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  1. #1
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    China Executions - 2011

    China on Wednesday executed three Filipinos who were convicted of drug smuggling despite last-minute appeals for clemency and political concessions by Philippine leaders, officials said.

    The three had not been told they would be executed Wednesday, although their sentences were promulgated early in the day, Philippine Consul Noel Novicio said. It was the first time that Philippine citizens were executed in China.

    China normally does not announce executions. Amnesty International says China is the world's biggest executioner, with thousands of convicts killed every year. The Philippines has abolished the death penalty.

    Novicio said Sally Ordinario-Villanueva and Ramon Credo met their families early Wednesday before they were put to death by lethal injection in Xiamen city in southeastern China. The third Filipino, Elizabeth Batain, was allowed to meet with her relatives hours ahead of her execution in southeastern Shenzhen city, he said.

    "They gave us only one hour (with her). They have no mercy," Ordinario-Villanueva's sister, Maylene Ordinario, said in a text message from Xiamen to her family in the Philippines.

    She said her sister had been blessed by a priest and "she said she wants to be forgiven for all her sins, but she insisted that she was a victim."

    "She asked us to take care of her children, to take care of each other and to help one another. I have not accepted what will happen. We are forcing ourselves to accept it, but I can't," she told Manila radio station DZBB.

    Neighbors, relatives and activists held overnight vigils at the homes of the condemned, offering prayers to the distraught family members. The dominant Roman Catholic Church, which opposes the death penalty, held a special Mass in Manila.

    The three were arrested separately in 2008 carrying packages containing at least 8 pounds (4 kilograms) of heroin. They were convicted and sentenced in 2009.

    The Philippine government's appeals for clemency included three letters from President Benigno Aquino III to his Chinese counterpart and a February visit to Beijing by the vice president which prompted China to postpone the executions by a month. The government said it was able to prove that a drug syndicate took advantage of the Filipinos.

    Jayson Ordinario, Ordinario-Villanueva's younger brother, said last week that his sister was hired as a cellphone dealer in Xiamen and was tricked into carrying a bag that had a secret compartment loaded with heroin, allegedly by her job recruiter.

    Aquino urged Filipinos to remain calm, saying the Philippines should respect China's laws.

    He said while the three were convicted of drug trafficking, they could also be considered victims of unscrupulous recruiters and drug traffickers, and of a society unable to provide enough jobs at home.

    "Our ultimate goal is to create a situation where people are not pressured to resort to these things, where they can find enough gainful employment in the Philippines," he added.

    China defended the executions.

    "Drug trafficking is universally recognized as a severe crime," Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu told reporters at a regular news conference Tuesday in Beijing. "In China, our judicial authorities handled the case independently and we grant equal treatment to foreign drug traffickers. ... China has fulfilled its international obligations in the process."

    She added, "We'd like to stress this is an isolated individual case. We would not like to see any impact on bilateral relations."

    Smuggling more than 50 grams of heroin or other drugs is punishable by death in China.

    In other moves reportedly related to the Filipinos' case, Aquino decided not to send a representative to the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony in December in Oslo, Norway, honoring a jailed Chinese dissident. Manila also deported to Beijing last month 14 Taiwanese facing fraud charges in China despite protests from Taipei.

    The plight of Filipinos overseas is an emotional issue in the Philippines and one of the pillars of the country's foreign policy. About 10 percent of the Philippines' 94 million people toil abroad to escape widespread poverty and unemployment at home.

    http://www.wtop.com/?nid=220&sid=2276708

  2. #2
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    China executes man who shot dead 4 police officers in rare case of gun violence

    A Chinese state news agency says a man who killed four policemen in a shootout in eastern China has been executed. It was a rare case of gun violence in a country where private firearms ownership is illegal.

    The official Xinhua News Agency says 51-year-old Liu Jianjun was put to death Tuesday. The Intermediate People's Court of Tai'an city in Shandong handed him the death penalty in March for murder and illegal possession of guns and ammunition.

    Xinhua says Liu and his brother shot and killed three police officers who were questioning them at home on Jan. 4. They then hijacked four cars before they were cornered by police. They killed one more police officer in the shootout. Reports say Liu's brother killed himself in the shootout.

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/can...?docId=6667766

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    China executes convicted killer after raising sentence

    Beijing - China has executed a convicted murderer after raising his suspended death sentence following a new conviction for attacking another prisoner, state media said on Wednesday.

    Xiao Mouping was executed on Tuesday in the southern city of Meizhou, Guangdong province, the local Yangcheng Evening News reported.

    Xiao was sentenced to death with a two-year suspension in 2008 after a court in Meizhou found him guilty of murder, the newspaper said without giving details of the murder case.

    In May 2009, one week after his punishment for taking a shower outside regulated hours, Xiao attacked a cellmate who he believed had informed prison authorities of the breach. The cellmate suffered minor injuries in the attack, the newspaper said.

    Xiao's execution followed a rare case of a court raising a suspended death sentence.

    Subject to good behaviour in prison during the two-year suspension, such sentences were normally commuted to up to 20 years in prison until recently. A new rule from May 1 allows courts to impose minimum sentences of 25 years for the most serious offenders whose suspended death sentences are commuted.

    China is believed to execute more people annually than the rest of the world put together, but statistics on death sentences and executions are kept secret.

    In an annual report in March, London-based Amnesty International said it recorded 527 reported executions in China last year, adding that China was believed to have executed thousands more.

    The government claims to have limited the use of capital punishment since introducing a mandatory review of all death sentences by the Supreme People's Court in 2007.

    But China retains the death penalty for dozens of offences, including drug trafficking, serious corruption and other non-violent crimes.

    http://www.monstersandcritics.com/ne...ising-sentence

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    Convicted student killer executed on Tuesday

    Yao Jiaxin, a music student who stabbed a woman six times to death after having struck her with his car, was executed in Xi'an, Shaanxi Province on Tuesday morning.

    The Higher People's Court of Shaanxi Province ruled that Yao was guilty of intentional murder on May 20 and upheld the verdict of capital punishment to the 21-year-old, rejecting his lawyer's appeal for a more lenient sentence.

    Yao killed Zhang Miao, 26 and a mother of a two-year-old boy, on October 22, 2010, when he saw the minor-injured victim taking down his license plate number.

    The murder case triggered heated extensive debate about whether Yao deserved the death penalty, whether the education system has failed in some of its aims, and if it is time for China to abolish the death penalty.

    http://china.globaltimes.cn/society/2011-06/662711.html

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    China executes corrupt Hangzhou and Suzhou officials

    China has executed 2 officials from eastern cities after convicting them of corruption.

    Xu Maiyong, a former vice-mayor of Hangzhou, and Jiang Renjie, who was vice-mayor of Suzhou, were put to death after their appeals were rejected.

    Officials said Xu and Jiang took almost 300m yuan ($46m; £29m) by embezzling and taking bribes.

    Corruption is one of the main causes of public discontent in China. Hundreds of officials are convicted every year.

    But only a handful are executed, and it is extremely rare for two officials to be put to death on the same day.

    Xu was said to be well known for his extravagant lifestyle - reports said investigators found gold bullion and expensive jewellery at his home.

    State-run Xinhua news agency reported that he used his power to interfere with project contracts and to help companies and people obtain land, promotions and tax breaks.

    The 52-year-old was sentenced to death in May for taking almost 200m yuan in bribes and embezzled funds.

    Jiang, 62, was given the death penalty in 2008 for taking more than 100m yuan in bribes.

    The 2 cases are not linked, but both men were earlier reported to be members of the Communist Party.

    Earlier this year, President Hu Jintao focused on corruption during his main speech to celebrate 90 years since the party was founded.

    He warned that corruption could cost the party the support of the people.

    Several high-profile officials have been executed in recent years - including Shanghai's former party boss, and a former head of the country's main nuclear firm.

    (source: BBC News)

  6. #6
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    China executes man for running over Mongol herder

    BEIJING (AP) — China has executed a truck driver for killing an ethnic Mongol herder in a case that sparked Inner Mongolia's largest demonstrations in 20 years.

    The official Xinhua News Agency said in a brief report that Li Lindong was executed Aug. 18. The report, dated Aug. 19, was posted to a regional news website and appeared to not be widely circulated.

    The herder, Mergen, who like many Mongols uses just one name, was killed May 10 while he and others were blocking the road through their village to protest noise and pollution produced by coal trucks transiting the grasslands. Police said Li ran over Mergen and then dragged his body for 160 yards (145 meters) before he died.

    His death and that of another Mongol in a clash with Chinese coal miners sparked protests across the sprawling northern pastureland by herders and students demanding justice and greater protection for Mongol culture and the nomadic herding lifestyle.

    Li was sentenced in June after a six-hour trial at the Intermediate People's Court in the region's Xilingol League. Fellow driver Lu Xiangdong, who had been sitting in the cab of Li's truck when he drove over the herder, was also convicted of homicide and sentenced to life in prison, state media said earlier.

    Two other people, Wu Xiaowei and Li Minggang, were convicted of obstructing justice and given three-year sentences for having blocked police who arrived at the scene, allowing Li Lindong and Lu to escape.

    Mass migration to the Inner Mongolia region by members of China's majority Han ethnic group and a booming mining industry have placed traditional ways of life under severe pressure.

    China is the world's largest enforcer of the death penalty and is believed to execute more people each year than the rest of the world combined, although the actual figure is a state secret.

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...e7106d3d7682f5

  7. #7
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    China executes Pakistani man on drugs charges

    China has executed a Pakistani man, Zahid Husain Shah, despite last-ditch appeals for clemency, his family says.

    Mr Shah, 35, was arrested in 2008 and was convicted last year of drug smuggling.

    He was put to death by lethal injection in Shanghai on Wednesday morning.

    Human rights groups had called on Beijing to stop the execution and urged Islamabad to take up appeals on his behalf. There was no comment from either government.

    Relatives were allowed one last meeting with Mr Husain at Shanghai Detention Centre on Wednesday morning.

    His cousin, Tasneem Fatima, told the BBC the family expects to travel back to Pakistan later this week, once his body has been returned to them.

    The last thing he told her was that he was innocent, she said.

    Four other Pakistanis arrested with Mr Shah were sentenced to life imprisonment.

    According to Mr Husain's relatives, he was framed for a crime he did not commit.

    "Executing someone for drug-related offences violates internationally accepted standards for imposing the death penalty," said Sam Zarifi, Amnesty International's Asia-Pacific director.

    The human rights group argues that no-one sentenced to death receives a fair trial in China, where thousands of executions for drug trafficking take place every year, more than the rest of the world combined.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-15006181

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    Murderer in SW China Executed after Retrial
    2011-09-29 17:54:05 Xinhua Web Editor: Zhangjin
    A man convicted of killing a young woman and her brother after his offer of marriage was refused, was executed Thursday in Zhaotong City of Southwest China's Yunnan Province, according to local court.

    The 29-year-old culprit Li Changkui was executed after the Supreme Court approved the death penalty over him.

    Li pled guilty to raping the 19-year-old Wang Jiafei before killing her and her three-year-old brother Wang Jiahong in the village of Yingge in May 2009 in Yunnan Province.

    The Provincial Higher People's Court sentenced Li to death after he was retried for his crimes in August in Zhaotong City, five months after the same court sentenced him to death with a two-year reprieve, which was considered by the public to be too lenient.

    http://english.cri.cn/6909/2011/09/29/1461s660697.htm

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    Man executed in China for raping teenage girls

    A man in China's eastern Zhejiang province was executed today for raping teenage girls.

    Investigators said Chen Weijun, the 42-year-old owner of a karaoke bar in the city of Lishui, raped 14 girls from a local junior high school from the second half of 2007 to February 2009.

    Chen was sentenced to death for the offenses by the Intermediate People's Court of Lishui on September 22, 2009.

    He appealed to the Higher People's Court of Zhejiang, which upheld the verdict in December last year, state-run Xinhua news agency reported.

    China has one of higest number of death sentences and executions in the world, according to figures complied by a top human rights watchdog.

    http://www.deccanherald.com/content/...g-teenage.html

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    Filipino drug mule executed today

    Posted by Online on Dec 8th, 2011

    Manila, Philippines – Not even a “prisoner swap“ or the exchange of two sentenced persons between countries would be able to save the Filipino drug mule who will be executed today in China, the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) said yesterday.

    DFA spokesperson Raul Hernandez said that there is no official “Transfer of Sentenced Persons Agreement“ or TSPA between the Philippines and China as of now.

    But one is already in the works, Hernandez revealed. However, even if it is signed on time, it still would not cover the case of the 35-year-old Filipino.

    The negotiations (for the TSPA) are ongoing, although it will not apply to death penalty cases,” Hernandez said, adding that only convicts with life sentences and “fixed terms” will be included under the agreement being negotiated between the Aquino administration and the Chinese government.

    http://www.tempo.com.ph/2011/filipin.../#.Tt_3SXJFvqE

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