiting specifics of Wallace’s death, beyond the basics, are out of luck. The day of the shooting, Sheriff Adam Christianson declared Wallace had been “executed” by two shots to the head at close range. Former neighbors told The Bee at the time that Machado was paranoid, perhaps exacerbated by drugs.

    “Many people who get involved in violent crime have some mental illness,” said professor Michael Vitiello, who specializes in criminal cases and court procedure at the University of the Pacific’s McGeorge School of Law in Sacramento. “Are they all incompetent to stand trial? No. If their attorney has doubts, of course they should get evaluated.”

    Most counties send defendants needing mental health treatment before trial to state hospitals such as those at Napa or Atascadero. Stanislaus used to, until a recent expansion of the Public Safety Center provided room for treatment here, said Richard DeGette, the county’s director of Behavioral Health and Recovery Services.

    Legislation signed last summer by Gov. Jerry Brown allows judges to order mental health treatment instead of prosecution in some cases. AB 1810 also reserved $100 million for California’s top 15 counties most affected by defendants with mental illness; Stanislaus and San Joaquin counties are among them.

    “We’re in the very early stages of putting together a plan” for Stanislaus cases, DeGette said.

    Meanwhile, people not in jail who need immediate help with mental problems should call 888-376-6246, the county’s long-established toll-free line, DeGette said.

    https://www.modbee.com/news/local/cr...223942045.html
    In the Shadow of Your Wings
    1 A Prayer of David. Hear a just cause, O Lord; attend to my cry! Give ear to my prayer from lips free of deceit!

  4. #14
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    15,032
    Related:

    California Officer's Shooting Death Puts Sanctuary City Policies Under Scrutiny


    By Sylvia Longmire
    In Homeland Security

    On Dec.26, Officer Ronil Singh with the Newman (CA) Police Department pulled over a suspect just before 1 AM that morning. A few moments later, he called out “shot fired” over the radio, according to CNN. Emergency responders transported Singh to the hospital, where he was later pronounced dead. A manhunt began for his shooter, and on Dec. 29, police arrested in illegal immigrant from Mexico – a gang member with a criminal history. Now, members of the law enforcement community are saying Singh’s death could have been prevented if it were not for sanctuary city policies.

    California Values Act

    The suspect arrested in Kern, CA by sheriff’s deputies was identified as Gustavo Perez Arriaga, a 33 year-old Mexican citizen residing in California illegally and thought to be fleeing to Mexico when he was pulled over. Stanislaus County Sheriff Adam Christiansen told CNN that Arriaga had been previously arrested twice for DUIs and has a known gang affiliation. Several other people were arrested for aiding and abetting Arriaga, at least two of which were residing in the U.S. illegally. At a press conference, Christiansen stated that Singh’s murder could have been avoided because California legislation prohibited his department “from sharing any information with ICE [Immigration and Customs Enforcement] about this criminal gang member.”

    California SB 54, also known as the California Values Act (informally as the Sanctuary State bill), became law in 2017. According to ABC 10 News, the Act says that state and local law enforcement (in California) “are not allowed to investigate, interrogate, detain, detect, or arrest people for immigration enforcement purposes.” Fundamentally, that means that even if a police officer knows an individual with a criminal history (or arrested for allegedly committing a crime) is in the country illegally, he or she is prohibited from referring that individual to ICE for deportation.

    “This is a criminal illegal alien with prior criminal activity that should have been reported to ICE,” Christianson said at the press conference. “Law enforcement was prohibited because of sanctuary laws and that led to the encounter with Officer Singh. I’m suggesting that the outcome could have been different if law enforcement wasn’t restricted, prohibited or had their hands tied because of political interference.”

    Nationwide Sanctuary Cities

    According to the Washington Post, there are approximately 60 sanctuary cities around the country. These are cities that have passed laws instructing local law enforcement to refuse cooperation with the federal government in enforcing federal immigration laws. Part of the argument is that the federal government does not provide additional funding to these local law enforcement agencies for the additional time and manpower required for the work. The other part is that enforcing immigration laws at the local level discourages illegal immigrant residents from reporting crime to local police out of fear of deportation.

    One of the most publicized cases of an illegal immigrant murdering a U.S. citizen in a sanctuary city was the shooting death of 31 year-old Kathryn Steinle in San Francisco in 2015. According to the Washington Post, she was shot in the torso as she walked with her father at a popular tourist destination. A man was arrested an hour later, and it turned out that the Mexican national had seven felony conviction stretching back to 1991. He had also been deported from the U.S. five times. San Francisco authorities released him from custody in April 2015 after drug charges against him were dropped, despite an urgent request from DHS that he be deported. ICE publicly admonished San Francisco officials for ignoring their request for a heads-up before letting Steinle’s killer go.

    Illegal Immigration Convictions

    Statistics still show that illegal immigrants are much less likely to commit crimes than U.S. citizens. According to a study by the Cato Institute from 2015, there were 56 percent fewer criminal convictions of illegal immigrants than native-born Americans in Texas during that year. The criminal conviction rate for illegal immigrants was about 85 percent below the native-born rate. The data showed similar patterns for violent crimes such homicide and property crimes such as larceny. According to a separate study by the journal Criminology, states with larger shares of illegal immigrants tended to have lower crime rates than states with smaller shares in the years 1990 through 2014.

    Despite these statistics, the current political climate and immigration crisis along the southwest border makes tragedies like the murder of Officer Singh ripe for politicization by those looking for reasons to crack down further on illegal immigration.

    https://inhomelandsecurity.com/sanct...nder-scrutiny/
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    "There are some people who just do not deserve to live,"
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    "Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

  5. #15
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    15,032
    DA: Three Kern residents accused of helping alleged cop killer will be tried in federal court

    The Bakersfield Californian

    The Kern County District Attorney's office has dismissed state charges against three local residents accused of aiding the alleged killer of a Stanislaus County police officer because the defendants will be tried in federal court, where they face more serious punishment.

    Bernabe Madrigal Castaneda, Maria Louis Moreno and Erasmo Villegas were each charged Jan. 2 with being an accessory to the murder of Officer Ronil Singh by harboring Gustavo Perez Arriaga, the officer's alleged killer.

    On Jan. 14, the DA's office, in consultation with federal authorities, agreed to defer to federal prosecution of the three as they "face a more serious punishment under federal laws than what California's newly revised criminal justice statutes allow," according to a DA's news release.

    Under Assembly Bill 109, convictions on a charge of being an accessory to any crime including murder are no longer eligible for state prison terms, only local jail terms, the release said.

    https://www.bakersfield.com/news/bre...0e99ff49f.html
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    "There are some people who just do not deserve to live,"
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    "Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

  6. #16
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    15,032




    Prosecutors drop charges for defendants accused of accessory in Newman cop killing

    By Rosalio Ahumada
    Modesto Bee

    The Stanislaus County District Attorneys Office on Thursday morning dropped charges against four people accused of helping a man evade capture after the shooting death of Newman Police Cpl. Ronil Singh.

    The defendants were expected to be released from the Stanislaus County Jail by Friday morning into the custody of federal authorities.

    Deputy District Attorney Jeff Mangar told the judge that the charges against the defendants were being dismissed, and the U.S. Attorneys Office was taking over their prosecution in federal court.

    Paulo Virgen Mendoza has been charged with murder in Singhs death. Mendoza is accused of killing Singh during a Dec. 26 traffic stop in Newman. Mendoza is still identified in jail records as Gustavo Perez Arriaga, an alias.

    Mendozas girlfriend, Ana Leyde Cervantes, his brothers Conrado Virgen Mendoza and Adrian Virgen, and his co-worker Erik Razo Quiroz had pleaded not guilty to felony accessory charges in Stanislaus County.

    On Thursday, the defendants entered the courtroom wearing jail inmate jumpsuits with shackled handcuffs on their wrists and ankles. They sat quietly as the prosecutor dropped the local charges. Stanislaus County sheriffs deputies then ushered the defendants out of the courtroom at the end of the brief hearing.

    Mangar has said the defendants now will face a more serious punishment under federal law. When making its decision, the District Attorneys Office considered that state convictions on a charge of being an accessory to any crime including murder are no longer eligible for state prison terms, only local jail sentences, according to Mangar.

    Cervantes, Mendoza, Virgen, and Quiroz are among seven defendants facing federal charges; accused of helping Mendoza slip through a police dragnet and try to escape into Mexico. After a 55-hour manhunt, Paulo Virgen Mendoza was captured near Bakersfield.

    If convicted of the federal charge of conspiracy and aiding and abetting, harboring and shielding from detection an illegal alien, each defendant could face a maximum sentence of 20 years in federal prison, according to a criminal complaint filed Jan. 2 in federal court.

    Bernabe Madrigal Castaneda, Maria Luisa Moreno and Erasmo Villegas were arrested near Bakersfield along with Mendoza days after the deadly shooting. The Kern County District Attorneys Office also chose to drop their local accessory charges because the defendants face more serious punishment under federal court, the Bakersfield Californian reported.

    On Tuesday, Castaneda, Moreno and Villegas appeared in federal court in Fresno. Not guilty pleas to the federal charges were entered on their behalf, and they were scheduled to return to court Jan. 22.

    As of Thursday afternoon, officials had not scheduled an arraignment hearing in federal court for Cervantes, Mendoza, Virgen, and Quiroz. They remained in custody at the Stanislaus County Jail on a federal holding order, presumably to be transferred to federal custody by Friday.

    The accessory defendants are accused of providing the murder suspect with changes of clothing, helping conceal his vehicle, driving him around to hide, disposing of the murder weapon, harboring him in their home and paying a human trafficker $400 to smuggle him into Mexico, according to an arrest affidavit by a Homeland Security special agent.

    Out of the seven defendants, all but Moreno have admitted to entering the United States illegally, according to the affidavit filed in support of the federal criminal complaint. Local and federal authorities have said that Paulo Virgen Mendoza also entered the country illegally.

    The prosecution of Mendoza in the murder case will remain in Stanislaus County. Mendoza on Thursday remained in custody without bail in the county jail. He now is scheduled to return to court Wednesday as the court tries to determine whether Mendoza is mentally fit to face criminal charges. His murder case remains suspended.

    https://www.modbee.com/news/local/cr...224676655.html
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    "There are some people who just do not deserve to live,"
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    "Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

  7. #17
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    15,032
    7 People Indicted On Federal Charges Of Helping Suspect In Newman Officers Murder Try To Escape To Mexico

    CBS News Sacramento

    STANISLAUS COUNTY (CBS13) The seven people accused of helping the suspect in the murder of Newman police officer Ronil Singh avoid police have been federally indicted.

    The district attorneys office announced on Friday that the seven people were indicted by a federal grand jury on conspiring to aid and abet Gustavo Perez Arriaga.

    Prosecutors have said Arriaga was trying to escape to Mexico after shooting and killing Cpl. Singh on Dec. 26.

    The seven people charged are as follows:

    Erik Razo Quiroz, 29, of Merced; Adrian Virgen-Mendoza, 25, of Fairfield; Conrado Virgen Mendoza, 34, of Chowchilla; Erasmo Villegas-Suarez, 36, of Buttonwillow; Ana Leydi Cervantes-Sanchez, 31, of Newman; Bernabe
    Madrigal-Castaneda, 59, of Lamont; and Maria Luisa Moreno, 57, of Lamont.

    According to court documents, prosecutors allege the seven transported, hosted and provided Arriaga with clothes, money and a new cellphone. They also allegedly hid the truck Arriaga was driving when the shooting took place and disposed of the gun.

    Further, prosecutors say the conspirators planned to wire money to smuggle Arriaga out of California and back to Mexico.

    Arriaga, authorities say, is in the US illegally from Mexico.

    The case has attracted national attention. President Donald Trump, seizing on Arriagas immigration status, has used the case to push for the building of a border wall.

    https://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2019/01/25/newman-officer-ronil-singh-murder-federal-indictment-7-people/
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    "There are some people who just do not deserve to live,"
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    "Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

  8. #18
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    15,032
    Man pleads not guilty to killing Northern California officer

    By Associated Press

    MODESTO, CALIF. A man suspected of being in the country illegally has pleaded not guilty to killing a Northern California police officer during a traffic stop in a case that has rekindled a debate over California's sanctuary law that limits law enforcement's cooperation with federal immigration authorities.

    An attorney for Paulo Virgen Mendoza entered the not guilty plea to a murder charge in Stanislaus Superior Court, the Modesto Bee reported Thursday. Mendoza is charged with fatally shooting Newman Police Officer Cpl. Ronil Singh on Dec. 26.

    Investigators say Singh suspected Mendoza of drunken driving.

    Authorities say Mendoza was in the country illegally and was fleeing back to his native Mexico when he was arrested two days after Singh's killing near Bakersfield.

    President Donald Trump seized on the case to call for tougher border security amid a fight with congressional Democrats over funding for a border wall, which has forced a partial government shutdown.

    The sheriff leading the investigation blamed California's sanctuary law for preventing local authorities from reporting Gustavo Perez Arriaga to U.S. immigration officials for two previous drunken driving arrests. If he had been deported, Stanislaus County Sheriff Adam Christianson said, Cpl. Ronil Singh of the tiny Newman Police Department would still be alive.

    The case was put on hold in January to determine if Mendoza was mentally fit to stand trial. On Thursday, a judge determined he was competent to stand trial after Mendoza was examined by a psychiatrist.

    Mendoza is still identified in Stanislaus County jail records as Gustavo Perez Arriaga, an alias that he used when arrested. But he's referred to in court by his given name.

    Prosecutors say Mendoza is eligible for the death penalty.

    https://www.whio.com/news/national-g...UKeTacVqDj47N/
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    "There are some people who just do not deserve to live,"
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    "Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

  9. #19
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    15,032
    DA to seek death penalty against man accused of killing Newman police Cpl. Ronil Singh

    By Erin Tracy
    Modesto Bee

    The District Attorneys Office will seek the death penalty against the man accused of fatally shooting Newman police Cpl. Ronil Singh the day after Christmas in 2018.

    After thoughtful consideration, deliberation, and much consultation with the victims family and their wishes, we are seeking the death penalty in this special circumstance murder case, Chief Deputy District Attorney Jeff Mangar said in an email to The Bee.

    He made the announcement in court last week during a hearing for Paulo Virgen Mendoza.

    Also during the hearing, Judge Ricardo Crdova denied a motion by defense attorney Stephen Foley to put off Mendozas preliminary hearing, which is scheduled to begin Tuesday.

    Mangar said Mendozas preliminary hearing had been continued three times previously, once at the request of the prosecution because a witness was not available to testify and twice at the request of the defense to have more time to prepare.

    Foley argued in a motion filed May 15, that as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, neither he nor officials from the Mexican Consulate have been able to visit Mendoza in person since March 14.

    According to the motion, several meetings between Mendoza, Foley and an attorney from the consulate had to be canceled as a result of the pandemic.

    Foley wrote in the motion that he needs to discuss the specifics of an important matter which arose since the setting of the Preliminary Hearing ... Because of the sensitive nature of this matter ... only a face to face discussion would facilitate a productive outcome.

    In his opposition to Foleys motion, Mangar wrote, Many court staff, judicial officers and attorneys, have managed to meet without concern for Covid-19 via Zoom, Teams, Skype and other virtual means in addition to telephone conferencing.

    He also pointed to a notice by the Stanislaus County Sheriffs Department regarding limitations on visits, which said attorneys could still conduct their visits through glass or by video visit.

    The preliminary hearing, to determine if there is enough evidence for Mendoza to stand trial, is expected to last four days.

    Authorities say Mendoza shot Singh shortly after the police corporal pulled him over near the intersection of Merced Street and Eucalyptus Avenue on suspicion of driving under the influence.

    A 55-hour manhunt ended with Mendozas capture at a home near Bakersfield.

    At least five people have been convicted in federal court of helping Mendoza as he fled from authorities.

    https://www.modbee.com/news/local/cr...243025076.html
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    "There are some people who just do not deserve to live,"
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    "Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •