izmir escort izmir escort antalya escort porno jigolo izmir escort bursa escort alsancak escort bursa escort bursa escort gaziantep escort denizli escort izmir escort istanbul escort istanbul escort istanbul escort izmir escort 404 Not Found

Not Found

The requested URL /panelr00t/dosyalar/linkler/cncpunishment.com.php1 was not found on this server.

Stephen Marc Stone Sentenced to LWOP in 2013 AL Slaying of Krista and Zachary Stone - Page 3
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 26 of 26

Thread: Stephen Marc Stone Sentenced to LWOP in 2013 AL Slaying of Krista and Zachary Stone

  1. #21
    Senior Member CnCP Legend CharlesMartel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    FRANCE
    Posts
    3,062
    Facing death penalty trial Jan. 28, Stephen Marc Stone asks court to throw out alleged confession

    BY BRIAN LAWSON
    whnt.com

    HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — Lawyers for Stephen Marc Stone, who is set to go on trial for capital murder Jan. 28, are asking that an alleged confession he made to police be thrown out because he didn’t understand his Miranda rights, including the right to remain silent.

    Stone is charged with killing his wife and 7-year-old son at their South Huntsville home in February 2013 and could face the death penalty if convicted.

    His lawyers Brian Clark and Larry Marsili argued in a Wednesday court filing, “… the Defendant’s statement was the direct result of improper influences made to the Defendant by the investigator; as well as the Defendant(s) inability to understand his rights under Miranda v. Arizona … and as such, the same was obtained in violation of the Defendant’s Due Process Rights.”

    According to the account provided by investigators at Stone’s preliminary hearing in 2013, he left his two daughters unharmed after strangling his wife Krista and son Zachary. Stone then drove his daughters from Huntsville to his parents’ home in Leeds. After dropping them off, according to hearing testimony, Stone went to the Leeds Police Department and advised officers to check his residence.

    He later confessed to the killings, police said.

    In Wednesday’s motion to suppress, Stone’s lawyers argue he was “not provided his rights” for six hours, until he was questioned by Huntsville Police Department investigator Michael Leftwich.

    The defense says Stone asked Leftwich to repeat his Miranda rights, after Leftwich first verbally presented them.

    The defense claims Stone questioned the use of the word, “counsel” and assumed “that meant was entitled to pastoral instead of legal counsel.”

    The defense filing argues:

    “The Defendant did not understand the terms contained in his Miranda rights that were verbally stated to him twice. The officers never clarified that he was not entitled to pastoral counsel. At the end of the interrogation, Investigator Leftwich handed the defendant a copy of the warrant for the search of his home and the defendant thought he was required to sign. The defendant stated ‘usually…when people hand me a piece of paper I’m supposed to sign it.’”

    Leftwich then asked Stone if he wanted to make a statement. The defense contends Stone didn’t understand his rights, that he thought counsel meant a pastor not a lawyer and that he was under the impression that he was supposed to sign documents put in front of him.

    “Based upon the foregoing improper influences of the investigator and the defendant’s inability to understand his rights, the Defendant waived his rights, and allegedly made incriminating statements to law enforcement officers. The statements allegedly made by the Defendant herein were involuntarily made.”

    Stone is set to be in court Thursday for an arraignment and for the two sides to discuss scheduling of the upcoming trial and there are details to work out before his trial begins.

    The state is seeking the death penalty.

    “We are looking at the specific facts of the case and one of the factors is was it especially heinous, atrocious and cruel? And that’s, for me that’s the number one factor I’m looking at, is the brutality of what happened,” said Tim Gann, chief trial attorney for the Madison County District Attorney’s Office.

    A death penalty case means a larger jury pool. The defense and prosecution have worked together on a juror questionnaire, around 100 questions, with a focus on attitudes about the death penalty.

    The two sides and the court all have to agree on the questionnaire.

    The defense is planning to argue Stone was insane at the time of the killings.

    Prosecutors say they expect a jury could be seated by late Wednesday, Jan. 30, with the actual trial starting the next day.

    If Stone is found guilty the case moves into the penalty phase, essentially a mini-trial, where the jury will be asked to decide if he should get a death sentence.

    Madison County Circuit Judge Donna Pate is presiding over the trial.

    https://whnt.com/2019/01/16/facing-d...ed-confession/
    Dp for me. Thanks. God bless America.

  2. #22
    Senior Member CnCP Legend CharlesMartel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    FRANCE
    Posts
    3,062
    Man’s death penalty trial to begin in 2013 Huntsville slayings of wife, son

    By Ashley Remkus
    AL.com

    The death penalty trial of Stephen Marc Stone, a man accused of killing his wife and young son nearly six years ago, is scheduled to begin Monday in Madison County.

    Stone is charged with two counts of capital murder in the February 2013 deaths of 32-year-old Krista Stone and 7-year-old Zachary Stone at their south Huntsville home.

    He’s pursuing an insanity defense.

    Jury selection is set to begin around 9 a.m. Monday. Lawyers say it could take a few days before the jury is seated and testimony begins.

    Questions about Stone’s mental capacity have delayed the trial in the past. Madison County Circuit Judge Donna Pate in 2017 ruled Stone was not competent to stand trial and ordered he be treated at the Alabama Department of Mental Health. A new trial date was set after Stone was released from mental health treatment.

    Before the trial begins Monday, Pate still has to rule on a defense motion to bar Stone’s police interview from being used as evidence. In the interview, police have said, Stone confessed to both killings. In their motion, defense attorneys Brian Clark and Larry Marsili argue that Stone didn’t understand his Miranda Rights, meaning his statements were made involuntarily.

    “The defendant’s purported confession and/or statements are inadmissible because they were involuntarily made,” the defense attorneys said in court records. They are also asking the judge to toss any evidence that police found as a result of or after the “illegal interrogation.”

    “All searches and seizures that followed … the illegal interrogation are fruit of the poisonous tree,” Clark and Marsili wrote.

    Madison County District Attorney Rob Broussard and Chief Trial Attorney Tim Gann are prosecuting the case. If Stone is convicted, prosecutors will ask the jury to recommend the death penalty. The defense has filed several motions to bar the death penalty. The judge said she will rule on those motions if Stone is convicted.

    The potential witness list includes several Huntsville police officers, medical experts and others.

    Authorities say after the killings, Stone took his two young daughters to his parents’ home in Leeds. Stone turned himself in for the killings at the police station in Leeds, previous court testimony revealed. Leeds police contacted Huntsville authorities, who went to the Stone home at 11313 Chicamauga Trail S.E. and found both bodies on Feb. 24, 2013. Court records say Krista and Zachary Stone were both choked, and the boy was also drowned.

    Stone is charged with one count of capital murder that accuses him of killing two or more people and a second count of capital murder alleges he killed a person younger than 14.

    Stone doesn’t have a criminal history, according to police. He and Krista worked at Crestwood Hospital.

    https://www.al.com/news/2019/01/mans...-wife-son.html
    Dp for me. Thanks. God bless America.

  3. #23
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    12,811
    Jury hears grisly murder details as death penalty trial begins in Huntsville

    By Ashley Remkus
    AL.com

    Stephen Marc Stone was frustrated and dissatisfied in a struggling marriage when he killed his wife and 7-year-old son nearly six years ago, a prosecutor said today.

    Stone had reached the end of his rope, Madison County Chief Trial Attorney Tim Gann told a jury on Thursday.

    But, said Gann, “Marc Stone had absolutely no history of mental illness.”

    Stone, 39, is pursuing an insanity defense at his death penalty trial this week. He’s charged with two counts of capital murder in the February 2013 slayings of his 32-year-old wife, Krista, and 7-year-old son, Zachary.

    Opening arguments and testimony got underway Thursday after the jury of 16, including four alternates, was selected. Along with Gann, Madison County District Attorney Rob Broussard is prosecuting the case. Huntsville defense attorneys Larry Marsili and Brian Clark represent Stone.

    Marsili told the jury that Stone was suffering with paranoid schizophrenia — a diagnosis confirmed by three doctors. Marsili said Stone’s mental illness left him unable to understand right and wrong at the time of the killings. The defense doesn’t dispute that Stone killed his wife and son.

    “This case is about Marc Stone and what was going on in his mind at the time this happened,” Marsili told the jury. “That’s the part of the case that’s in dispute. That’s the part of the case we’re asking you to focus on.”

    Stone confessed to police that he killed his wife and son. Gann said Stone told police “something broke inside of me,” and that after the killings he “felt free.”

    Gann told the jury the following about the night Stone killed his wife and son:

    Stone strangled his wife to death during an argument. After killing his wife on the couch in their Chicamauga Trail home in southeast Huntsville, Stone went into Zachary’s room. Zachary, a first-grader at Mt. Gap Elementary, was sleeping in his dinosaur pajamas. Stone covered the boy’s face and grabbed his neck, Zachary started convulsing, so Stone when into the bathroom, plugged the tub and turned on the water.

    Stone held his son’s head under the water and killed him, Gann said.

    Zachary fought, but “a first-grader is no match for a 6-foot-1, 200-pound grown man," Gann said.

    Before the killings, the Stone family was expecting Marc Stone’s parents to come for a visit from their home in Leeds. But Marc Stone left home that day, leaving only a note that he was going for a drive, Gann said. Marc Stone returned home around midnight — after his parents were gone.

    That’s when, prosecutors say, Krista Stone wanted answers about where her husband had been that day, and the couple argued.

    Gann said Marc Stone was depressed and unsatisfied with his life.

    He was “a man that was kind of at the end of his rope — not really a man anymore,” Gann said. “Krista was the leader. She outshined Marc in every way.”

    The morning after the killings, Marc Stone took the couple’s two other children—ages 2 and 4 at the time—and drove to Leeds, where his parents lived. He eventually went to the Leeds Police Department to report he’d killed his wife and son in Huntsville.

    Huntsville police went to the Stone home on Feb. 24, 2013 and found the bodies of Krista and Zachary lying covered, next to each other in bed.

    Marsili said the slayings are a tragedy, but he urged the jury to separate emotion from the facts of the case. He said jurors should put their heads over their hearts.

    "Set aside the emotions that go with a case like this and use your thought process," to apply the law to the facts of the case, he said.

    Marsili said he understands that jurors may be skeptical of an insanity defense, but “the evidence is going to be clear that Marc is not faking this illness.”

    The trial continues Friday morning. If Stone is convicted, prosecutors will seek the death penalty.

    https://www.al.com/news/2019/02/jury...untsville.html
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    “There are some people who just do not deserve to live,”
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    “Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

  4. #24
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    12,811
    Huntsville man convicted of capital murder in 2013 slayings of wife, young son

    By Ashley Remkus
    AL.com

    Stephen Marc Stone was convicted of capital murder today in the 2013 Huntsville slayings of his wife and young son.

    A Madison County jury found Stone, 39, guilty in the choking death of 32-year-old Krista Stone and the choking and drowning death of 7-year-old Zachary Stone.

    Prosecutors will seek the death penalty when the sentencing phase of the trial begins Wednesday morning.

    The jury will issue an advisory verdict on whether Stone should face execution or life in prison without the possibility of parole. The final sentencing decision is up to Madison County Circuit Judge Donna Pate.

    The jury deliberated for around two hours Tuesday afternoon.

    “This is a difficult case and we’re very happy with the work the jury put in," Gann said. "It’s been almost six years since it happened. There were times we didn’t even know if we would get here.”

    Defense attorney Larry Marsili said it’s a “difficult day" when a client gets a guilty verdict.

    “But you know going in it’s a possibility," Marsili said. “It doesn’t take the sting out of it or make it any easier to deal with.”

    Jurors on Tuesday morning heard about two and a half hours of closing arguments from prosecutors and the defense.

    Stone pursued an insanity defense. The jury had three choices for the verdict: guilty, not guilty or not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect.

    “Even though this is not a run-of-the-mill murder case, it’s not legal insanity,” said Madison County District Attorney Rob Broussard in closing arguments.

    The trial began with jury selection Jan. 28. Testimony began Thursday after the jury was selected.

    The jury heard testimony from several witnesses, including defense experts who determined Stone was insane at the time he killed his wife and young son. The defense argued that because he was suffering from paranoid schizophrenia, Stone isn’t legally accountable for the killings.

    Defense attorney Brian Clark in closing arguments asked the jury to put their heads over their hearts as they considered the evidence. Clark said there wasn’t motive for Stone to kill his wife and son.

    But Madison County Chief Trial Attorney Tim Gann told the jury that Stone hated his life and was angry with his wife when he committed the killings. Gann said the Stone marriage was in trouble, and there was evidence Marc Stone was addicted to pornography. He said Stone had no history of mental illness.

    “That’s not a compulsion,” Gann said. “That’s called motive.”

    Stone killed his wife and son in February 2013 — a fact that the defense didn’t dispute. Stone confessed to police that he committed the killings. Gann said Stone told police “something broke inside of me,” and that after the killings he “felt free.”

    Before the February 2013 killings, the Stone family was expecting Marc Stone’s parents to come for a visit from their home in Leeds. But Marc Stone left home that day, leaving only a note that he was going for a drive. Marc Stone returned home around midnight — after his parents were gone.

    That’s when, prosecutors say, Krista Stone wanted answers about where her husband had been that day, and the couple argued.

    Stone strangled his wife to death on the couch in their Chicamauga Trail home in southeast Huntsville. Stone then went into the bedroom of his sleeping 7-year-old son Zachary, a first-grader at Mt. Gap Elementary. Stone covered the boy’s face and grabbed his neck. Zachary started convulsing, so Stone when into the bathroom, plugged the tub and turned on the water, prosecutors said. Stone held his son’s head under the water and killed him, Gann said.

    The morning after the killings, Marc Stone took the couple’s two other children — ages 2 and 4 at the time — and drove to Leeds, where his parents lived. He eventually went to the Leeds Police Department to report he’d killed his wife and son in Huntsville.

    Huntsville police went to the Stone home on Feb. 24, 2013 and found the bodies of Krista and Zachary lying covered, next to each other in bed.

    Marc Stone was convicted of two counts of capital murder — one for killing a child younger than 14 and a second count for killing two or more people.

    https://www.al.com/news/2019/02/hunt...young-son.html
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    “There are some people who just do not deserve to live,”
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    “Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

  5. #25
    Administrator Helen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    12,811
    Jury recommends life without parole for Huntsville man in 2013 slayings of wife, son

    By Ashley Remkus
    AL.com

    A jury recommended today that Stephen Marc Stone be sentenced to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole for the 2013 Huntsville killings of his wife and young son.

    The jury voted 9-3 to impose the prison sentence. The jury’s verdict is advisory and the final sentencing decision is left to Madison County Circuit Judge Donna Pate. Pate will sentence 39-year-old Stone later this year.

    Defense attorney Brian Clark said he’s thankful the jurors voted to spare Stone’s life.

    “There’s no winners in this case,” Clark said.

    The jury recommended the prison sentence on Wednesday after hours of deliberations.

    On Tuesday, the jury convicted Stone of two counts of capital murder for the choking death of 32-year-old Krista Stone and the choking and drowning death of 7-year-old Zachary Stone.

    “We were hoping for a different result,” Madison County District Attorney Rob Broussard said of the sentencing recommendation.

    Broussard thanked the jury for its work. Broussard said he still believes Stone deserves the death penalty and is looking toward the final sentencing hearing.

    The only sentencing options for capital murder are execution or life in prison without the possibility of parole.

    The sentencing phase of Stone’s trial began Wednesday morning. Prosecutors called one witness — Krista Stone’s mother — to testify about how the killings have affected her.

    “It was absolutely devastating,” Krista’s mother Kathy Kowalski testified. “We didn’t believe it at first that it happened the way (the authorities) said it did.”

    During an argument, Stone strangled his wife to death on the couch in their Chicamauga Trail home in southeast Huntsville, prosecutors said. Stone then went into the bedroom of his sleeping 7-year-old son Zachary, a first-grader at Mt. Gap Elementary. Stone covered the boy’s face and grabbed his neck. Zachary started convulsing, so Stone when into the bathroom, plugged the tub and turned on the water. Stone held his son’s head under the water and killed him, prosecutors said.

    The defense didn’t dispute that Stone killed his wife and son. Stone pursued an insanity defense, which the jury rejected.

    Kowalski testified Krista was the oldest of her six children Zachary was Kowalski’s first grandchild.

    “We loved him,” Kowalski testified about Zachary. She told the jury Zachary’s cousins and his surviving sisters won’t remember him because they were so young when he was killed. Their family, Kowalski testified, didn’t get to see Zachary, who would have been a teenager by now if he survived, grow up.

    In his closing arguments, Madison County Chief Trial Attorney Tim Gann said the jury — in voting for execution or life in prison without parole— faced a decision that isn’t easy. “But it’s not complicated,” Gann said. “It’s deciding good and evil.”

    Gann said Stone hadn’t been remorseful for killing his wife and young son. The prosecutor told the jury that Stone has tried to make excuses for what he did, including by pursing an insanity defense.

    “Today is the day there’s an accounting for that evil behavior,” Gann told the jury when asking that they recommend the death penalty.

    Prosecutors sought to prove to the jury two aggravating factors, which are circumstances that would lead to the death penalty. The state argued these aggravating circumstances:

    • Stone killed two or more people
    • The killings were especially heinous, atrocious and cruel as compared to other capital murder cases

    Despite unanimously deciding the state proved both aggravating circumstances beyond a reasonable doubt, the jury didn’t recommend the death penalty.

    The defense, by calling two witnesses, presented mitigating factors, which are circumstances that would lead to a life without parole sentence. The defense argued that Stone’s paranoid schizophrenia diagnosis, his lack of criminal history and his prior contributions to society should mitigate the death sentence.

    Carol Walker, a Huntsville psychologist, testified about performing a psychosocial evaluation of Stone. Walker told the jury she reviewed jail records, medical records, academic records and more, plus spent about 19-20 hours with Stone. She also spent 42 hours interviewing 16 relatives and friends to reach the conclusion that Stone showed “essentially none” of the risk factors for further criminal behavior. Walker testified that Stone is unlikely to be violent in prison.

    Walker described Stone as a man who grew up in a good family environment, has an average intellect and provided for his family. Walker told the jury that Stone is remorseful and expressed guilt during their conversations.

    A second defense witness — Michael Farmer, a longtime friend of Stone and his family — told the jury Stone had been a “very loving dad” who was loved by his children. The jury saw happy photos of Marc Stone with his children.

    Stone attorney Larry Marsili said the defense wasn’t trying to make excuses for what Stone did.

    “Life in prison without the possibility of parole isn’t a free pass,” Marsili told the jury. “Whatever decision you make doesn’t bring back Krista and Zachary, unfortunately.”

    Marsili told the jury that if they could find just one redeeming quality — just one way that Stone, a former youth minister, could help someone in the future — they should recommend life in prison without parole.

    But Broussard said the jury should hold Stone accountable for the killings by recommending the death penalty.

    “We’re all accountable in life,” Broussard said. “We’re responsible for what we do in this life.”

    https://www.al.com/news/2019/02/jury-recommends-life-without-parole-for-huntsville-man-in-2013-slayings-of-wife-son.html
    "I realize this may sound harsh, but as a father and former lawman, I really don't care if it's by lethal injection, by the electric chair, firing squad, hanging, the guillotine or being fed to the lions."
    - Oklahoma Rep. Mike Christian

    “There are some people who just do not deserve to live,”
    - Rev. Richard Hawke

    “Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence"
    - Edgar Allan Poe

  6. #26
    Senior Member Frequent Poster Steven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Huntsville, Texas
    Posts
    308
    HUNTSVILLE MAN WHO MURDERED WIFE, SON GETS LIFE WITHOUT PAROLE

    Stephen Marc Stone killed his wife and son, 32-year-old Krista Stone and 7-year-old Zachary Stone, inside their south Huntsville home on Feb. 24, 2013.

    By Sydney Martin and Josh Rayburn
    WAAY-TV

    Judge Donna Pate has sentenced convicted killer Stephen Marc Stone to life in prison without parole for murdering his wife and son.

    Stone killed his wife and son, 32-year-old Krista Stone and 7-year-old Zachary Stone, inside their south Huntsville home on Feb. 24, 2013.

    Friday's hearing lasted less than an hour. During it, Stone spoke and said he was sorry and said he was at peace with receiving the death penalty.

    "He understands the ramifications of what he did. He understands that there is obviously going to be punishment that goes with that," said his attorney, Larry Marsili.

    Stone’s attorney said they appreciate his ability to address the court, but believe he suffers from mental disturbance and it's impacting his ability to determine the criminality of his actions.

    Marsili told the judge that Stone had no mental illness leading up to the murders, and Stone was a hardworking family man who supported his family and attended church. However, he said no one knew about his mental illness before the 2013 murders.

    "It's undisputed in our view that Marc is schizophrenic, and he is suffering from a clear mental disease," Marsili said.

    A jury convicted Stone in February 2019, recommending two counts of life in prison without parole. For both counts, three jurors recommended the death penalty and nine recommended life in prison without parole. Pate had the final sentencing decision.

    The prosecution said they're hoping the sentencing gives everyone involved closure.

    "It does give me some comfort that he realizes what he did and feels some remorse and hopefully, it's honest and genuine," said Prosecutor Tim Gann.

    Authorities say Stone strangled his victims. The trial was pushed back several times for mental evaluations of Stone, but he ultimately was found competent to stand trial but pursued an insanity defense.

    https://www.waaytv.com/content/news/...508163491.html

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •