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  1. #11
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    Joking aside, execution by elephant = BRUTAL!

    Elephants were widely used across the Indian subcontinent and south-east Asia as a method of execution. The English sailor Robert Knox, writing in 1681, described a method of execution by elephant which he had seen while being held captive in Sri Lanka. Knox says the elephants he witnessed had their tusks fitted with "sharp Iron with a socket with three edges". After impaling the victim's body with its tusks, the elephant "then tear it in pieces, and throw it limb from limb".

    The 19th century traveller James Emerson Tennent comments that "a Kandyan [Sri Lankan] chief, who was witness to such scenes, has assured us that the elephant never once applied his tusks, but, placing his foot on the prostrate victim, plucked off his limbs in succession by a sudden movement of his trunk." Knox's book depicts exactly this method of execution in a famous drawing, "An Execution by an Eliphant".




    Writing in 1850, the British diplomat Sir Henry Charles Sirr described a visit to one of the elephants that had been used by Sri Vikrama Rajasinha, the last king of Kandy, to execute criminals. Crushing by elephant had been abolished by the British after they overthrew the Kandyan kingdom in 1815 but the king's execution elephant was still alive and evidently remembered its former duties. Sirr comments:

    During the native dynasty it was the practice to train elephants to put criminals to death by trampling upon them, the creatures being taught to prolong the agony of the wretched sufferers by crushing the limbs, avoiding the vital parts. With the last tyrant king of Candy, this was a favourite mode of execution and as one of the elephant executioners was at the former capital during our sojourn there we were particularly anxious to test the creature's sagacity and memory. The animal was mottled and of enormous size, and was quietly standing there with his keeper seated upon his neck; the noble who accompanied us desired the man to dismount and stand on one side.

    The chief then gave the word of command, ordering the creature to 'slay the wretch!' The elephant raised his trunk, and twined it, as if around a human being; the creature then made motions as if he were depositing the man on the earth before him, then slowly raised his back-foot, placing it alternately upon the spots where the limbs of the sufferer would have been. This he continued to do for some minutes; then, as if satisfied that the bones must be crushed, the elephant raised his trunk high upon his head and stood motionless; the chief then ordered him to 'complete his work,' and the creature immediately placed one foot, as if upon the man's abdomen, and the other upon his head, apparently using his entire strength to crush and terminate the wretch's misery.
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  2. #12
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    Sri Lanka: "Wide consensus in favour of death penalty"

    Following lengthy debate and lobbying of ideas, the public, Cabinet and Members of Parliament have reached a common belief that the death penalty should be implemented for child molesters and drug lords, Cabinet Spokesman and Media Minister Keheliya Rambukwella said.

    According to Minister Rambukwella the death penalty has been in existence in Sri Lanka for a long time but the Executive had not signed the death warrant since 1977.

    Now interviews are going on to recruit hang men and the salaries of hangmen are being discussed.

    Discussions are going on in the Cabinet for required amendments to the law if implementing the death penalty. Minister Rambukwerlla pointed out that there is a strong opinion in the country for the death penalty to be implemented against child molesters and drug lords.

    But, there is no evidence anywhere in the world to suggest that the implementation of the death penalty reduce crimes.

    If this is true, the US should be free of any type of crimes. "Politicians belonging to all parties are involved in child exploitation incidents and crimes but only the politicians who belong to the UPFA are being highlighted because they belong to the government.

    "It is good that the entire country has come to a common opinion on implementing the death penalty," Minister Rambukwella added.

    Source: Sri Lanka News, July 20, 2012


    Sri Lanka: Young mother sentenced to death over drug charges


    July 18, 2012: In Sri Lanka, a young mother who was convicted under the Dangerous Drugs Act for possessing heroin, was sentenced to death by High Court Judge Padman Surasena.

    The accused in this case is a resident of Dehiwala. She was charged under two counts relating to heroin.

    The Narcotics Bureau prosecuting said that 2.78 grames of heroin was found in her possession. After the sentence it was heart rendering to witness the woman accompanied by her husband hugging her infant boy with tears steaming down her face.


    Source: dailynews.lk, July 19, 2012
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  3. #13
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    Great news for the pro DP crowd to see another nation join the group!

    And Sri Lanka is very much a democracy like America and Europe!

  4. #14
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    The gallows: Sandbag tested, hangmen on verge of recruitment

    Such was the report in the ‘Island’ recently. The death penalty is a contentious subject. The present actual context as always counts for much in determining the issue. What the times have to tell us is alarming. No one denies that this country is in the throes of a lawlessness crisis. Rank, status and position do not count today where crime is concerned. Drug barons, murderers, hooligans, extortionists, swindlers, commision crows, all corrupt to the core, occupy high seats whether at national or provincial level. They are not only tolerated but even embraced and kept pinned to their seats as being vote pullers. One such notorious hoodlum was reportedly being used as a go-between in negociations between the government and a group of striking academics. In other words such refuse of decent society are even considered as necessary elements in the practise of governance.

    Twenty top ranking provincial politicians were involved in rape and murder over the last three months. The Kahawatte multiple murders, with politics as backdrop, all following similar patterns send shivers down our spines. Tourist women are not spared as seen in the murder of one of them in a hotel of the south, with umpteen cases of molestation. Teen aged school girls are easy prey for use and abuse. The lilfeless bodies of some are later dumpted under abandoned culvets.

    One such accused provincial politician even had the guts to utter threats to the media when led handcuffed to courts. and that in view of all television onlookers. ‘Who’ and ‘where’ do not instill respect. The judiciary is held in contempt (one could argue with sound logic and reason that they have asked for it with ‘toe the line’ judges abounding in all courts). There was, a few years ago, an opinion poll conducted in the streets of Colombo regarding the re-introduction of the death penalty. Absolutely every one interrogated answered positively and vehemently in favour. Some even insisted that executions should be held in public…on the Galle Face esplanade. Such is the fear psychosis combined with disgust and loathing that has gripped the people.

    The issue of the death penalty is contentious and highly debated. The most proliferated argument is that the death penalty does not dissuade criminals. Satistics are quoted in support. Generally speaking, the countries of South-East Asia where people move about in security are those where the death penaty prevails and harsh punishments are meted out for crime. I am thinking of Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia and of course, Singapore. Some countries with entrenched religions, and highly sophisticated ones at that, are the worst offenders especially as regards sex oriented crimes: India and Sri Lanka (which boasts of all four major religions) are classic examples.

    Our professors of morality proceed with the contention that religion should serve as deterrent. And also what about our 2600 year old civilization? it is argued. Unfortunately both, in spite of the sound and light effects they continue to generate, are spent forces as regards the inner renewal of the country’s citizens. What is forgotten is that religion and civilization go hand in hand. They are two sides of the same coin thriving on one another. When one falls so does the other. In Sri Lanka both have floundered to such an extent that putting them back seems as arduous as reconstructing Hympty Dumpty. Have not leading Buddhist monks stated in public that mere ‘bana’ preaching this country cannot be put on the right track. Harping on religion and civilization today is like tailoring invisible clothes for naked emperors.

    Does the death penalty dissuade potential murderers? Those who say ‘no’ come up with perennial arguments already enshrined in classical works such as the writings of J – P. Sartre and Albert Camus who enunciated theses of ultra-humanism. Both were, it must be remembered extreme-left thinkers. As a counter argument suffice it to restate what Mr.Wijedasa Rajapakse once said on television: that when the inmates of death row were made aware of imminent attempts to re-introduce the gallows, they all suffered overnight from acute diarrhea.

    This phenomenon caused by morbid fear has been translated into Sinhales as ‘goo bhaya’. So who says the death penalty does not beget fear? This is the physical reality as experienced by condemned murderers which no doubt also affects their closest entourage with repercussions on wider circles. But there are other imposing arguments that render the above stated objection look puerile. As regards the much vaunted statistics adduced as proof, one could ask: how much of perpetrated crime is made official and brought to public awareness? Crime could well be compared with bank deposits.

    How many of such are official? How many are hidden in undisclosed accounts, or are buried in nameless graves that are bank vaults, or sent abroad envelopped in secrecy? So also with crime. With most crime, especially sex crimes, what is brought to the limelight is only the tip of the iceberg. Ideas of respectability, status, reputation and the thought of being involved in interminable police and legal wranglings often stand in the way of giving publicity to crime. So as with bank accounts, many criminal deeds are stacked away in undisclosed deposits, inbdividual and collective, even hidden from prying journalistic eyes. Statistics are therefore false indicators meant for the gullible.

    The only lesson criminals should be made to understand is that ‘crime does not pay’. This is best shown by making the criminals pay for their deeds in a manner commensurate with the crimes committed. And now is the time for enforcement. Furthermore, rape, abuse of minors, murder, are acts of terror and their perpetrators must be considered as being terrorists. Has not this country declared an all out war on terror? Have we won over one terror only to succumb to another?

    The gallows is long overdue. The sandbags have been tested, hangmen are soon to be recruited on a long term basis – fifteen year contracts. The sandbags can now be safely set aside and the useless gutter garbage bins of our society serve instead as dead weight with the send-off words: good riddance to bad rubbish. Indeed religion and civilization urgently need legislative and executive props to make their mark on men and morals. In Sri Lanka State and religion have had closer ties that in most countries.

    It is high time to activate that link. At present both are dormant each living in its own dreamland with ample excuses for not foraying into the question of the death penalty, expecially its execution. Execution of the death sentence would be of immense service to both. The judiciary appears to have taken the lead with the historic Appeal Court judgment in the ‘Royal Park Condominium’ murder case. It is for the judiciary to judge. But it needs the Executive to ‘execute’.The time indeed is more than ripe for that.

    http://www.lankaweb.com/news/items/2...f-recuitement/
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  5. #15
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    Wanted: Sri Lanka hangman. Very light work. Only males need apply

    Sri Lanka on Tuesday began interviews for the post of hangman a year after two positions fell vacant, with at least 480 convicts on death row.

    But it was not quite clear how the two successful candidates would fill their days - the death penalty has not been used in Sri Lanka, a predominantly Buddhist country, since 1976.

    "About 176 applicants are there and interviews are going on today and tomorrow," Gamini Kulatunga, commissioner operations at the Prisons Department, told Reuters. "Only males will be eligible for the post."

    The two posts fell vacant after one hangman was promoted and the other retired.

    At least 480 people convicted of murder and drugs offences could potentially be executed, Kulatunga said.

    There has been an alarming rise in child abuse, rapes, murders, and drug trafficking since the 25-year war against Tamil Tiger separatists ended in May 2009, prompting some lawyers and politicians to push for the death penalty to be reintroduced.

    http://in.reuters.com/article/2012/0...8JS3FX20120828
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  6. #16
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    Sri Lanka to have 2 hangmen for death penalty

    Sri Lanka hopes to have 2 hangmen ready to carry out the death penalty if it is implemented, a top prison official said on Tuesday.

    Commissioner General of Prisons P.W.Kodippili told Xinhua that the interview process to recruit the hangmen was complete and the 2 hangmen will be selected within the next few days.

    "Of the several applications we received we conducted interviews and selected 10 out of the final lot. From that we hope to select 2 people to appoint them as hangmen," Kodippili said.

    Sri Lanka does not implement the death penalty but with over 1, 000 people on death row and an increase in crime reported over the past few years there has been strong speculation that the death penalty will be re-introduced.

    "That is a policy decision and not in the hands of my department," Kodippili said when asked if the finalizing of the hangman's post will see the immediate reintroduction of the death penalty.

    The government has said that the death penalty will be introduced against drug traffickers and rapists as well.

    The death penalty has not been implemented in Sri Lanka since 1976 but several people have been sentenced to death by local courts even this year.

    Following a murder of a judge in 2004, the country reinstated the death penalty but no president has ratified it and so the death sentence is automatically commuted to life imprisonment.

    Source: Global Times
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  7. #17
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    Sri Lanka pushes to hang child abusers, women's rapists

    Sri Lanka is planning to introduce death penalty to child abusers and rapists, an official said on Friday.

    The minister in charge of the Child Development and Women's affairs has proposed to the parliament to impose death sentence or life imprisonment to offenders who are convicted of child abuse and raping women, China's Xinhua news agency quoted a ministry official as saying.

    Minister Tissa Karalliyadde has told the parliament that severe punishment should be imposed on the 2 groups of criminals as the rapes of children and women are dangerously high.

    Early this year, a draft proposal recommending maximum punishment for rapists of women and children was sent to the Ministry of Justice.

    The state records indicated that in 2011, 1,450 female rape cases were reported while child rape accounted for 1,169.

    However, the National Child Protection Authority (NCPA), an institution specially established to curb child abuses indicated an alarming increase with at least 20,000 cases of child abuses reported in the 1st 6 months of 2012.

    Under Sri Lankan laws, those under 16 years are minors and sex with a minor is considered rape, with or without consent. Authorities are examining proposals to enforce the death penalty and make it a non-bailable offense, instead of present punishment maximum jail term of 10 years.

    Since the President does not endorse it, Sri Lanka has not implemented death penalty though recognizes it in principle. All convicted to death have been commuted to life in prison and the last execution was in 1973.

    Source: Bernama
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  8. #18
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    Sri Lanka Abstains From Voting Against Death Penalty

    Sri Lanka last week abstained from voting at the UN General Assembly in favour of abolishing the death penalty.
    The draft resolution on a moratorium on the use of the death penalty was adopted by a recorded vote of 111 in favour to 41 against, with 34 abstentions.
    According to Amnesty International Sri Lanka, the Maldives and Namibia went from a vote in favour to an abstention. Sri Lanka also abstained from voting for the draft resolution on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions.
    The document was adopted by a recorded vote of 117 in favour to none against, with 67 abstentions. The UN General Assembly, during its session last week adopted 56 resolutions and 9 decisions.
    Meanwhile Amnesty International welcomed an increase in global support for abolition of the death penalty.
    “Although the UNGA vote is not legally binding, it does express the will of the international community and is a strong signal from the world body. The death penalty is the ultimate form of cruel and inhuman punishment – we oppose its use in all circumstances,” Amnesty International’s UN representative in New York José Luis Díaz said in a statement.
    Amnesty International said that in the vote, the fourth such vote by the plenary session of the UNGA since 2007, there was an increase of two in support from the last vote in 2010.
    New voters in favour of the moratorium included the Central African Republic, Chad, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Sudan and Tunisia. As a further positive sign, Papua New Guinea and Indonesia moved from opposition to abstention. Amnesty expressed regret that Bahrain, Dominica and Oman changed their abstention to a vote against the resolution.

    http://www.thesundayleader.lk/2012/1...death-penalty/
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  9. #19
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    Sri Lanka recruits two executioners to implement capital punishment

    Sri Lanka which is considering to implement the death penalty, has recruited two executioners, Ministry of Prison Reforms and Rehabilitation said.

    The two executioners, elected from 145 short-listed candidates, are presently undergoing a 14-day special training.

    After the training, they will be deployed in Welikada and Bogambara prisons where the death row prisoners are being held.

    The persons selected for the job are residents of Negombo and Gampaha.

    In Sri Lanka where capital punishment is delivered, over 225 prisoners remain in the death row until the President orders their execution. However, the last execution took place in the island in 1976.

    http://www.colombopage.com/archive_1...59823792CH.php
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  10. #20
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    Death row inmates of Sri Lanka on roof top protest demanding execution

    Several death row inmates in Sri Lanka's Bogambara Prison in Kandy have commenced a protest on the roof top of the prison premises today demanding the authorities to carry out their sentences.

    The police said that three inmates at the Bogambara Prison carried out the roof top protest over their jail term demanding the authorities to carry out their verdicts.

    They have called on authorities to either implement the death penalty or to release them.

    Bogambara Prison officials have said that they were trying to resolve the matter with the three inmates who are protesting.

    Sri Lanka which is considering to implement the death penalty, recently recruited two executioners, and they are currently undergoing a 14-day special training.

    In Sri Lanka where capital punishment is delivered, over 225 prisoners remain in the death row until the President orders their execution. However, the last execution took place in the island in 1976.

    http://www.colombopage.com/archive_1...60078857CH.php
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