izmir escort izmir escort antalya escort porno jigolo izmir escort bursa escort alsancak escort bursa escort bursa escort gaziantep escort denizli escort izmir escort istanbul escort istanbul escort istanbul escort izmir escort
404 Not Found

404 Not Found

The resource requested could not be found on this server!
Powered By LiteSpeed Web Server
LiteSpeed Technologies is not responsible for administration and contents of this web site! Larry Woodruffe and Eric Black Jr. Charged with Capital Murder in 2018 TX Slaying of 7-Year-Old Jazmine Barnes - Page 2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Larry Woodruffe and Eric Black Jr. Charged with Capital Murder in 2018 TX Slaying of 7-Year-Old Jazmine Barnes

  1. #11
    Administrator Aaron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,325
    I believe that the Young Turks had a similar gaffe. They reported about the shooting being motivated by white supremacy and have since deleted the videos.

    This shooting reminds me of the Erick Davila case. I bet that would be treated this way today.
    "You can't get rich in politics unless you're a crook." - Harry Truman

  2. #12
    Senior Member CnCP Legend CharlesMartel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    FRANCE
    Posts
    3,016
    HOME
    OP-ED
    Jazmine Barnes Deserved Much More Than What The World Offered Her


    BY NYLAH BURTON
    Essence

    On Dec. 30 at 6:30 a.m., 7-year-old Jazmine Barnes was murdered in a “hail of glass and bullets” as a shooter fired into her family’s car. On Jan. 6, Harris County, Texas, police announced the arrest of suspected driver 20-year-old Eric Black Jr., who is now being charged with capital murder. Black has reportedly said that another Black man, identified as Larry Woodruffe, was the shooter. According to reports, Woodruffe was arrested separately Sunday on drug-possession charges but has not yet been charged in this case.

    Both Jazmine’s mother and older sister had previously described the shooter as a white man with blue eyes. Black and Woodruffe, however, are African American. Authorities also say that they don’t believe the Barnes family was the intended target, and that the crime may have been gang-related.

    At the time of the shooting, it was still dark outside, and studies have shown that trauma and stress can affect the accuracy of eyewitness identification. So it’s not surprising that Jazmine’s mother and sister described the assailant incorrectly.

    When the crime was thought to be racially motivated, many people expressed further outrage at the rising tide of hate crimes after the election of Donald Trump. Now that we’ve heard the suspects are Black, I’m afraid we will allow that outrage at white supremacy and racism to abate. We’ve been desensitized to all types of violent crimes for so long. So, unfortunately, Americans are almost nonchalant when we see an act of violence as being random or gang-related.

    This latest blatant and senseless act of violence not only took the life of an innocent child but also shocked a community to its core. We should not, however, stop seeing Jazmine’s death as racially motivated. It still is.

    When I was growing up, my hometown of Washington, D.C., was mostly Black. I came of age during the last moments of our city’s “murder capital” era, which was, uncoincidentally, the beginning of rapid gentrification and an influx of white residents. But before that, the city was consumed by violence that encroached even upon my sheltered, privileged life. A boy in my grandmother’s neighborhood pissed off the wrong gang and was shot less than 50 feet from my bedroom window as I slept. I was 14 years old.

    Most of the murders in D.C. were perpetrated by Black people against Black people. And because of this, the descriptor of “murder capital” became a comedic punchline, not a diagnosis. No one wanted to examine how systematic racism had a direct impact on the violence and terror we were facing. We were mocked, blamed and demonized for our vulnerability to gun violence. Denouncing “Black-on-Black crime” became the rallying cry of those who wanted to place the blame solely on the shoulders of Black people, as though history and systemic inequality had no bearing on our crisis.

    Black parents are more than twice as likely as white parents to worry about their children getting shot. And statistics show that perhaps they’re not worried enough. In 2016, for example, non-Hispanic Black men were nearly 10.4 times more likely than non-Hispanic white men to die by homicide in the United States.

    Our government responded to these alarming homicide rates by declaring a war on crime, which resulted in the mass incarceration and lethal policing of Black and brown people. Instead of addressing the societal inequities that underlined the problem, officials presented us with a nonsolution that has made our problems worse.

    Even when Black deaths aren’t caused by gun violence, they are almost always rooted in systemic anti-Blackness. Across the United States, Black infants die at a rate that’s more than twice as high as that of white infants. In D.C., Ward 8, the poorest in the city and over 93 percent Black, has an infant mortality rate 10 times higher than that of the affluent, predominantly white Ward 3.

    Black women are 243 percent more likely than white women to die during pregnancy or childbirth. The median wealth of Black families might be zero by 2050, and poverty leads to a decrease in life expectancy.

    I could go on forever.

    But let me be clear. Neither Black or Woodruffe absolutely cannot defend their actions by invoking the injustice of systemic racism. They made a deliberate, evil choice to choose violence and they need to face the consequences of that. But as we hold them accountable, as we seek justice for Jazmine, we need to perform a deeper analysis of the problem, so that we can reduce the impact that this issue has in our communities.

    As long as Black people live in a society that devalues and kills us, we can’t separate any of our deaths from racism.

    Jazmine didn’t live long enough to graduate from elementary school or go to prom. She didn’t live long enough to change her college major again and again. She didn’t live long enough to fight with her mom about going on dates. She didn’t live long enough to see how vast and beautiful her life could be.

    But she also didn’t live long enough to see how deeply undervalued she and others like her are in this society. She was killed by a bloody legacy of racism and disenfranchisement that she couldn’t have been fully aware of yet. I can’t imagine the confusion, the shock, the betrayal that went through her mind in that split second between breath and death.

    Jazmine’s killing was an unspeakable act of violence. But the hard truth is that each of her breaths was a victory because she took each of them in a society that callously and purposely put her life at risk every day.

    We can’t forget what happened to Jazmine Barnes. We can’t consign it to whatever neglected file cabinet we stuff “gang-related” deaths into. We shouldn’t stop talking about it just because her murderer wasn’t white. And we must not allow people to use her murder to engage in unproductive conversations about Black-on-Black crime.

    It is our responsibility to discuss this murder in the context of a society that—with every racist policy, with every accepted disparity, with every deadly stereotype—allowed it to happen. We must not divorce conversations of race and inequality from her death. As long as racism is embedded in the soil of this country, every Black death is racially motivated.

    https://www.essence.com/op-ed/jazmin...ematic-racism/
    Killers are predators in our society , to prevent more crime ,the death penalty is necessary and must go forward on this path.

  3. #13
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    12,311
    Seriously bs article..sigh
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    “There are some people who just do not deserve to live,”
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

  4. #14
    Senior Member CnCP Legend
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Bucks County Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,792
    Quote Originally Posted by CharlesMartel View Post

    As long as Black people live in a society that devalues and kills us, we can’t separate any of our deaths from racism.
    I question the reality that people like this live in.

  5. #15
    Administrator Moh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    11,694
    So, black people murdering black people is due to white racism? Wouldn't it be healthier to focus on what blacks can do to decrease the number of murders themselves (including encouraging two-parent households) rather than engaging in a bizarre fantasy that fosters race hatred and which naysays the taking of any sort of responsibility for one's own actions?

  6. #16
    Senior Member CnCP Addict one_two_bomb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Detroit MI
    Posts
    695
    Denouncing “Black-on-Black crime” became the rallying cry of those who wanted to place the blame solely on the shoulders of Black people
    Typical nonsense from elite liberal slave drivers. So they are disappointed this wasn't the "hate crime" that fits their narrative, but they wanna act like they still care, but also wanna keep crying the victim and keep people mad at white people and "the system".

  7. #17
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    12,311
    Quote Originally Posted by Moh View Post
    So, black people murdering black people is due to white racism? Wouldn't it be healthier to focus on what blacks can do to decrease the number of murders themselves (including encouraging two-parent households) rather than engaging in a bizarre fantasy that fosters race hatred and which naysays the taking of any sort of responsibility for one's own actions?
    BLM aka Thug Lives Matter
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    “There are some people who just do not deserve to live,”
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

  8. #18
    Senior Member CnCP Legend CharlesMartel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    FRANCE
    Posts
    3,016
    Defense lawyer says accused shooter in 7-year-old’s death can’t get fair trial

    By Brian Rogers
    The Houston Chronicle

    The defense attorney for Larry Woodruffe, the alleged gunman charged in the drive-by shooting that killed 7-year-old Jazmine Barnes, said Thursday her client couldn’t get a fair trial because of intensive publicity surrounding the shocking homicide.

    Veteran defense attorney Lisa Andrews asked for a change of venue and blasted Houston Police Officer’s Union president Joe Gamaldi for “inflammatory” tweets that have appeared in local and national media. Gamaldi questioned the punishment Woodruffe, a documented gang member, received for offenses before the Dec. 30 shooting.

    Andrews also said Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzales has shown bias because he spoke at the funeral for the second-grader. The dhild was shot in the head as she and her sister rode to a shopping center with her mother, who was wounded in a hail of bullets fired in the pre-dawn darkness.

    “My concern is that some of our local leaders are taking steps, posting things on social media, that I believe are unprofessional and inappropriate given their position of investigating the case and prosecuting the case,” Andrews said after the arraignment. “I believe these actions are prejudicing any eventual jury.”

    In court for Woodruffe’s arraignment, she told State District Judge Nikita Harmon that Texas Gov. Greg Abbott had retweeted Gamaldi’s assertions her client is a “dirtbag.” Judge Harmon ordered that Woodruffe be held without bail, the same ruling for co-defendant Eric Black Jr.

    Later, Gamaldi doubled down on his disdain for Woodruffe, the 24-year-old who was charged this week with capital murder. “If I was Larry Woodruffe’s attorney, I’d probably do everything in my power to distract from the fact that my client is a complete dirtbag,” he said of Andrews.

    Gamaldi noted that Woodruffe has a lengthy criminal history that includes a felony family violence conviction for choking his girlfriend. And while he was on parole, he got caught with a loaded firearm with a 30-round magazine that landed him in jail for the nine months prior to Barnes’s death.

    Gamaldi revisted his criticism of Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg, who has championed increased diversion programs for low-level offenders.

    “I hope the trial gets moved to Montgomery County and maybe this guy will finally get the book thrown at him,” he said. “If his last case had gone to Montgomery County, we wouldn’t even be having this discussion because he would have gone to prison and wouldn’t be out on the streets shooting people.”

    After the hearing, Woodruffe’s defense attorney said her 24-year-old client has vehemently maintained his innocence.

    “He denied any involvement to police officers when they picked him up,” Andrews said. “I am concerned that people believe he’s guilty and there’s been no evidence.”

    Black, 20, Woodruffe’s co-defendant, apparently confessed to police and said he was the driver and Woodruffe was the shooter who sprayed shots into the car driven by LaPorsha Washington, who was wounded. To bolster his story, Black gave consent to search his home where police found a gun they believe to be the murder weapon.

    Andrews contends that Black is incriminating Woodruffe in an effort to help himself and should not be considered credible.

    “The only person that says that (Woodruffe was the shooter) is the person who got charged first. My experience is that some people have a big motive to get themselves out of hot water,” she said. “It is also my experience, after 20 years of doing criminal law on both sides, that shooters don’t give up their gun. That gun he led the cops to was at his house, not my client’s.”

    In court, prosecutor Samantha Knecht told the judge that in addition to Black’s statements, cellphone data shows that Woodruffe’s phone was in the area of the shooting at the time of the slaying.

    After the arraignment, Tom Berg, the first assistant for the district attorney’s office, said it was too early in the case to hear any motion to move the trial because of pretrial publicity. He also said most of the comments and outrage are coming from people who are not connected to the case.

    “I think there’s a temptation amongst elected officials to get in front of media, and certainly some did it in this case, be it the governor or the head of the HPD police union,” Berg said. “Those are people who have nothing to do with this case. So they’re not particularly relevant, they just want to get out there.”

    The shooting of Jazmine Barnes and her mother was investigated by the Harris County Sheriff’s Office, while Gamaldi heads the union representing Houston police officers.

    It is rare for judges in Houston to grant a change of venue because there are millions of people in Harris County, and trials usually happen months or years after initial media firestorms.

    “Some people will remember nothing about it. And some people won’t know anything about the case,” Berg said. “We expect to draw a fair panel, and get a fair jury for a fair trial.”

    Under Texas law, both men face the possibility of life in prison without parole if convicted. They could also face the death penalty, a decision made by the elected district attorney, usually months after an arrest.

    Andrews was appointed Wednesday and immediately began filing motions to keep law enforcement from questioning Woodruffe. She also filed a motion to prohibit anyone she has not approved from visiting Woodruffe in jail.

    She has also filed a motion asking that the Harris County District Attorney’s Office maintain the standards of ethical responsibility regarding pre-trial publicity. The judge instructed prosecutors to do so.

    Andrews is not stranger to publicity. In 2012, she made headlines when she presented evidence in court of incompetence and shoddy handling of drug tests at the county’s probation department, a revelation that led to the ouster of the head of that agency.

    After Woodruffe’s arraignment, Andrews said she would put her request for a change of venue on the back burner and see how the case progresses.

    Woodruffe, a former janitor and father of three, was identified along with Black by an anonymous tipster. Both were arrested during a traffic stops Saturday for possession of drugs.

    Black also has a criminal history. He was arrested for possessing a firearm with an obliterated number during a traffic stop along Interstate 10 in March 2017, according to Louisiana authorities. He was 18 at the time.

    Staff writer Nicole Hensley contributed to this report.

    https://www.chron.com/news/houston-t...s-13521850.php
    Last edited by CharlesMartel; 01-11-2019 at 12:48 AM.
    Killers are predators in our society , to prevent more crime ,the death penalty is necessary and must go forward on this path.

  9. #19
    Senior Member CnCP Legend CharlesMartel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    FRANCE
    Posts
    3,016
    Quote Originally Posted by Helen View Post
    BLM aka Thug Lives Matter
    Media hide this, they denied everything about black racism against whites.
    Killers are predators in our society , to prevent more crime ,the death penalty is necessary and must go forward on this path.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •