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  1. #11
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    Scott Dekraai indicted in Seal Beach salon shooting

    The man accused of killing eight people in a Seal Beach hair Salon in the largest mass murder in Orange County history was indicted Tuesday by a grand jury.

    Scott Dekraai, 42, was indicted on eight counts of murder with special circumstances and one felony count of attempted murder in connection with the Oct. 12 rampage at Salon Meritage, the Orange County district attorney's office said.

    Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty in the case, which shocked the normally tranquil seaside community after Dekraai allegedly walked into the crowded salon where his ex-wife worked and sprayed it with gunfire.

    Photos: Seal Beach salon shooting rampage | Full Coverage



    He had been involved in a bitter custody dispute with his ex wife, Michelle Fournier, over their 8-year-old son, according to court records. Dekraai was intent on killing Fournier and others who were inside the salon, prosecutors said.
    Dekraai was wearing a bulletproof vest under his clothing and had armed himself with three high-powered handguns, two of which were used to hit his victims at close range, according to prosecutors.

    He is accused of shooting some of his victims multiple times, stopping to reload while people lay dying on the ground, prosecutors say.

    Dekraai is scheduled to be arraigned Wednesday afternoon on the indictment at the Central Justice Center in Santa Ana. He pleaded not guilty in November at an earlier arraignment after charges were initially filed by the district attorney.

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lano...-shooting.html

  2. #12
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    Salon Shooting Trial Set For One Year After the Massacre

    The death penalty case of the man accused of killing eight people at the Salon Meritage in Seal Beach is set for trial Oct. 15, a year and three days after the shooting that stands as the deadliest mass murder in Orange County’s history.

    Scott Evans Dekraai, 42, the alleged Salon Meritage gunman, appeared in court today for a pretrial hearing during which the trial date was set. He is scheduled to be back in court in April for a motion hearing during which the prosecution and defense are expected to wrangle over whether the grand jury transcripts in the case should be sealed.

    “The defense has filed a motion to keep the grand jury transcript sealed. The people intend to file a motion prior to the April 13th hearing in opposition,” said Farrah Emami, spokeswoman for the Orange County District Attorney’s office.

    The people have the right to the grand jury testimony, and this case should be as transparent as any other, said Emami.

    The reason the Dekraai’s defense team would want to bar the testimony from becoming public record is to prevent it from possibly prejudicing the jury pool. When Dekraai was first arraigned two days after the shooting, his attorney hinted that a change of venue motion might be filed on the grounds that Dekraai could not get a fair trial in Orange County. If such a motion is filed, it would likely be filed closer to the October trial date.

    Earlier this month, Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas convened a grand jury to have Dekraai indicted in an effort to expedite the trial. The move, said Rackauckas, was designed to speed up the trial in order to bring justice to the families of the victims. Family members of the eight people Dekraai is accused of killing have attended each court hearing the case since the shootings.

    Deputy District Attorney Scott Simmons, however, said it was doubtful the trial will begin then. Prosecutors are hoping to get the case before a jury sometime next year, Simmons said.

    Rackauckas said he anticipates that it would take a little over two months to try the case. Dekraai is currently represented by a public defender, but his earlier attorney hinted that a change of venue motion or insanity defense could play a role in the case.

    Dekraai is accused of walking into the Salon Meritage on Oct. 12 and shooting and killing his 48-year-old ex-wife Michelle Fournier before opening fire on others inside the business. Also killed in the shooting were the salon's owner, Randy Lee Fannin, 62; Victoria Ann Buzzo, 54; Lucia Bernice Kondas, 65; Laura Lee Elody, 46; Christy Lynn Wilson, 47; Michele Daschbach Fast, 47, and David Caouette, 64. Hattie Stretz, 73, was also shot, but survived. Dekraai remains jailed without bail.

    http://losalamitos.patch.com/article...r-the-massacre

  3. #13
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    Judge to Consider Unsealing Records in Salon Shooting Indictment

    A hearing is set for this morning to determine whether to make public the grand jury transcripts for the man accused of murdering eight people by opening fire in a Seal Beach salon last year.

    An Orange County Superior Court judges is scheduled to hear motions on whether to unseal the transcripts from the grand jury proceedings in the death penalty trial of Scott Evans Dekraai.

    It’s possible that the hearing will be rescheduled for another day, and it’s also likely that both the prosecution and defense will be opposed to unsealing the transcripts from the testimony that convinced a grand jury to indict Dekraai on multiple counts of murder.

    However, there are those affected by the case who aren’t opposed to seeing the transcripts unsealed. Relatives of some of the victims told Patch they don’t see the need to keep the transcripts sealed as the painful details of the details of that day have already been made public.

    The indictment process, which is done in secret, was done to speed up the trial. A grand jury indictment negates the need for a preliminary hearing, which can take months of preparation and several days of testimony leading up to the actual trial.

    After listening to closed-door testimony, the grand jury indicted Dekraai on eight counts of murder with special circumstances and one count of attempted murder. If convicted, Dekraai faces the death penalty.

    Nine people were shot and eight died in the Oct. 12 shooting at Salon Meritage. The shootings, which took less than two minutes, produced the highest death toll of any mass murder in Orange County history.

    http://losalamitos.patch.com/article...ing-indictment
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  4. #14
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    Seal Beach shootings: Dekraai taped in cell

    Authorities covertly recorded more than 100 hours of jailhouse conversations between the Huntington Beach man charged with killing eight people in a Seal Beach salon and an informant, court documents reviewed by the Register reveal.

    Deputy Public Defender Scott Sanders contends in a pretrial motion that prosecutors and police installed an audio-recording device in Scott Evans Dekraai's one-man cell Oct. 19, 2011, one week after Dekraai was charged with the deadliest mass killing in Orange County history, and recorded his conversations for six days. The informant, in custody after a weapons conviction, was in a nearby cell.

    Sanders said in his motion that he is not questioning the legality of the secret recordings but is seeking to determine whether the informant initiated the conversations or enticed Dekraai into talking about his meetings with his own attorneys, the shootings or his background.

    If the conversations were enticed or pre-arranged, Sanders contends in his motion, it could be a violation of Dekraai's rights to legal representation because they took place after Dekraai was represented by a lawyer.

    Sanders said he seeks additional information about the informant so he can consider filing a motion to suppress the recordings from being used as evidence at Dekraai's trial, the court documents show.

    Among other things, Sanders seeks details about any other cases on which the informant cooperated with law enforcement, any benefits he received from prosecutors and any reports or notes about his communications with Dekraai.

    The informant, Sanders wrote, "has received substantial and unusual benefits" from the prosecution in exchange for his cooperation, while his investigators have been thwarted in their attempts to locate the inmate.

    Assistant District Attorney Dan Wagner, one of two prosecutors assigned to the Dekraai case, said Tuesday that he does not plan to call the inmate as a witness in Dekraai's trial, and therefore the defense is not entitled to more details about his background.

    But Wagner also said he plans to use some of the 132 audio recordings as evidence during Dekraai's death-penalty trial, including one in which Dekraai seems to brag about the killings.

    "The recordings speak for themselves," Wagner said.

    Prosecutors will file a brief later this week opposing Sanders' motion for discovery, Wagner said. Superior Court Judge Thomas Goethals has scheduled arguments on the motion for Jan. 25.

    Sanders originally filed his motion for discovery last week. He refiled it Tuesday with the last name of the informant and personal identifying details deleted or blacked out. The Register is not publishing the name of the informantbecause of potential danger to the inmate.

    Veteran defense attorney George Peters, who has defended death penalty cases in Orange County since 1981, agreed Tuesday that the issue is not whether the prosecution secretly taped Dekraai but whether the informant induced him to start talking.

    "It is my understanding that you don't have an expectation of privacy from your jail cell," Peters said. But in a death penalty trial, Peters added, a defense attorney is obligated "to fully explore whether an informant induced a client to discuss his case."

    Dekraai, 44, is charged with eight counts of murder in the midday massacre at Salon Meritage on Oct. 12, 2011.

    Witnesses told police that he walked into the salon shortly after 1 p.m. and immediately shot stylist Michelle Fournier, 47, his ex-wife, after arguing with her earlier in the day by phone over child custody.

    He then shot Christy Lynn Wilson, 47, Fournier's friend and colleague, and salon owner Randy Fannin, 61, witnesses said, before shooting others at random. Victoria Ann Buzzo, 54; Lucia Bernice Kondas, 65; Laura Lee Webb Elody, 46; and Michele Fast, 47, were shot and killed.

    Harriet Stretz, 73, was shot and wounded. David Caouette, 64, was shot and killed while sitting in his vehicle in the parking lot outside the salon as the shooter was fleeing, police said.

    A Seal Beach patrol officer stopped and arrested Dekraai as he drove away from the salon. "I know what I did," Dekraai told the officer, a search warrant affidavit said.

    Dekraai was indicted on eight counts of murder in January 2012. He has pleaded not guilty.

    http://www.ocregister.com/news/dekra...t-sanders.html
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  5. #15
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    Seal Beach Massacre Suspect Pepper-Sprayed in Jail

    The man accused in the mass shooting at a Seal Beach salon was placed under mental observation after an altercation at an Orange County jail.

    Guards said they had to subdue Scott Dekraai with pepper spray after he became disruptive Saturday night.

    Authorities say Dekraai, who was screaming and throwing things, charged at deputies, who had to wrestle him to the ground.

    Dekraai, 44, is charged with eight counts of murder in the midday massacre at Salon Meritage on October 12, 2011.

    He was indicted in January 2012 and has pleaded not guilty.

    Dekraai could face the death penalty if he’s convicted.

    Among the victims in the salon shooting was Dekraai’s ex-wife, stylist Michelle Fournier, 47, with whom he was involved in a bitter custody dispute.

    Read more: http://ktla.com/2013/01/29/seal-beac...#ixzz2JP7h4aQh
    Read more at http://ktla.com/2013/01/29/seal-beac...xyyZd4ZJFou.99
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  6. #16
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    Trial Again Delayed in Seal Beach Salon Massacre

    Trial for a man accused in the worst mass killing in Orange County history was delayed again today, angering the families of victims.

    Scott Evans Dekraai, 43, was scheduled to go on trial Nov. 4, but Orange County Superior Court Judge Thomas Goethals today rescheduled it for March 24. Dekraai is next due in court for a pretrial hearing Jan. 17.

    "I'm not happy about it, obviously," said Paul Wilson, husband of 47- year-old Christy Wilson, who was killed in the Oct. 12, 2011, massacre at Salon Meritage in Seal Beach.

    "It's very unfair to us," Wilson said, referring to the families of the victims. "We're approaching two years and the evidence is pretty clear."

    The delay is owed to the prosecution seeking the death penalty for the defendant, Dekraai's attorney, Deputy Public Defender Scott Sanders said in court. Defense attorneys have offered a guilty plea and multiple life sentences if prosecutors would take the death penalty off the table.

    "We politely declined their offer," Assistant District Attorney Dan Wagner said after the hearing. "This case among all cases deserves the ultimate punishment."

    Even capital punishment won't achieve "real justice," Wagner said.

    "His acts are so heinous and he caused so much damage" that the only appropriate disposition is death row, Wagner said.

    Wilson said he doubts the trial will begin in March.

    "The real healing process won't happen until this trial," Wilson said. "And what we're hearing today it's going to take two to three years."

    Wilson said he has made progress in his efforts to seek legislation that would provide a cooling-off period for gun owners from accessing their weapons during a contested divorce. Wilson has consulted with Connecticut lawmakers he met with following the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting that killed 20 children and six adult staff workers who are interested in pursuing federal domestic violence gun legislation.

    Wilson has been pursuing Christy's Law in California, which was inspired by the circumstances in the Dekraai case. The defendant was involved in a bitter child custody dispute with his ex-wife, Michelle Fournier, when he went on the alleged rampage.

    Dekraai is charged with eight counts of murder, with a special circumstance allegation of multiple murders, and one count of attempted murder.

    Dekraai is accused of walking into the salon and gunning down 48-year- old Fournier, before opening fire on others inside the business.

    Killed in addition to Wilson and Fournier were salon owner Randy Lee Fannin, 62; Victoria Ann Buzzo, 54; Lucia Bernice Kondas, 65; Laura Lee Elody, 46; Michele Daschbach Fast, 47; and David Caouette, 64.

    Hattie Stretz, 73, survived her injuries.

    http://fountainvalley.patch.com/grou...salon-massacre
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  7. #17
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    Seal Beach shootings: Some victims' families want death penalty dropped

    Relatives of eight people killed at Salon Meritage in 2011 have been meeting informally with prosecutors to voice their frustrations about the delay in the trial of the man accused in the rampage.

    Families of victims of Orange County’s deadliest mass shooting have been meeting informally with prosecutors – including District Attorney Tony Rackauckas – to voice their frustrations about the delays in getting the case to trial, some asking them to re-evaluate seeking the death penalty against the man accused in the rampage.

    Relatives of eight people killed during the midday massacre at the Salon Meritage in Seal Beach said they talked about the devastating impact of returning to court ...

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  8. #18
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    DA Continuing Death Penalty Plans Against Dekraai

    Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas will continue to seek the death penalty for the man accused of committing the worst mass killing in Orange County history despite objections from some victims' relatives.

    The relatives of the victims have been meeting with Rackauckas and his staff since last month when they learned that the trial of Scott Evans Dekraai, 43, would be delayed again from November to March 2014.

    Some of the victims' relatives think it would speed up the legal process if Rackauckas would accept a plea bargain proposal from defense attorneys for Dekraai to plead guilty with a guarantee of life in prison without parole.

    "There are certain crimes that are so heinous there's no other punishment that comes close to serving justice," said Rackauckas' chief of staff, Susan Kang Schroeder.

    "Some of the family wanted to talk to the district attorney and illustrate their frustration, and we understand their frustration, and we're frustrated the defense keeps up with delay tactics," Schroeder said. "We've been ready to go to trial for a long time."

    Messages left with Scott Sanders of the Orange County Public Defender's Office, who is representing Dekraai, were not immediately returned.

    "Unfortunately, the defense gets to dictate by telling the court that they're not ready when it goes to trial," Schroeder said.

    While the opinions of family members are important, prosecutors also must consider the community's wishes as well, Schroeder said.

    Paul Wilson, husband of 47-year-old Christy Wilson, who was killed in the Oct. 12, 2011, massacre at Salon Meritage in Seal Beach, said he understands Rackauckas' intentions, but disagrees.

    "I don't want to sound like I'm not backing his decision, but I can't say that I agree with it," Wilson told City News Service.

    Wilson suspects that even if prosecutors are successful that Dekraai will die in prison awaiting execution anyway, like most defendants on death row.

    "He'll just sit in a prison cell anyway and die there," Wilson said. "He's never getting out of jail either way, and that's my problem with the whole thing. If we got a death penalty verdict and they put him to death then absolutely that's the right thing to do, but he's going to sit in a prison cell because California doesn't put people to death."

    Prosecutors should accept the defense's plea bargain offer because it would spare the families of going through a lengthy trial that would lead to many of the relatives having to testify, Wilson said.

    Wilson was disappointed Rackauckas never asked family members their opinion of the defense's plea bargain offer.

    "It's going to be devastating to my family to have to go through this," Wilson said.

    Dekraai is charged with eight counts of murder, with a special circumstance allegation of multiple murders, and one count of attempted murder.

    Dekraai is accused of walking into the salon and gunning down his ex- wife, 48-year-old Michelle Fournier, before opening fire on others inside and outside the business.

    Killed in addition to Wilson and Fournier were salon owner Randy Lee Fannin, 62; Victoria Ann Buzzo, 54; Lucia Bernice Kondas, 65; Laura Lee Elody, 46; Michele Daschbach Fast, 47; and David Caouette, 64.

    Hattie Stretz, 73, survived her injuries.

    http://losalamitos.patch.com/groups/...gainst-dekraai
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  9. #19
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    D.A. ran illegal snitch operation in O.C. jail, attorneys say

    By Paloma Esquivel

    Attorneys for the man charged with killing eight people in a Seal Beach salon three years ago have accused Orange County prosecutors and sheriff’s deputies of running an unconstitutional jailhouse informant operation that ensnared their client and other inmates.

    Scott Dekraai’s public defenders say that the district attorney’s office oversaw an “unchecked and lawless custodial informant program” which resulted in systemic constitutional violations and kept defense attorneys in the dark about the so-called jailhouse snitches, the Los Angeles Times reports.

    Dekraai faces the death penalty for allegedly walking into Salon Meritage on Oct. 12, 2011 and opening fire, killing his ex-wife and seven others in the county’s deadliest shooting.

    Deputy public defenders Scott Sanders, Frank Ospino and Lisa Kopelman outlined the allegations in a 505-page motion filed earlier this month, charging that the prosecution cannot be trusted to put on a fair trial.

    The attorneys are asking the court to dismiss the death penalty allegation against Dekraai and bar the district attorney’s office from prosecuting the case.

    Assistant Dist. Atty. Dan Wagner called the allegations “scurrilous and unfounded” and said he would respond to the specifics in court.

    “It is filled with untruths,” he said.

    A hearing on the motion is scheduled Friday in Orange County Superior Court.

    Families of the salon victims have grown impatient with constant delays in the trial, but Sanders said that much of the delay stems from his office’s efforts to investigate the use of jailhouse informants. The motion is based on an examination of thousands of pages of records and hundreds of hours of recordings which the court had ordered turned over to the defense last year.

    Evidence of Dekraai’s guilt is overwhelming: He was arrested as he drove from the scene of the midday shooting and later confessed to investigators. The main issue in the case has been whether he should be sentenced to die for the crime.

    Days after Dekraai was arrested and taken to the Central Jail Complex in Santa Ana, he was placed next to a prisoner referred to in court documents as Inmate F. A few days later, Inmate F told deputies that Dekraai had been talking about the shootings and gave him detailed descriptions of the crime, according to court documents.

    Dekraai’s attorneys contend that Inmate F was a well-known informant who had offered information in numerous cases and that Dekraai was deliberately placed in a cell next to him so that the informant could coax him into talking.

    In a prior case, Inmate F wrote to a deputy and asked to be moved closer to certain inmates so that “I could work these dudes,” and weeks before Dekraai was arrested, Inmate F wrote to the same deputy: “Garcia, I love my little job I got,” according to the motion.

    Prosecutors said Inmate F came forward because he was concerned about the seriousness of Dekraai’s crimes and was not looking for any consideration in his own cases. The informant is facing a possible three-strike sentence for drug, street terrorism and weapons charges dating back to 2006.

    One day after the inmate came forward, prosecutors placed a recording device in Dekraai’s cell and recorded him continuously for 132 hours, according to court documents.

    “In order to accept the proposition that only a few days after his arrest in the biggest mass murder in Orange County history, Dekraai was coincidentally rehoused in a cell next to one of the government’s most trusted and successful informants, the Court would have to ignore common sense,” the motion says.

    Prosecutors have said they don’t plan on calling inmate F to testify in the case against Dekraai but do plan on using the recordings made after the informant came forward. The recordings, which have not been made public, capture Dekraai discussing the crime, his mental state, meetings with former attorneys and conversations with jail mental health staff, according to court records.

    Once criminal proceedings have been initiated against a person, government efforts to deliberately elicit statements from them about that crime, including using informants to get them to talk, can violate a defendant’s 6th Amendment right to counsel, experts say.

    “If they’re planting the informants or the government has any role in placing them, then essentially the questioning of the defendant, picking their brains, is almost as if the police themselves were in the jail cell. It’s equal to legal interrogation and you have a right to counsel,” said Kathleen “Cookie” Ridolfi, professor at Santa Clara Law and a co-founder of the Northern California Innocence Project.

    Dekraai’s attorneys say that the informant program went well beyond Dekraai’s case and includes multiple high-profile cases, including the case of Daniel Patrick Wozniak, the onetime theater actor who now faces the death penalty for allegedly killing two Orange Coast College students in 2010.

    http://www.hbindependent.com/news/tn...,2464124.story

  10. #20
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    Dekraai's Mass Murder Trial to Be Split into Two Parts

    The trial of a man accused of carrying out the worst mass killing in Orange County history will be split into two parts while a defense attorney presses allegations of misconduct by prosecutors in an effort to spare his client from a possible death sentence, a judge ruled today.

    Orange County Superior Court Judge Thomas Goethals scheduled a June 9 trial date for Scott Evans Dekraai. Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty, which would require a penalty trial phase, during which a jury is asked to recommend death or life in prison without the possibility of parole for a defendant.

    Goethals said if Dekraai is convicted of carrying out the killings, there would be a delay before a penalty phase is held, and a different jury would be selected for that portion of the case.

    If the judge agrees with a defense attorney and removes the death penalty as a sentencing option, there will be no need for a penalty phase.

    Defense attorney Scott Sanders contends that prosecutors have violated the rights of Dekraai and other defendants who are awaiting trial through the use of jailhouse informants.

    Separating the two phases of the trial will speed up the legal process, something victims' family members complained about again today to Goethals. Several relatives of the victims told the judge they are frustrated with Sanders' attempts to save his client from the ultimate punishment.

    Sanders told Goethals that his client "has listened to family" members, "and he's asked us to agree to the separate trials."

    If the District Attorney's Office "forgoes the death penalty," Dekraai would agree to plead guilty to life in prison without the possibility of parole and would waive any appeals, Sanders said.

    Goethals expects the guilt phase of Dekraai's trial would take just a couple of weeks.

    "By the beginning of July, most likely, we'll have verdicts," Goethals said.

    "I've got to be ecstatic about a June 9 trial date," said Paul Wilson, whose wife was among the eight killed at Salon Meritage in Seal Beach on Oct. 12, 2011.

    Wilson scolded Sanders in court this morning.

    "Shame on you, Mr. Sanders, shame on you," Wilson said. "As far as I'm concerned, you stand in the same shoes as that coward (Dekraai) next to you."

    Butch Fournier, whose sister, 48-year-old Michelle Fournier, was among those killed, said he was "all for the bifurcation" of the trials of his former brother-in-law.

    Fournier added, however, that he dreads a "double trial," and that "it scares the hell out of me" to have to hear the details of the killings.

    Goethals defended Sanders' motions, but said he understood how frustrated the victims' families have become.

    "The legal process is a difficult one and it is painstaking," Goethals said. "And I'm not going to patronize any of you and say I know how you feel, because I don't ... I don't blame any of you for how you feel, but the record should be clear. All the lawyers in this case are ethical and experienced ... None of this is frivolous. None of this is disingenuous."

    Assistant District Attorney Dan Wagner began testifying this afternoon about how his office has investigated Sanders' allegations of government misconduct in the use of jailhouse snitches, who gathered evidence against other inmates, including Dekraai.

    Much of Sanders' questioning involved a meeting Wagner and other top prosecutors had with Deputy District Attorney Erik Petersen, who defense attorneys have accused of withholding evidence in trials involving state and federal crackdowns on jail violence stemming from a war over control of the Mexican Mafia in Southern California.

    Wagner testified that Petersen received evidence about one of the jailhouse snitches after a trial, which was not turned over to a defense attorney as the prosecutor is obligated to do. Wagner and others met with Petersen for a couple of hours a few weeks ago to discuss the allegations against him in Sanders' motion, Wagner testified.

    During the trial, defense attorney Rob Harley complained that he was only given four pages of notes from the informant but suspected there were more pages. After Harley's client was convicted, Petersen received 196 pages of notes, which were not turned over to Harley as required, Wagner testified.

    Petersen blamed federal investigators who are jointly working on the crackdowns on jail violence, saying they did not turn over their evidence to state prosecutors, Wagner testified.

    "That doesn't excuse it, you still have to turn it over," Wagner said.

    When Sanders asked Wagner if he believed Petersen's explanation, the prosecutor said federal prosecutors are "inclined to be protective of their information ... sometimes they're arrogant when it comes to state cases and state court."

    Wagner testified that he did not think Petersen's mistakes were malicious.

    "I think there's some (evidence exchange) problems in his cases, but I don't think they were born ... out of an intent to do wrong, an intent to break the rules," Wagner testified.

    Goethals recently came to the same conclusion when Petersen failed to turn over evidence to defense attorneys in a pending jail beating case, but the judge still kicked the prosecutor off of the case.

    Wagner recommended to his supervisors that Petersen appears to have too heavy a caseload, which could explain the problems with turning over evidence to defense attorneys.

    Wagner also explained that he just hasn't had enough time to thoroughly go over the defense's allegations regarding the jail violence cases and has mostly focused on the allegations against the team prosecuting Dekraai.

    Sanders also grilled Wagner on why more notes weren't taken during his meetings with Petersen about the defense's allegations. Goethals ordered Wagner and his office to turn over those notes from the meetings by tomorrow morning, when Wagner will continue testifying.

    Killed at Salon Meritage in addition to Christy Wilson and Dekraai's ex- wife were the salon owner Randy Lee Fannin, 62; Victoria Ann Buzzo, 54; Lucia Bernice Kondas, 65; Laura Lee Elody, 46; Michele Daschbach Fast, 47; and David Caouette, 64.

    Hattie Stretz, 75, was shot but survived her injuries.

    http://missionviejo.patch.com/groups...into-two-parts
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