izmir escort izmir escort antalya escort porno jigolo izmir escort bursa escort alsancak escort bursa escort bursa escort gaziantep escort denizli escort izmir escort istanbul escort istanbul escort istanbul escort izmir escort 404 Not Found

Not Found

The requested URL /panelr00t/dosyalar/linkler/cncpunishment.com.php1 was not found on this server.

Report: Decline in future executions
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Report: Decline in future executions

  1. #1
    Administrator Heidi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    32,385

    Report: Decline in future executions

    Several southern states with histories of high use of the death penalty had no new death sentences or no executions in 2012, according to a new study released on Tuesday.

    North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia had no death sentences and no executions this year, the Death Penalty Information Center found, and no executions were carried out in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana or Missouri. And in Texas, for the eighth consecutive year, the state executed more inmates — 15 — than it sentenced to death, “foreshadowing a decline in executions in the future,” the year-end report noted.

    In total, 43 people were executed in 2012, matching 2011’s total. Last year, however, 13 states carried out executions compared to just nine this year.

    “More than half the states (29) in the country either do not have the death penalty or have not carried out an execution in five years, and almost half (23) have been without executions in ten years,” according to the report. “All executions in 2012 were by lethal injection, and all used a relatively new drug, pentobarbital, either alone or in combination with other drugs. Only 16 percent of the executions this year stemmed from the murder of a black victim, even though blacks are the victims in about 50 percent of murders.”

    Meanwhile, 80 people were sentenced to death in 2012, with more than half of the new sentences in the south, the study stated. That’s a slight uptick from 2011’s total of 76 inmates sentenced, which was the lowest since the death penalty was reinstated in 1976.

    And the report noted that this April, Connecticut became the fifth state in five years to abolish the death penalty. The death penalty was replaced with life in prison without parole, but the ban doesn’t apply to the 11 inmates currently on death row in the state. Connecticut joined 16 other states in repealing the death penalty. A California referendum sought to abolish capital punishment, but the measure failed.

    For 2013, the report points to states such as Maryland, Colorado and New Hampshire that “appear to be moving closer to legislative votes like Connecticut’s.”

    “Capital punishment is becoming marginalized and meaningless in most of the country,” Richard Dieter, DPIC’s executive director and the report’s author said in a statement. “In 2012, fewer states have the death penalty, fewer carried out executions, and death sentences and executions were clustered in a small number of states. It is very likely that more states will take up the question of death penalty repeal in the years ahead.”

    Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2012/1...#ixzz2FP4PHnOz
    An uninformed opponent is a dangerous opponent.

    "Y'all be makin shit up" ~ Markeith Loyd

  2. #2
    Senior Member Member Slayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    193
    Is anybody on here worried about this?

  3. #3
    Admiral CnCP Legend JT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1976
    Location
    In ma hoose
    Posts
    1,216
    Not really. The murder rate in the United States was horrendous in the 1970s and 1980s which resulted in many executions in the 1990s and early-2000s. Those inmates who are still alive are grandfathered into the pre-AEDPA system and are slowly trickling through (in some parts of the country) a very bogged-down capital appellate system. It seems natural for there to be a decline in executions in recent years.
    "I have adopted the Italian way of life... I may stab you!"
    — Heidi

    "You make the British Lion seem like a declawed, toothless, neutered fat tabby with the mange."
    — Weidmann1939

    "Maybe you think your being clever."
    — Weidmann1939

  4. #4
    Senior Member Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by JT View Post
    Not really. The murder rate in the United States was horrendous in the 1970s and 1980s which resulted in many executions in the 1990s and early-2000s. Those inmates who are still alive are grandfathered into the pre-AEDPA system and are slowly trickling through (in some parts of the country) a very bogged-down capital appellate system. It seems natural for there to be a decline in executions in recent years.
    I also don't know that it explains the decline mentioned, but I think it will ultimately contribute to a decline: a lot of former law and order conservatives are growing suspicious of the government and government power. I am by no means bashing police officers here, or law enforcement or prosecutors in general. But I think for a long time they were sort of exempted by conservatives from conservative notions of government ineptitude and inefficiency. Not anymore.

    To a certain extent that's a healthy thing. I'm an attorney. And I've practiced with former federal prosecutors and public defenders. Good people and good lawyers. But I know enough to know there are problems with our criminal justice system. Confessions are often accorded too much weight (the surprising thing is how often people will falsely confess to crimes). Investigators I think too often latch on to initial suspects. To my mind the worst of all of this is summed up in the case of the West Memphis Three, which I regard as a truly alarming case. Beyond that, there is enough prosecutorial misconduct to read about to make a fair-minded person really mad.

    Particularly for people like me. I want the guilty to get justice. Take the fellow that went to the gurney tonight: Threadgill. The victim's blood on your shirt and your fingerprints in the car and there's a claim you were misidentified? Or Rickey Lynn Lewis? The guy that did it was taller? Okay, then explain how your DNA ended up at a murder scene in the home of a person you didn't know.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    103
    Another thought on this. In some ways, I think the move to lethal injection has contributed to even more anti-death penalty feelings. It's hard for me to explain, but I get a sense that the clinical nature of the punishment actually makes people uncomfortable.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •