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Egypt - Page 8
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Thread: Egypt

  1. #71
    Senior Member CnCP Legend Bobsicles's Avatar
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    Egypt: Commute Death Sentences for Rab’a Protestors

    Beirut – Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi should immediately commute the death sentences for 12 protestors, including prominent Muslim Brotherhood leaders who had been convicted in a grossly unfair mass trial for participation in the 2013 Rab’a sit-in that ended with security forces killing at least 817 protestors, Human Rights Watch said today.

    On June 14, 2021, the Court of Cassation, Egypt’s highest appellate court, upheld the death sentences for the 12 as well as long prison sentences for hundreds of other Rab’a case defendants. Egypt’s Criminal Procedure Code gives the president 14 days following the court ruling to pardon the defendants or commute the death sentences.

    The death sentences were among 75 handed down by a Cairo terrorism court in September 2018 following a mass trial of 739 defendants that began in December 2015. The Cassation Court commuted 31 death sentences to life imprisonment (the others had been sentenced in absentia). Most of the defendants had been arrested in the dispersal of the Rab’a sit-in. Authorities should release anyone prosecuted solely for participating in largely peaceful protests and retry defendants charged with violent offenses before a court meeting international fair trial standards, Human Rights Watch said. President al-Sisi should direct his government to halt Egypt’s escalating use of the death penalty.

    To date there has been no investigation of those responsible for carrying out the mass killings by security forces at Rab’a.

    “The Rab’a trial was a mockery of justice, so it is outrageous that the highest court has upheld these 12 death sentences,” said Joe Stork, deputy Middle East and North Africa director at Human Rights Watch. “President Sisi should seize this moment to void their execution and put an end to Egypt’s profligate use of the death penalty.”

    Those whose death sentences the Cassation Court upheld include senior Muslim Brotherhood leaders Mohamed al-Beltagy, 58, Osama Yassine, 56, Ahmed Arif, 40, Abdelrahman al-Barr, 58, and a prominent Brotherhood supporter and Islamic preacher, Safwat Hegazi, 56. Al-Beltagy was a member of the 2012 parliament, and Yassine was a minister in the government of former President Mohamed Morsy, a senior Brotherhood leader who died in detention in 2019. The 12 men whose death sentences were confirmed could face execution imminently if President al-Sisi does not act.

    The charges against the defendants in the mass trial ranged from involvement in violent protests to the murder and attempted murder of several police officers, soldiers, and members of the public during the six-week sit-in in July through August 2013.

    The Cassation Court also upheld the prison sentences for hundreds of other Rab’a case defendants, including life sentences for the Brotherhood’s Supreme Guide, Mohamed Badie, and lawyer Essam Soltan, deputy leader of the moderate al-Wasat Party, and a 10-year prison term for Osama Morsy, the late president's son.

    The full court decision is yet to be released. The mass trial before the terrorism court was chaotic and marred with abuses at all stages. The trial was postponed several times for years because no courtroom could accommodate all the defendants. Like other mass trials, this one failed to establish individual criminal responsibility and was heavily based on unsubstantiated allegations by National Security Agency officers. Like in dozens of terrorism cases in recent years, the hearings took place inside an Interior Ministry facility. Defendants were often jammed inside a courtroom cell with sound-proof barriers that make it hard for observers to see or hear them and prevented them from properly interacting with judges. Many defendants were held in the notorious Scorpion Prison, where inmates are deprived for months or years at a time from seeing or communicating with their lawyers and family members, severely undermining the right to defense.

    A relative of Mohamed al-Beltagy told Human Rights Watch that he has not received a single visit from his family or lawyers since March 2017. On August 13, 2020, Essam el-Erian, another senior Muslim Brotherhood leader in the case, died in Scorpion Prison in suspicious circumstances after purportedly suffering a heart attack. El-Erian, 66, had complained to judges in court sessions in 2017 and 2018 about prison conditions and said the Interior Ministry had prevented him from receiving treatment after he contracted hepatitis C in prison. Security forces forced his family to bury him almost secretly.

    At least 22 of those handed down prison terms were children at time of arrest and were prosecuted alongside adults, in violation of international law.

    The Egyptian army overthrew and arrested former President Morsy on June 30, 2013, on the heels of mass anti-Brotherhood protests. Morsy supporters then staged large protests throughout Egypt and gathered in two main squares in Cairo, Rab’a and al-Nahda. Human Rights Watch documented six incidents in which security forces unlawfully fired on masses of largely peaceful protestors between July 3 and August 16, 2013, killing at least 1,185 people. Human Rights Watch said these mass killings likely constituted crimes against humanity and required an international investigation.

    Several official statements and reports acknowledged the police used excessive force in the dispersal. The prime minister who supervised the dispersal, Hazem al-Beblawy, said in response to the 2014 Human Rights Watch report that “anyone who committed a mistake … should be investigated.” No such investigations have taken place in the eight years since the massacre.

    On March 6, 2014, Egypt’s National Council for Human Rights (NCHR) released a report on the Rab’a dispersal saying that some protestors had been armed but that there was a “disproportionate response” and “excessive use of force by security forces” and security forces failed to maintain a safe exit for protestors to leave or to provide medical aid for the wounded.

    Earlier, in December 2013, interim President Adly Mansour established a fact-finding committee to collect “information and evidence” on the events that accompanied the June 30 protests. The committee released an executive summary in November 2014 in which it largely blamed protest leaders for the casualties in Rab’a but admitted that security forces failed to target only people who were armed. Immediately following the dispersal, Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim said that only 14 guns were seized among the protestors. The full report is yet to be made public.

    Both the committee and the NCHR demanded that Rab’a victims who “did not participate in violence” be compensated. The NCHR also called for an independent judicial investigation.

    In July 2018, al-Sisi approved Law No.161 of 2018 on the “treatment of the armed forces’ senior commanders,” which grants these officers “immunity” from prosecution or questioning for any event between July 3, 2013, and January 2016, unless the Supreme Council of Armed Forces gives permission.

    Under President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, Egypt has become among the top three countries in numbers of executions and death sentences globally, according to Amnesty International.

    Human Rights Watch opposes the death penalty in all circumstances. In 2017, Human Rights Watch called on President al-Sisi to issue a moratorium on the use of the death penalty in view of the sharp rise in the number of death sentences. According to Amnesty International, Egyptian authorities have executed at least 51 men and women in the first half of 2021. In October 2020, Human Rights Watch documented the execution of 49 men and women by Egyptian authorities in just 10 days.

    “Egypt should immediately halt any further executions, particularly of those convicted in grossly unfair trials,” Stork said. “To move forward, Egypt needs to address the crimes committed by security forces, including Rab’a and the mass killings of protestors.”

    https://www.hrw.org/news/2021/06/18/...ba-protestors#
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  2. #72
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    Edited out redundant info

    16 executions carried out over single week in Alexandria, Cairo

    Sixteen people on death row have been executed in Egypt over the past week, part of a pattern of an increased use of the death penalty by Egyptian authorities in recent years that has alarmed human rights groups.

    Nine death sentences were carried out on Sunday at the Cairo appeals prison, a maximum security facility in Cairo known for holding prisoners on death row, with authorities killing eight men and one woman convicted in criminal trials, the privately owned Al-Watan news outlet reported.. The bodies were reportedly transferred to the Zeinhom morgue where their families will be able to collect them for burial.

    On Monday, prison authorities at the Borg al-Arab Prison in Alexandria executed seven people from the Alexandria, Beheira and Daqahlia governorates, all of whom were convicted for murders, according to Al-Watan.

    Earlier in June, Egypt’s highest appeals court also upheld death sentences handed down to 12 defendants in a case prosecuting senior leaders and figures connected to the Muslim Brotherhood in relation to the violent dispersal of the Rabea al-Adaweya sit-in in 2013. After the Court of Cassation confirmed the 12 death sentences, nine human rights organizations demanded an immediate moratorium on capital punishment in Egypt, citing what they described as “the country’s utter lack of an independent and impartial judiciary willing to uphold minimal standards of due process and justice.”

    The number of trials ending in death sentences has shown “a steady increase” over the past three years, according to research published by the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR). EIPR has also noted that the number of death sentences being carried out remains high: in October, authorities executed 53 people, the largest number of death sentences to be carried out in a single month over the last five years.

    Over 100 crimes are punishable by death under Egyptian law, including a host of drug and harm-related offenses, as well as terrorist offenses and infractions set out in the Code of Military Justice. EIPR maintains that the death penalty “constitutes a grave violation of human rights, does not achieve the desired deterrence, and is not enjoined by Islamic law (shari’a) as commonly perceived,” according to a 2018 report on the issue.

    https://www.madamasr.com/en/2021/06/...xandria-cairo/
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  3. #73
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    Egypt executes student who was 'tortured to confess' to attempted assassination of senior officer

    Moataz Hassan was reportedly forcibly disappeared and tortured before confessing to being involved in the explosion targeting a police officer in 2018

    Middle East Eye

    Egyptian authorities have carried out the death penalty against a university student after his conviction in the case of the assassination of a high-ranking police officer in Alexandria in 2018, a rights group said citing his family.

    According to the Egyptian Network for Human Rights, the Egyptian Prisons Authority on Sunday executed Moataz Mustafa Hassan, a 27-year-old engineering student, inside the Cairo Appeal Prison. His body was transferred to the Zeinhom Morgue in preparation for handing it over to his family for burial.

    On 14 June 2020, in a final judgment, the Emergency State Security Criminal Court, headed by Counselor Mohamed Sherine Fahmy, sentenced three defendants, including Hassan, to death by hanging, for their conviction in the case of the attempted assassination of the former Alexandria Governorate security director, Major General Mustafa Al-Nimr in March 2018.

    An explosion targetting Nimr's convoy in the Sidi Gaber area in Alexandria led to the killing of two of his guards, according to the interior ministry. The case involves 11 defendants, nine of them have been tried in absentia.

    On 22 April, security forces stormed Hassan’s home in the King Mariout area in Alexandria, assaulted him and dragged him in the street in front of eyewitnesses. Then his mother and younger sister were detained and assaulted to pressure him to confess.

    According to the ENHR, the three were tortured inside one of the security headquarters in Alexandria.

    The group said that Hassan was forcibly disappeared for a period of two months until the Egyptian Ministry of Interior announced in a statement on 28 June 2018 his arrest, along with another defendant.

    "Investigators threatened him that they would rape his mother and sister in front of him if he didn't confess," Ahmed Attar, executive director of ENHR, told Middle East Eye.

    He explained that the prosecution held the investigation in the absence of Hassan's lawyer, in violation of the constitution.

    "Throughout the trial, Hassan has provided evidence of the torture, with visible marks on his body, and his family lodged numerous complaints regarding his enforced disappearance, but all of that was disregarded by the judge," Attar added.

    Spike in executions

    The reports of the execution of Hassan have triggered angry reactions by Egyptian human rights advocates, who accused authorities of torturing him to record a video confession prior to his conviction.

    Some have shared his pictures, before and after his detention, showing apparent signs of torture.

    Translation: Egypt today executed the student Moataz Mostafa Hassan, 25 years old! Moataz has been handed a final verdict on charges of the attempted assassination of the Alexandria security director. Below you can see pictures of Moataz before and after his detention. Perhaps you will realise why he made the confession against himself!

    Since the rise to power of President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi in Egypt following the overthrow of his predecessor Mohamed Morsi in 2013, the country has seen a wave of repression against political dissidents, sparking outrage from human rights organisations.

    The widespread use of the death penalty has become a major focus for concern, as hundreds of people have been sentenced to death since 2013. So far, at least 51 men and women have been executed in 2021 alone.

    In 2020, the number of executions in Egypt tripled from the year before, making the country the third-most prolific executioner after China and Iran.

    Many of those executed have been described by rights groups as prisoners of conscience detained over their opposition to the Sisi government.

    According to the Geneva-based Committee for Justice rights group, at least 92 Sisi opponents have been executed since 2013, and final death sentences have been issued for 64 others who may be executed at any moment.

    Human rights groups have repeatedly criticised the process by which death penalties are handed to defendants.

    Torture is commonplace in Egyptian prisons, and many confessions extracted under torture end up used as the main basis for prosecution.

    Death sentences are often handed down following mass trials lasting just days.

    https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/e...police-officer

  4. #74
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    Egypt hands death penalty to two brothers who killed father for 'raping sister'

    The pair, who admitted to the offence, acted because their father allegedly raped their sister

    By The New Arab Staff

    An Egyptian court has handed death sentences to two brothers for taking their father's life, Gulf News reported on Saturday, citing local news.

    The Zagazig Criminal Court in Sharqia Governorate also sentenced the man's three daughters and wife to two years in prison for assisting in the crime.

    The brothers, who admitted to the offence, acted because their father allegedly raped their sister, according to the Emirati outlet.

    It was claimed that the daughters drugged him, sending him unconscious. The sons subsequently hit and strangled their father, killing him, the news report said.

    The Director of Sharkqa Security received a report last year from the Director of Criminal Investigation, saying that police had found a body and they believed there had been foul play.

    An Egyptian police probe found the dead man's wife and sons had "premeditatedly" ended his life, local reports said.

    It was not clear whether the brothers' allegations against their father over the rape of their sister was investigated by authorities.

    Sexual violence against women is rife in Egypt. In a 2010 survey of 1,010 women by the Egyptian Center for Women's rights, 98% of foreign women and 83% of native women said they had been sexually harassed in Egypt and two-thirds of men said that they had harassed women.

    https://english.alaraby.co.uk/news/e...-killed-father
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  5. #75
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    March 11, 2022

    Egypt executes seven men after trials 'marred by torture and lack of due process'

    Sisi's government is accused of turning the country into the third worst executioner in the world, after Iran and China

    Middle East Eye

    Egyptian authorities executed seven men on Wednesday and Thursday in connection with “politically motivated” cases, and after a legal process marred by torture and lack of evidence, a rights group has told Middle East Eye.

    The executions raise the number of political death penalty verdicts implemented since President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi came to power in 2014 to 105 people.

    According to the Geneva-based Committee for Justice (CFJ), Egyptian prison authorities executed four men on Tuesday, roughly a year after the country’s top appeals court upheld their sentences.

    The four men, along with 32 other defendants, had been charged with joining a banned group and with the killing of eight police officers in Helwan on 9 January 2016.

    The CFJ said that four of the accused were subjected to extrajudicial killings during their arrest.

    "The silence of the international community on human rights violations in Egypt, especially the right to life, emboldened the authorities to continue to carry out mass death sentences issued by exceptional trials that lacked the minimum elements of a fair trial," the CFJ said in a statement on Friday.

    It also said that the executed defendants had been subjected to torture and enforced disappearance from the date of their arrest until they were officially brought before the public prosecution.

    All the defendants said they were subjected to severe torture inside the headquarters of the National Security Agency, which was used to extract confessions that formed the basis for their referral to trial.

    But neither the prosecution nor the court paid any attention to the violations, and the torture allegations have not been investigated, CFJ executive director Ahmed Mefreh told MEE.

    Mefreh added that the defendants had no lawyers representing them in the first investigation session, in violation of the Egyptian constitution.

    https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/e...ck-due-process

  6. #76
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    Egypt hands down death sentence for priests murder

    An Egyptian court on Wednesday sentenced to death a man accused of the murder last month of a Coptic priest in the Mediterranean city of Alexandria, judicial sources said.

    The Alexandria courts ruling is subject to approval by the mufti of the republic.

    The sources said the defendant was found guilty of voluntary homicide after a court-ordered psychological assessment found him responsible for his actions.

    Father Arsanios Wadid died of his wounds in hospital after being stabbed on April 7 on Alexandrias seafront promenade as he accompanied a group of young parishioners.

    The assailant was grabbed by passers-by and handed over to police, who detained him in a psychiatric hospital because of doubts over his mental health. Coptic Christians, the largest non-Muslim religious minority in the Middle East, make up roughly 10 to 15 % of Egypts predominantly Sunni Muslim population of more than 100 million.

    The community has long complained of discrimination and underrepresentation.

    In February, however, Egypt for the 1st time swore in a Coptic judge to head its constitutional court.

    Copts were targeted in a series of sectarian attacks after the military in 2013 deposed Islamist president Muhammad Mursi. Such attacks focused largely on remote villages in southern Egypt.

    (source: arabnews.com)
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    - Rev. Richard Hawke

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  7. #77
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    Egypt court sentences 10 brotherhood members to death

    Egypts Emergency Supreme State Security Criminal Court on Tuesday sentenced 10 members of the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood group to death for murdering security men and sabotaging public properties.

    The perpetrators killed, on different occasions from 2013 to 2015, 6 policemen and wounded 25 officers, security men, and civilians.

    They also exploded 11 police vehicles and destroyed 3 police stations, the court said.

    It gave a life sentence, which is 25 years in Egypt, to 56 militants.

    It also gave a 15-year-jail term to 52 others convicted of the same crimes.

    The court acquitted 43 defendants as innocents.

    The convicted militants were members of Helwan Brigades, which is a group formed after the ouster of the late President Mohamed Morsi in 2013 for targeting security men and premises.

    Most brotherhood leaders, members and supporters are serving jail terms.

    Many have received appealable death sentences and life imprisonment on charges varying from inciting violence and murder to espionage and jailbreak.

    (source: Peoples Gazette)
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    "There are some people who just do not deserve to live,"
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    There are lots of extremely smug and self-satisfied people in what would be deemed lower down in society, who also deserve to be pulled up. In a proper free society, you should be allowed to make jokes about absolutely anything.
    - Rowan Atkinson

  8. #78
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    Egypt sentences man to death over high-profile femicide

    An Egyptian court on Tuesday sentenced a man to death for the murder of a student after she rejected his advances, a judicial source said, in a case that sparked widespread outrage.

    Mohamed Adel was found guilty of the "premeditated murder" of fellow university student Nayera Ashraf after he confessed to the crime in court, the source told AFP.

    The verdict, handed down in Mansoura north of Cairo after the trial opened on Sunday, will now be referred to the grand mufti, Egypt's top theological authority -- a formality in death penalty cases.

    A video that went viral earlier this month appeared to show Ashraf being stabbed outside her university in Mansoura on June 19.

    She had previously reported her fears of attack to the authorities, and the prosecution had said messages from the accused "threatening to cut her throat" were found on her phone.

    The verdict was met with celebrations in front of the courthouse in Mansoura, videos published by local media showed.

    The crime has triggered widespread anger in Egypt and beyond, and was followed by a similar on-campus shooting of a female student in Jordan a few days later.

    Jordanian police said Monday that the man suspected of killing Iman Irshaid had "shot himself" after refusing to turn himself in.

    Meanwhile another case began making headlines in Egypt after news that the body of TV presenter Shaimaa Gamal had been found, nearly three weeks after her husband had reported her missing.

    Gamal's body was found following a tip-off from someone who confessed to their "participation in the crime", a prosecution statement said late Monday.

    The prosecution ordered the arrest of her husband, who is a senior judicial official, according to the statement.

    All three cases have caused an outpouring of anger on social media, with users demanding justice and decrying incidents of femicide in the Arab world.

    Some have called for the perpetrators to be sentenced to death, while others say men must "learn to take no for an answer".

    Egyptian preacher Mabrouk Attia also sparked outrage, including among women's rights defenders, after suggesting that Ashraf would not have met the same fate had she been veiled.

    Patriarchal legislation and conservative interpretations of Islam in Egypt have contributed to severely limiting women's rights.

    Nearly 8 million Egyptian women were victims of violence committed by their partners or relatives, or by strangers in public spaces, according to a United Nations survey conducted in 2015.

    (source: france24.com)
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    "There are some people who just do not deserve to live,"
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    There are lots of extremely smug and self-satisfied people in what would be deemed lower down in society, who also deserve to be pulled up. In a proper free society, you should be allowed to make jokes about absolutely anything.
    - Rowan Atkinson

  9. #79
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    Egypt executes two men over killing of Maadi woman in 2020

    Ahram Online

    Egyptian authorities executed two men on Thursday who were convicted of killing a 24-year-old woman in Cairo’s Maadi suburb in October 2020 in an incident that stirred public uproar in Egypt at the time.

    Walid Abdel-Rahman and Mohamed Osama were executed for killing Mariam Mohamed in October 2020.

    Mohamed, 24, was found dead in a Maadi Street after being killed in a robbery on 13 October 2020.

    According to the prosecution, Mariam died when her head hit a parked car after two men in a microbus approached her and snatched her bag.

    When the victim clung onto her bag, the two offenders ran her over with the intention of killing her and escaped with the bag, according to the prosecution.

    The perpetrators were later found in possession of a firearm.

    In December 2020, a criminal court sentenced the two defendants to death.

    A third defendant, the vehicle owner, who was charged with assisting the two men in committing the crime by providing them with his car, was exonerated by the court.

    The cassation court rejected the appeal of the defendants upheld the death sentence.

    https://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsCon...adi-woman.aspx

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