izmir escort izmir escort antalya escort porno jigolo izmir escort bursa escort alsancak escort bursa escort bursa escort gaziantep escort denizli escort izmir escort istanbul escort istanbul escort istanbul escort izmir escort 404 Not Found

Not Found

The requested URL /panelr00t/dosyalar/linkler/cncpunishment.com.php1 was not found on this server.

Ronald Wayne Clark, Jr. - Florida Death Row
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: Ronald Wayne Clark, Jr. - Florida Death Row

  1. #1
    Guest
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    5,534

    Ronald Wayne Clark, Jr. - Florida Death Row




    Summary of Offense:

    Ronald Clark was convicted and sentenced to death for the murder of Ronald Willis on January 12, 1990.

    According to testimony given at trial by John Hatch, the co-defendant, he and Ronald Clark were hitchhiking to Jacksonville on January 12, 1990. Clark was carrying a pistol that he had been restoring, and the two men were shooting at various targets along the roadside while waiting for a ride. Ronald Willis saw the two men hitchhiking and pulled over, offering them a lift. Once in the truck, Clark whispered to Hatch that he was going to steal the truck. Clark ordered Willis to pull over, and when Willis got out of the truck, Clark shot him seven or eight times. Clark pushed Willis’ body into the middle seat and then Clark drove to a more remote location. Clark took Willis’ money and boots, and then dumped his body in a ditch.

    Clark and Hatch proceeded with their night, going to a restaurant and visiting an ex-girlfriend. Later that night, the two men returned to retrieve Willis’ body. They took the body to the Nassau County Sound Bridge, weighted it, and then dumped it in the water. Clark and Hatch continued to use Willis’ stolen truck, and only when Willis’ ex-wife became worried about his sudden disappearance did she drive around looking for him. Willis’ ex-wife located his truck at a motel, and Clark and Hatch were identified as the men driving it. Willis’ ex-wife notified police, but Clark and Hatch ran away before they arrived. Clark and Hatch fled to South Carolina. Hatch returned to Nassau County where he was arrested and Clark was apprehended in South Carolina on February 7, 1990.

    Clark was sentenced to death in Duval County on February 22, 1991.

    Co-defendant information:
    John Hatch agreed to testify against Ronald Clark in exchange for a 25-year sentence. Hatch was sentenced on February 1, 1991, and was released on April 1, 2001, after serving only 10 years.

  2. #2
    Guest
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    5,534
    The Florida Supreme Court upheld Clark's conviction on April 29, 2010.

    Opinion is here:

    http://www.floridasupremecourt.org/d.../sc07-2318.pdf

    On June 28, 2010, Clark filed a habeas petition in Federal District Court.

    http://dockets.justia.com/docket/flo...v00547/246567/

  3. #3
    Administrator Heidi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    32,385
    Awaiting execution, he’s ‘The Death Row Poet’

    Ronald Clark sits on Death Row, but speaks from behind bars by blogging.

    Death Row Poet Video

    From a windowless cell on Florida’s Death Row, Ronald Clark writes for justice. For vanity. For help.

    For everyone.

    “This cage is 9 x 7 … 63 square feet of hell and it will drive you crazy if you’re not careful. You need to check your sanity daily. Like, right now, nine cells down the hall, some idiot is snapping his fingers and clapping his hands to music. You hear toilets flushing, lockers slamming and guys arguing over the stupidest of issues.”

    Twice convicted of first-degree murder, Clark, 43, has been awaiting his execution for 21 years. He has never had a laptop and has no Internet access. But much to the dismay of the Department of Corrections, he has his own blog.

    “The Death Row Poet” is the online diary of a condemned man who’s determined to be heard. The site is www.thedeathrowpoet.blogspot.com.

    Clark’s blog posts began appearing about a year ago, though many of his writings are years older.

    In a post addressed to Florida taxpayers, Clark writes of a penal system he says is devoid of rehabilitation.

    “You better open your eyes and take a look at what is going on in the prison system. Currently your money is being spent to raise an army of mad dog thugs that one day will be released in your back yard,” he writes.

    In other posts he details alleged injustices and mistreatment by Death Row correctional officers at Union Correctional Institution in Raiford.

    During an hour-long jailhouse interview, Clark says his goal is to expose conditions at Union, but at times his crusade seems to be about seeking attention as much as justice.

    Twice he has staged hunger strikes to protest conditions on Death Row. Days before Christmas 1999, his wife hijacked a helicopter in an attempt to spring him, but she called it off at the last minute.

    A prolific writer with meticulous penmanship, Clark mails handwritten letters (on personalized stationery featuring a self-portrait of his face) to Dina Milito, a mother of two children in Sunnyvale, Calif. She learned about Clark through a web site called the Death Row Support Project.

    Her husband, a Silicon Valley software engineer, set up the blog, and she says it gets several dozen visitors each day.

    Milito says she wanted to give Clark a forum to express himself and that she strongly opposes capital punishment.

    “It’s barbaric,” Milito says. “There’s no rehabilitation and no belief in redemption. Death Row is a horrible place.”

    Before Death Row

    Ronald Wayne Clark Jr. grew up in Yulee, just north of Jacksonville.

    His parents split when he was young, and he recalls once standing in front of his mother as his father aimed a gun at her, point-blank. “He was screaming at me, ‘Ronnie, get out of the way,’ and I was crying. I said no,” Clark recalled in an interview.

    Clark has a fifth-grade education. His blog describes a boyhood filled with alcohol-fueled violence and the discovery that his mother was a lesbian, which she confirmed.

    “Because my mother was gay, I had a father who worried about me being gay and therefore took a little boy who had nothing but love and compassion in his heart and tried to make that little boy as mean and tough as possible,” Clark writes on his blog.

    He went to Oklahoma to live with his mother, Shirley, but at 15 he rejoined his father in Florida, who he said made him sell drugs on the streets of Jacksonville.

    The father, Ronald Wayne Clark Sr., is also in a Florida prison, serving a life sentence for killing his second wife.

    “His dad was an SOB, and I wasn’t the best mother, either,” Shirley Clark said. “I would do anything in the world to change how it came out.”

    Clark regrets going back to Florida.

    “I never should have left her. She kept her hand on me,” Clark says of his mother, who he says is the one person he knows still loves him.

    Running with a rough crowd in Yulee and growing up too fast, Clark worked at a lawn care business, drank and did drugs excessively. As a teen, speeding in his 1979 Buick Regal and swerving to avoid a tractor-trailer, he sideswiped a car on U.S. 17 in Jacksonville in which two people were killed.

    “I’m haunted by my past,” Clark wrote in a blog entry.

    Living on Death Row

    Clark is one of 397 people living on Florida’s Death Row.

    He’s one of three condemned inmates with a blog, along with Michael Lambrix’s “Death Row Journal” and James Hitchcock, who calls himself the “Average Joe on Death Row.”

    Union’s Death Row has its own Facebook page, too.

    Blogging didn’t exist in 1990 when Clark committed the crime that put him on Death Row: the shotgun killing of Ronald Willis, who had picked up a hitchhiking Clark and a friend, John Hatch.

    Hatch testified against Clark in exchange for a 25-year prison term.

    Clark was found guilty of stealing Willis’ truck and shooting him repeatedly in the head with a shotgun, tying cinder blocks to his body and dumping it in a river.

    Earlier, while on a drunken binge with three men in 1989, he pulled a shotgun on shrimp boat worker Charles Carter, wounding him. Court files show that Clark reloaded the gun and shot the 37-year-old Carter in the mouth, killing him, then rolled Carter’s lifeless body in a ditch and took his cash and his boots.

    “I shot him,” Clark told the Times/Herald during an interview in which he was dressed in an orange jumpsuit, shackled and in handcuffs. “He did nothing to me. I mean, nothing.”

    Carter’s younger brother Henry, in Liberty, N.C., wonders why Clark wasn’t executed long ago.

    “Personally, I think they should have given him a needle several years ago, and it should have been over,” Carter said. “It’s a waste of taxpayers’ money to keep him alive, and as far as him having access to the Internet, that should be against state law.”

    Clark agrees executions take too long. He cites the scheduled execution of Manuel Valle, 61, who has been on Death Row 33 years for the murder of a Coral Gables police officer. His execution has been delayed until at least Sept. 8.

    “They’re gonna kill this man for a crime that he done, what, 30 years ago, when he was probably a completely different person, okay?” Clark said. “If they was gonna kill him, they should have killed him right there on the spot, right there in the courthouse.”

    Death Row rules

    Death Row inmates can have a fan, radio, and a 13-inch TV with no cable access. But no law or rule outlaws blogging.

    In fact, the Department of Corrections is on record as saying blogging is legal as long as an inmate isn’t paid and is not seeking pen pals. Clark does neither.

    The Florida Death Row Advocacy Group asked the state for guidance last March on its plan to post “Faces of Death Row” stories online, written by Death Row inmates, and specified they would not be paid or would seek pen pals.

    “This would appear to comport with Department rules,” Kendra Jowers, a staff attorney for the prison system, was quoted as saying in the advocacy group’s newsletter.

    Corrections Secretary Edwin Buss, who resigned Aug. 24, was incredulous when he heard Clark had a blog.

    “He’s got to be stopped. He’s making accusations over the Internet,” Buss said. “This social media is causing a real problem.”

    But Buss said it was unrealistic to prevent Clark’s writings from reaching a friend with Internet access in a system with more than 100,000 inmates.

    “Do you know how many pieces of mail go in and out of the system?” Buss said. “We couldn’t hire enough staff to look at everything individually. We can’t read over every single piece of mail.”

    A handwritten note in Clark’s file from an assistant warden at Union, Brad Whitehead, dated Aug. 15, says: “The decision was made by executive staff that The Death Row Poet blog was seen as a security risk.”

    From his first-floor cell on P dorm, Clark writes of the acts that have kept him locked in a cage for nearly half his life.

    Week after week, month after month, he files posts complaining that he can’t seek pen pal correspondence, or that inmates are given too little recreation time or that prison food is bad or that correctional officers pick and choose which rules they will enforce.

    “I fight against the oppressive tactics of the Florida Dept. of Corrections (FDOC) and yes, I often stand to face retaliatory actions by tyrants within the FDOC and their tyranny that rains down upon me,” he writes in an Aug. 14, 2011, post titled “Oppressive Tyranny.” “You ask, why fight? ... But my question is, why not fight for change?”

    Union warden Barry Reddish denied Clark’s allegations that guards ransack inmates’ cells in retaliation for grievances or that lights are left on at all hours to deprive inmates of sleep.

    In other posts, Clark’s writings turn from angry to remorseful.

    “You can’t judge me, for I condemn myself. I don’t ask or want forgiveness because I don’t deserve it. I’ve made far too many mistakes in this life. I’ve made more mistakes than 10 men combined. I’ve hurt more people and caused more pain than you could ever imagine. I’ve been a disappointment from day one.”

    At times he seems to seek sympathy for the simple things in life that he’ll likely never experience again.

    “Leaning down to pet a cat or dog. The last time I petted a dog was over 20 years ago,” Clark writes. “The simplest everyday things that you take for granted and would never even consider the thought of being deprived of are things that I miss and yearn for, such as a simple cup of ice. I haven’t had ice in so long I’ve forgotten how cold it is.”

    Bad decisions

    At 6-feet, 4-inches and 220 pounds, Clark is healthy-looking, even after two decades on Death Row. He has forlorn-looking eyes and his light brown hair is parted in the middle. He keeps dozens of papers in a thick accordion file: grievances, letters, court documents, even a highly detailed sketch of the contents of his prison cell.

    He is currently serving 30 days in disciplinary confinement for taking too long to get dressed. He says the punishment was retaliation for his blogging and filing grievances.

    During an interview, Clark was asked if he thought he could make it on the outside if he were released from prison.

    “Would I let me out? No. That’s the honest-to-God truth,” Clark said. “Not me. Because I make too many damn bad decisions. That’s just the honest truth.”

    Until the governor signs his death warrant, he’ll keep writing instead.

    http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/09/0...#ixzz1X2GBOFzr

  4. #4
    Administrator Heidi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    32,385
    Seems to me they could classify inmates, and read mail accordingly. California has done a half way decent job. There is absolutely no reason a death row inmate should have a blog page!

  5. #5
    Passed away. Rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Far away from you...
    Posts
    151
    I hate those articles that focus on the offender's suffering, while making little or no mention of the real victims. I'm sorry he had a bad childhood, however, pity goes out the window when a person kills someone for their vehicle and boots. Furthermore, the decades he has spent on DR do NOT change what he did. If he is a 'changed' person, then so be it. However, he is still responsible for his crimes. That's the way I see it.

  6. #6
    Administrator Heidi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    32,385
    I think it is sad the FL DOC is back peddling and covering their tracks!

    I also hate the DR inmates' claims of mistreatment, and how their civil rights have been trampled upon. In Indiana they can have cats..Clark gets a television...I guess the next Supreme Court challenge will be for 1,899 channels, and the cable cords....and FLAT SCREENS!

  7. #7
    Junior Member Stranger
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    1
    lol...they have the flat screens ..remotes ....15 or so channels

    R C from what I understand from other inmates ... he's a problem causer.
    The "taking too long to get dressed" thing ... sounds about right ... to hold up the guards to get to the other inmates that are ALREADY to go... he pisses people off !

    FDR UPDATE on RC ....from what I learn on the inside ... he is in solitary / hole . His wife has been barred from entering the prison until further action.

  8. #8
    Administrator Moh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    11,788
    On August 14, 2014, Clark's habeas petition was DENIED in Federal District Court.

    http://docs.justia.com/cases/federal...0547/246567/59

  9. #9
    Administrator Moh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    11,788
    On November 4, 2014, Clark filed an appeal before the US Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit.

    http://dockets.justia.com/docket/cir.../ca11/14-15022

  10. #10
    Administrator Moh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    11,788
    On March 2, 2016, oral argument will be held in Clark's appeal before the Eleventh Circuit.

    http://www.ca11.uscourts.gov/sites/d...d%20public.pdf

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •