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If You’re Ever Murdered . . .
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Thread: If You’re Ever Murdered . . .

  1. #1
    Administrator Heidi's Avatar
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    If You’re Ever Murdered . . .

    An easy way to let murder victims speak from beyond the grave.

    By Dennis Prager

    I’d like to offer a simple proposal that, if enacted, could generate a great deal of a most precious resource: moral clarity.

    It concerns the death penalty.

    Opponents of capital punishment argue that the state has no right to take a murderer’s life. Apparently, one fact that abolitionists forget or overlook is that the state is acting not only on behalf of society, but also on behalf of the murdered person and the murdered person’s family.

    In order to make this as clear as possible, here is my proposal: Americans should be able to declare what they want the state to do on their behalf if they are murdered. Those who wish the state to keep their murderer alive for all his natural years should wear, let us say, a green bracelet and/or place a green dot on their driver’s license or license plate. And those who want their convicted murderer put to death can wear a red bracelet and/or have a red dot on their license. Just as I have a pink “donor” circle on my driver’s license signifying that, in case I die, I wish to provide my organs to help keep some other person alive, so I wish to make it known that if I am murdered, I do not want my murderer kept alive a day longer than legally necessary.


    There are a number of reasons for recommending such a policy.

    First, as noted, it is clarifying for the individual. It is easier to take a position in the abstract than when it hits home. It is one thing to oppose the death penalty when others are killed, but if you have to decide what happens if it is you who is murdered, the mind focuses with greater clarity. Before deciding which color to choose, let a woman imagine herself raped and then stabbed to death. And let her further imagine that if this happened, she now has some say in determining what will become of the person who did this to her. She is no longer a silent corpse. Her voice will be heard, perhaps even be determinative of his fate.

    Likewise, the woman who truly opposes death for any murderer, no matter how heinous and sadistic his actions, will also now have the ability to speak from beyond the grave. No matter how much her family may seek the death penalty, they will have no say. Any woman — or man — who passionately opposes the death penalty under every conceivable circumstance can now help ensure that at least in his or her own case, a murderer’s life that might have been taken would now be preserved. There is no more direct way to give abolitionists the right to have a say over the fate of a murderer.

    Second, such a choice gives great power to the individual. Abolitionists who live in pro-death-penalty Texas, for example, can now have a say on a matter of enormous moral magnitude. And pro-death-penalty citizens living in states that have either legally or de facto abolished the death penalty regain a sense of power over their lives (or, to be precise, their deaths). The whole American experiment has been predicated on giving individuals as much control over their own lives as possible. But this has been undermined in the last fifty years as the state has gotten ever more powerful. Giving murder victims a say over their murderer’s fate would be a small but symbolically significant step in Americans’ reasserting the importance of the individual. It is hard to imagine a more appropriate arena than in determining what happens to the person who murdered you.

    As dark as thoughts of one’s own murder may be, we all think about it. And I don’t think I speak only for myself in saying that I would rest just a tiny bit easier knowing that if I were murdered, my murderer might not be allowed to watch TV, read books, exercise, develop relationships with people inside and outside of prison, surf the Internet, sing, listen to music, have his health-care needs addressed, and be visited by loved ones — while I lay in my grave.

    And for those opposed to the death penalty, they, too, will be able to rest a bit easier. They will be assured that even men who came to their home, raped all the females in the family, and then set the house on fire with the family inside — as happened in Connecticut a few years ago — would never be killed by the state.

    Third, it would be interesting to see if these color-coded bracelets and licenses had any effect on who gets murdered. Clearly, when the murder is a crime of passion, it is hard to imagine that the would-be murderer would stop himself upon noticing a red bracelet or a red dot on a license plate. But crimes of passion are generally not, in any event, punished by death. On the other hand, in murders that could be capital crimes, it is possible (not necessarily likely, but possible) that a would-be murderer (or, even more likely, his accomplice, if there were one) might just rethink going ahead with the crime.

    Fourth, choosing which color bracelet or dot would not only forces people to confront their own consciences, it would undoubtedly engender deep discussions with others. To cite but one example, it can surely help singles who are dating. If you’re against the death penalty, and your date drives up with a red bracelet and/or dot on his license plate, you’ll either have a far deeper discussion than you would otherwise have had at dinner, or you’ll spare yourself the time and effort of a date that will probably lead nowhere.

    These are some of the arguments for the plan. I can’t think of one good argument against it — unless you’re an abolitionist who is fearful of seeing red.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/articl...-dennis-prager

  2. #2
    Administrator Heidi's Avatar
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    I would wear a red bracelet. Provocative piece.

  3. #3
    Administrator Michael's Avatar
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    I think a tatoo would be much better. If I would murder you (or someone else (what I never will do)) I would replace your (any) red bracelet.

    It´s not a good idea to let the victim decide about the form of punishment. It´s the crime which should be sentenced and the the facts should led to a death sentence (or not).

  4. #4
    Senior Member Member Diggler's Avatar
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    One of the reasons for the state doing the execution is that is done without fear or favour.
    Imagine a parent having the job of killing the person who killed their child. Easy but prolonged.
    The law exists to be a servant of the civilised and a balance for justice.

    I just wish the law had more balls.

    Diggler

  5. #5
    golden
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    My wife is Anti Dp,but their is no way I could let someone get away with harming her!I would want and eye for eye by way of the state!

  6. #6
    Administrator Michael's Avatar
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    In this case you´re personal affected. Justice has to be unbiased and offer fair trials (and the DP ) for everyone. Self-justice or justice just for people with relatives who care isn´t acceptable.

    But if one would harm one of my siblings I won´t care about laws and would opt for personal justice. :stung: I think this is the difference between a discussion and being personaly affected.

  7. #7
    Administrator Heidi's Avatar
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    Murdered father's beliefs keep killer son from death penalty



    BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WWAY) -- It may seem hard to believe, but the personal beliefs of a murdered father may have kept his son and killer off death row today.

    The Brunswick County District Attorney's Office says it's one of the most unique cases it's ever seen. John Heller pleaded guilty to second degree murder of his own father. He avoided the death penalty because his father, an attorney, was against it.

    "We met with the family and decided to take that off the table, and after talking to the family we wanted to help go with their wishes, and their wishes were to be able to spend some time with him after he got out," Assistant District Attorney Karen Richards said.

    It was an emotional day in the courtroom for the Heller family. John Heller, 23, admitted shooting and killing his own father last year.

    "The victim leaves behind his wife, a daughter, a grandchild, and we've also met with the brother of the victim," Richards said.

    Deputies arrested Heller in May 2011 after a cab driver called and said Heller did not pay his fare. They found Heller on the porch of his Winnabow home with a shotgun. A blood trail in the house led to his father Tom's body and a message written in blood.

    Prosecutors say the murder happened after the father and son had a fight inside the house.

    "It seems like one of those things you would see on 'Law & Order' or 'CSI,'" Richards said. "The way it played out it was a little sensational."

    John Heller faces at least 20 years in prison. He also pleaded guilty to robbery with a firearm, which added to his sentence.

    We tried to talk to members of the Heller family at the courthouse today but they did not want to speak on camera.

    http://www.wwaytv3.com/2012/06/14/mu...-death-penalty
    An uninformed opponent is a dangerous opponent.

    "Y'all be makin shit up" ~ Markeith Loyd

  8. #8
    jaycube
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    If this happen then i am sure lots of persons get caught after a murder,

  9. #9
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    Did any of the victims have have any say on how they died. Should the murderers have any say. I am quite sure they begged for their lives and were shown no mercy. My son is extremely dangerous and on death row in Arizona. I pray no other mother has to go through what I have. Criticize me for this "I will sleep when my son is dead" no mother should have to worry who her son will kill next. If you knew my son you would understand.

  10. #10
    Administrator Heidi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by holly50 View Post
    Did any of the victims have have any say on how they died. Should the murderers have any say. I am quite sure they begged for their lives and were shown no mercy. My son is extremely dangerous and on death row in Arizona. I pray no other mother has to go through what I have. Criticize me for this "I will sleep when my son is dead" no mother should have to worry who her son will kill next. If you knew my son you would understand.
    You will not be criticized on this website!
    An uninformed opponent is a dangerous opponent.

    "Y'all be makin shit up" ~ Markeith Loyd

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