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Gregory L. Wilson - Kentucky Death Row
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Thread: Gregory L. Wilson - Kentucky Death Row

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    Gregory L. Wilson - Kentucky Death Row


    Deborah Pooley




    Facts of the Crime:

    Was sentenced to death October 31, 1988 in Kenton County for kidnapping and murdering Deborah Pooley of Kenton County. On May 29, 1987 Wilson and Brenda Humprey forced Pooley into the back seat of her car. Wilson raped the victim and later strangled her while the accomplice was driving. Wilson was arrested on June 18, 1987. He had previously served a prison sentence in Ohio on two counts of rape.

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    November 23, 2007

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) - A Kentucky death-row prisoner claims that giving a condemned inmate a sedative on the day of execution interferes with the drug cocktail used in lethal injections.

    The lawsuit by Gregory L. Wilson, 51, is a new challenge to Kentucky's execution method after the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear arguments from two other death row inmates who claim it amounts to cruel and unusual punishment.

    The high court has allowed just one execution since agreeing to hear arguments in January in a case that could affect how executions are carried out in 36 states.

    Wilson's new lawsuit challenges the method rather the constitutionality of Kentucky's execution procedure. Sedatives interfere with the effectiveness of sodium thiopental, a fast-acting barbiturate used during execution that renders an inmate unconscious, Wilson's attorneys claim in the challenge filed Wednesday in U.S. District court in Frankfort.

    The other two drugs used are pancuronium bromide, which causes paralysis, and potassium chloride, which causes cardiac arrest.

    Wilson's attorneys said the state gives a condemned inmate a Valium as a sedative _ even if the inmate refuses. An offer of Valium or another anti-anxiety drug are available in at least 19 of the country's 38 death penalty states.

    Wilson also claims that inmates cannot make an intelligent choice between lethal injection and electrocution because the state does not provide enough information about its protocol for each method. In Kentucky, inmates who were sentenced to death before 1998 can choose lethal injection or electrocution.

    Wilson also wants U.S. District Judge Karen Caldwell to force the state to show inmates its now-secret protocols for electrocution and lethal injection.

    In previous cases, the state has denied that lethal injection causes pain and that its protocol is unconstitutional. State offices were closed Friday and e-mail messages left at the Kentucky Justice Cabinet were not immediately returned.

    Wilson was condemned to death on Oct. 31, 1988, for his part in the kidnapping and murder of Deborah Pooley a year earlier. Calls to his attorneys were not immediately returned.

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    January 31, 2008

    Appeals Court Rejects Death Row Inmate's Claim

    A federal appeals court has rejected claims by a Kentucky death row inmate that he was forced to represent himself at trial.

    The U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals says Gregory Wilson effectively waived his right to an attorney by rejecting his court-appointed lawyer and agreeing to handle the case himself. Wilson was condemned to death in 1988 for his part in the kidnapping and murder of Deborah Pooley a year earlier.

    A co-defendant in the case is serving a life sentence. Wilson is also challenging Kentucky's use of lethal injection as an execution method in a separate lawsuit.

    (Source: The Associated Press)

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    September 30, 2009

    LOUISVILLE - A Kentucky inmate on death row for the kidnapping and murder of a Kenton County woman in 1987 on Wednesday lost a challenge to the state's lethal injection protocol when a federal judge found he attacked the law too late.

    U.S. District Judge Karen Caldwell ruled that death row inmate Gregory Wilson should have brought his lawsuit at least five years ago and possibly as much as 11 years ago, when the state adopted lethal injection as a method of execution.

    Wilson's lawsuit, filed in December 2007, challenged the use of sedatives given to an inmate before an execution, saying they interfered with the deadly three-drug cocktail.

    Wilson, 52, was sentenced to death in 1988 for his part in the kidnapping and murder of Deborah Pooley a year earlier in Kenton County. A co-defendant in the case, Brenda Humphrey, is serving a life sentence.

    Wilson and Humphrey forced Pooley into the back seat of her car on May 29, 1987. Wilson raped the victim and later strangled her while Humphrey drove. Wilson was arrested on two weeks later.

    Caldwell found that Wilson should have challenged lethal injection either in 1998, when the state adopted the method, or 2004, after he joined an inmate grievance over the procedure. Prison officials rejected the grievance.

    Caldwell's ruling closes another door on Wilson. The U.S. Supreme Court currently has an appeal from Wilson under consideration, but had not decided as of Wednesday whether to take the case.

    Shelley Catherine Johnson, a spokeswoman for the Kentucky Attorney General's office, declined immediate comment. Wilson's attorney, Louisville public defender Dan Goyette, did not immediately return messages seeking comment.

    Wilson's lawsuit challenged the method rather than the constitutionality of Kentucky's execution procedure. Sedatives interfere with the effectiveness of sodium thiopental, a fast-acting barbiturate used during execution that renders an inmate unconscious, Wilson's attorneys claimed.

    The other two drugs used are pancuronium bromide, which causes paralysis, and potassium chloride, which causes cardiac arrest.

    Wilson's attorneys said the state gives a condemned inmate a Valium as a sedative - even if the inmate refuses. An offer of Valium or another anti-anxiety drug are available in at least 19 of America's 38 death penalty states.

    Wilson, who previously served a prison sentence in Ohio for rape, claims he was forced to represent himself at trial after a dispute with his lawyers. The U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals rejected that claim, saying Wilson effectively waived his right to his court-appointed lawyer by agreeing to represent himself when a judge would not appoint a new attorney.

    Wilson also claims his right to a fair trial was violated because Humphrey was having a sexual affair with another Kenton County judge before and during the trial. The affair became public during Humphrey's appeals in 2001.

    Humphrey testified at trial and shifted much of the blame for the kidnapping and murder to Wilson. The court ruled that Wilson had an opportunity to question Humphrey, but declined to, even if he didn't know about the affair.

    Kentucky has executed three people since 1976. Harold McQueen was executed in the electric chair in 1997 for killing a convenience store clerk in 1981. Eddie Lee Harper was executed by lethal injection in 1999. Marco Allen Chapman was executed by lethal injection in November.

    http://nky.cincinnati.com/apps/pbcs....103/910010327/

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    October 7, 2009

    Prosecutors To Ask For Execution Date For Kenton Co. Killer

    A Kentucky death row inmate has lost his final appeal, prompting prosecutors to review his case and consider requesting a warrant to set an execution date.

    The Kentucky Attorney General's office is examining the case of 52-year-old Gregory Wilson, on death row since 1988 for his part in the kidnapping and murder of Deborah Pooley a year earlier in northern Kentucky. The review comes after the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused without comment to hear a final appeal from Wilson.

    Attorney General spokeswoman Allison Gardner Martin said there was no timetable for the review. She also didn't say when prosecutors might ask Gov. Steve Beshear to set an execution date.

    Wilson and a co-defendant were convicted in October 1988 for the May 29, 1987, kidnap and rape of Pooley in Kenton County. The co-defendant, Brenda Humphrey, is serving life in prison.

    Wilson and Humphrey forced Pooley into the back seat of her car. Wilson raped her and later strangled her while Humphrey drove. Wilson was arrested two weeks later.

    Wilson's cousin, Velvet Colvin Farmer of Cleveland, Ohio, said Wilson appears to have changed in prison to someone more spiritual and aware of the damage he has done. Farmer said Wilson deserves a second chance.

    "I think he shedded the old person away like an onion, just peeled it off and shed it away," Farmer told The Associated Press.

    The loss at the U.S. Supreme Court is the second one in a week for Wilson. A federal judge on Sept. 30 dismissed a lawsuit brought by Wilson challenging Kentucky's practice of giving a sedative to inmates on the day of execution. Wilson claimed the drug interfered with the three-drug cocktail used in lethal injections. A judge ruled Wilson raised the challenge too long after the protocol was adopted.

    Wilson, who previously served a prison sentence in Ohio for rape, claimed on appeal that he was forced to represent himself at trial after a dispute with his lawyers. The U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals rejected that claim, saying Wilson effectively waived his right to his court-appointed lawyer by agreeing to represent himself when a judge would not appoint a new attorney.

    Wilson, who served as his own attorney at trial, also claimed his right to a fair trial was violated because Humphrey was having a sexual affair with another Kenton County judge before and during the trial. The affair became public during Wilson's appeals in 2001. The court ruled that Wilson had an opportunity to question Humphrey, but declined to.

    Humphrey testified at trial and shifted much of the blame for the kidnapping and murder to Wilson.

    Kentucky has executed three people since 1976. The most recent was Marco Allen Chapman, who died by lethal injection in November. Since then, the Kentucky Supreme Court has been weighing a challenge brought by three inmates to the way the state adopted it's lethal injection protocol.

    http://www.wlwt.com/news/21218237/detail.html

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    August 25, 2010

    Beshear signs death warrant for Ohio man

    FRANKFORT, Ky (WDRB FOX41) -- A Sept. 16 execution date has been set for Kentucky inmate Gregory L. Wilson, who was convicted for a 1987 rape and murder of an Ohio woman.

    Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear signed a death warrant on Tuesday for the 53-year-old Wilson.

    Wilson was sentenced to die on Oct. 31, 1988, for his part in the kidnapping and murder of Deborah Pooley, a native of Hamilton, Ohio, a year earlier in Kenton County just across the Ohio River in northern Kentucky. A co-defendant in the case, Brenda Humphrey, is serving a life sentence.

    Kentucky has executed three people since the death penalty was reinstated in 1976. Harold McQueen was executed in the electric chair in 1997. Eddie Lee Harper was executed by lethal injection in 1999. Marco Allen Chapman was executed by lethal injection in November 2008.

    http://www.fox41.com/global/story.asp?s=13045070

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    September 25, 2010

    Execution date set for Gregory Wilson in 1987 rape, murder of Hamilton woman

    An Ohio man who was sent to Kentucky’s death row 22 years ago for the kidnapping, rape and murder of a Covington woman is scheduled to be executed on Sept. 16.

    Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear signed a death warrant Tuesday for Gregory L. Wilson, 53. Wilson received a death sentence in October 1988 for his part in the killing of Deborah Pooley, a 30-year-old worker at a Newport restaurant.

    Wilson’s death warrant was one of three that Attorney General Jack Conway requested, but a delay in the production of one of the drugs used in lethal injections prevented Beshear from signing the remaining two warrants.

    In March, the state ordered additional supplies of sodium thiopental, used in executions. State executioners have enough of the drug for only one execution, and its expiration date is Oct. 1, according to governor’s office.

    The only maker of the drug in the United States, Hospira, halted manufacturing several months ago because of a shortage of the drug’s active ingredient, according to the governor’s office. At least 33 other states, including Ohio, use the drug in the lethal-injection process.

    Kentucky’s execution protocol uses three drugs: sodium thiopental, a fast-acting barbiturate that renders an inmate unconscious; pancuronium bromide, which causes paralysis, and potassium chloride, which causes cardiac arrest.

    Wilson also has filed a federal lawsuit challenging multiple aspects of Kentucky’s execution protocol. That suit, which says the state uses a sedative on the day of execution that interferes with the drug cocktail used in lethal injections, is pending before the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati.

    Beshear said he signed Wilson’s death warrant because he had been on death row longer than the two other killers for whom Conway has requested death warrants. The other men are Ralph Baze, who killed two police officers in Rowan County, and Robert Foley, who killed two brothers in Laurel County.

    “I’m glad Mr. Wilson finally has a well-deserved date with justice,” Kenton County Commonwealth’s Attorney Rob Sanders said in a text message to The Kentucky Enquirer. “Hopefully there will be no further delay!”

    Sanders said he was 14 years old when Pooley’s body was found in a field near Indianapolis.

    Wilson was 30 when he killed Pooley, yet he already had a history of committing violent crimes. Only a few months before he had crossed the Ohio River to kill Pooley, Wilson was released on parole from an Ohio prison after two convictions for rape.

    Wilson kidnapped Pooley as she was getting out of her car late at night at her Covington apartment in May 1987.

    He used a knife to force Pooley into the back seat of her own car. Then Wilson’s female accomplice, Brenda Humphrey, drove the car to Indiana while Wilson raped Pooley in the back seat.

    Pooley begged Wilson for her life, according to testimony given by Humphrey. Pooley kept saying, “I don’t want to die.”

    Wilson then tied her hands with a lamp cord, robbed her and strangled her to death. Pooley’s naked and badly decomposed body was found in a wooded area near Indianapolis 17 days later.

    While authorities searched for the missing Pooley, a native of Hamilton, Wilson and Humphrey went on a shopping spree with Pooley’s credit card. They bought two pairs of women’s shoes, some hosiery, a man’s Seiko watch, a woman’s Gruen watch, cosmetics, clothing and enough gasoline to drive to Champaign-Urbana, Ill.

    The pair was not caught until Humphrey told a friend, who went to police.

    Wilson was arrested two weeks after the crime was committed

    Humphrey, 56, is currently serving a life sentence for her role in the killing.

    Wilson is one of 53 people on Kentucky’s death row at the state penitentiary in Eddyville. There have been three executions in Kentucky since the death penalty was restored in 1976. All three have been carried out since 1997.

    The last person executed in Kentucky was Marco Allen Chapman, who volunteered for death. He killed a 7-year-old girl and her 6-year-old brother six years ago in a crack cocaine-fueled attack on a family in Warsaw.

    http://news.cincinnati.com/apps/pbcs...704/308250054/

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    August 31, 2010

    Ky. inmate facing Sept. 16 execution asks judge to stop execution, hearing set for Wednesday

    A condemned Kentucky inmate has asked a judge to halt a scheduled Sept. 16 execution date.

    Attorneys for 53-year-old Gregory Wilson filed a motion Tuesday in Kenton Circuit Court asking a judge to stop the pending lethal injection. A hearing on the request is set for Wednesday at 3 p.m. in Kenton Circuit Court.

    Gov. Steve Beshear signed the death warrant on Aug. 25, saying Wilson's appeals had run their course and he could find no reason not to proceed.

    Wilson was sentenced to die Oct. 31, 1988 for his part in the 1987 kidnapping and murder of Deborah Pooley a year earlier in Kenton County in northern Kentucky, just across the Ohio River from her hometown of Hamilton, Ohio. A co-defendant in the case, Brenda Humphrey, is serving a life sentence.

    (Source: The Associated Press)

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    September 1, 2010

    Judge denies stay of Kentucky execution

    A Kentucky judge on Wednesday denied two requests to halt the impending execution of an inmate convicted of murder and rape, saying the arguments were too flimsy to support a stay.

    Kenton Circuit Judge Gregory Bartlett ruled that there was "overwhelming evidence" of Gregory L. Wilson's guilt and said that a DNA test of two decade-old evidence wouldn't prove his innocence.

    Bartlett also didn't find enough evidence to support a claim that Wilson, 53, is mentally retarded. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2002 that executing the mentally retarded is unconstitutional.

    Wilson, an Ohio native, is scheduled to die by lethal injection Sept. 16. He was convicted of raping and murdering popular restaurant employee Deborah Pooley. A co-defendant in the case, Brenda Humphrey, is serving a life sentence.

    Wilson and Humphrey forced Pooley, an Ohio woman who was then living in northern Kentucky, into the back seat of her car on May 29, 1987. Wilson raped and later strangled her while Humphrey drove.

    Wilson's attorneys from the Louisville public defender's office argued that an IQ test given to their client in 1971 showed an IQ of 62, well below the legal marker for mental retardation of 70. They also argued that bodily fluids collected from the crime scene, as well as the car used, have never been DNA tested.

    The judge found both requests lacking, calling Wilson's school records a "fairly thin offer of evidence."

    Wilson's attorneys indicated after the hearing they planned to appeal to the Kentucky Supreme Court.

    Defense attorney Leo Smith argued that hair and bodily fluids were used to bolster the credibility of the co-defendant and a snitch. While the hair is now missing, the bodily fluids are available and have never been tested.

    "It was critical to the Commonwealth's case," Smith said.

    Assistant Attorney General Heather Fryman told the judge that Wilson used Pooley's credit cards in multiple states after the murder. The bodily fluids and other evidence, even if they don't match Wilson, wouldn't make a difference, she said.

    "It still doesn't prove he didn't murder Ms. Pooley," Fryman said.

    Wilson has also intervened in a separate case brought by 3 other death row inmates challenging the way Kentucky adopted the lethal injection protocol.

    The attorney in that case, public defender David Barron, has asked a judge in Frankfort to enforce an injunction halting all executions the Kentucky Supreme Court. A hearing has been set for Sept. 8.

    The high court stopped executions in November because the protocol was not adopted properly, but the state has since readopted the 3-drug protocol.

    (Source: The Associated Press)

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    September 4, 2010

    Circuit Court Denies Challenge From Death Row Inmate

    A Circuit Court of appeals shot down challenges from a Kentucky death row inmate who faces lethal injection in less than two weeks.

    Friday US 6th Circuit Court of appeals in Cincinnati ruled that 53-year-old Gregory Wilson's challenge came too late when he filed suit in December 2008.

    Wilson said the use of sedatives given to an inmate before an execution interfered with the deadly three-drug cocktail.

    A jury sentenced Wilson to death in 1988 for the kidnapping, rape, and murder of Deborah Pooley.

    A co-defendant in the case, Brenda Humphrey is serving a life sentence.

    Wilson's execution is scheduled for September 16.

    http://www.wbko.com/news/headlines/102191204.html

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