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Dennis Thurnado Glover - Florida
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    Dennis Thurnado Glover - Florida




    Man found guilty in 2012 stabbing death


    A man who allegedly had the blood of a 2012 murder victim on his shoes was convicted Thursday.

    Fifty-year-old Dennis Thurnado Glover was found guilty of First Degree Murder in the death of Sandra Allen, 51, according to a release from the State Attorney's Office.

    Glover allegedly told his girlfriend he heard screams coming from Allen's house two doors down and said he was going to check on her.

    Later, Allen was found to be fatally strangled and stabbed. Investigators then found blood on Glover's shoes to be a DNA match for Allen's.

    On Dec. 19, a jury will decide if Glover should face the death penalty. Judge Mallory Cooper will make the final decision, according to the release.

    http://www.firstcoastnews.com/topsto...stabbing-death
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    Dennis Glover sentenced to death row for the murder of Sandra Allen

    On Friday afternoon, a jury voted to send Dennis Glover, 50, to death row for the murder of 51-year-old Sandra Allen.

    Glover was convicted last week on one count of first degree murder for stabbing and strangling Allen to death in May 2012, according to a release from the State Attorney's Office.

    Glover told his girlfriend that he heard screams coming from the victim's home, which according to police, was two doors down, and thought he should go check on the victim.

    When police officials arrived, officers discovered Allen's body. Police later matched blood found on the defendant's shoes to the victim.

    Glover's DNA was also on the victim in multiple locations.

    Although the jury has recommended death, the final sentencing decision will be made by Judge Mallory Cooper.

    The next court date in the penalty phase is set for February 10, 2014.

    http://www.firstcoastnews.com/news/a...row-for-murder
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    U.S. Supreme Court ruling could complicate case of Jacksonville man facing death row

    A Jacksonville judge will decide Wednesday whether a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling will complicate the sentencing of a man facing the death penalty for killing his neighbor.

    Dennis Thurnado Glover, 50, was convicted last year of the murder of 51-year-old Sandra Jean Allen. The jury recommended he be sentenced to death by a 10-2 vote.

    Circuit Judge Mallory Cooper must sentence Glover to either life in prison without parole or death. The sentence is scheduled for Friday.

    But Cooper has scheduled a hearing Wednesday to give Glover's lawyers a chance to argue whether the recent Supreme Court ruling Hall vs. Florida applies to Glover. The Supreme Court ruled that Florida misunderstood a previous opinion designed to protect the intellectually disabled from execution when the state set a strict IQ standard for death-row inmates.

    Florida law said that people facing death row can only argue that they are intellectually disabled if they have an IQ score of 70 or below, not taking into account a margin of error. But the Supreme Court said the state could not automatically declare anyone with an IQ score higher than 70 was not intellectually disabled, and judges have to look at other factors as well.

    Lawyers for Glover have said his IQ is about 72.

    Cooper told prosecutors and defense attorneys Monday that she didn't think the Supreme Court ruling would affect this case but wanted to allow arguments before Friday's sentencing date.

    Allen had been beaten, strangled and stabbed in the neck before she died.

    Glover said he found Allen dead in her home and went to get help from some of his neighbors. He told police he saw 2 black men fleeing and then found her door cracked open with Allen's body inside.

    He allowed his shoes to be photographed and tested for DNA.

    Glover was arrested a month after the May 2012 murder when police found Allen's blood on his shoes and his DNA on her face, neck and left hand.

    When the jury was considering whether to recommend life in prison or death, Assistant State Attorney John Guy told them that Glover deserved death because of the brutality of the crime and because he'd been in prison twice before.

    "He strangled her to the point where the bones in her neck snapped," Guy said. "This was in her house, where she eats, sleeps and watches television."

    Allen knew what Glover was doing to her and suffered before she died, Guy said.

    Glover previously was sentenced to 10 years for armed robbery and 5 years in an aggravated assault after he attacked a woman with a wrench.

    Attorneys for Glover argued that he was bipolar, had below-average intelligence and had problems with substance abuse.

    "There is no need to kill him," Assistant Public Defender Al Perkins said. "He will be punished every day for the rest of his life in prison."

    (Source: Jacksonville.com)
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    Man facing death penalty to be sentenced

    A sentencing hearing was held Wednesday for a man convicted of murdering his neighbor in 2012.

    Dennis Glover, 50, is facing the death penalty for killing 51-year-old Sandra Allen.

    In December, the jury voted 10-2 for the death penalty, but Glover's lawyers contend he should not be executed because of his mental state, in light of the Florida Supreme Court's ruling protecting intellectually disabled defendants from being executed.

    Prosecutors say the murder was especially violent and cruel. Allen was strangled and stabbed to death.

    The judge is expected to decide on Glover's sentence Friday.

    http://www.news4jax.com/news/man-fac...enced/26548196
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    Really?

    Jacksonville man will get chance to prove he's too intellectually disabled to go to Death Row

    Attorneys for a man facing a potential death sentence will be allowed to present more evidence their client is mentally disabled before a Jacksonville judge decides whether to sentence him to death or life in prison without the possibility of parole.

    Circuit Judge Mallory Cooper agreed Friday to give Dennis Thurnado Glover, 50, another evidentiary hearing that would allow his defense team to argue that he suffers from intellectual disabilities that would prevent his execution....

    Glover, 50, was convicted last year of the murder of 51-year-old Sandra Jean Allen. The jury recommended he be sentenced to death by a 10-2 vote.

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2002 that executing someone who is intellectually disabled violates the eighth amendment prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment.

    Florida responded to that ruling by passing a law that said people facing capital punishment can only argue that they are intellectually disabled if they have an IQ score of 70 or below, not taking into account a margin of error.

    But last month the U.S. Supreme Court threw out that law, and said the state could not automatically declare that anyone with an IQ score higher than 70 was not intellectually disabled, and judges have to look at other factors as well.

    Glover is believed to have an IQ in the low 70s, although one doctor gave him an IQ score of 67.

    Cooper was originally scheduled to rule Friday on whether Glover got death or life in prison, under Florida law those are the only two sentencing options available to her.

    But Assistant Public Defender Michael Bateh argued the recent Supreme Court ruling changed the rules, and he was now obligated to go back and present more evidence that his client was mentally deficient.

    Bateh asked for an entirely new penalty phase that would have had another jury seated to make a recommendation on whether his client should go to Death Row.

    Cooper denied that request, but agreed to a second request for a hearing that will allow defense attorneys to present more evidence on Glover’s intellectual capabilities.

    Assistant State Attorney John Guy opposed the motion for a new penalty phase and a new hearing, arguing that the defense hadn’t demonstrated either was necessary.

    Cooper said she thought a new hearing was justified.

    The hearing will occur the week of July 28. A specific date for the hearing will be set on the Monday of that week.

    Glover said he found Allen, who lived two doors down from him, dead in her home and went to get help from some of his neighbors. He told police he saw two men fleeing and then found her door cracked open with Allen’s body inside.

    Allen had been beaten, strangled and stabbed in the neck before she died.

    Glover allowed his shoes to be photographed and tested for DNA. He was arrested a month after the May 2012 murder when police found Allen’s blood on his shoes and his DNA on her face, neck and left hand.

    http://jacksonville.com/news/crime/2...#ixzz35DGDByHo
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    Life or death: Hearing focuses on whether killer is mentally disabled

    Dennis Thurnado Glover was convicted of the first-degree murder of Sandra Jean Allen in December 2013 and a Jacksonville jury recommended he be sentenced to death by a 10-2 vote that same month.

    But 17 months later Glover, 51, still has not been sentenced by Circuit Judge Mallory Cooper. The only options available to Cooper are life without parole or death.

    The case has bogged down over the issue of whether Glover is intellectually disabled, which was previously called retarded. The U.S. Supreme court ruled it was unconstitutional to put intellectually disabled people on Death Row and also ruled that Florida’s method of determining intellectual disability via an IQ test was unconstitutional.

    Under the law Glover can still be put in prison for the rest of his life if he is found to be intellectually disabled. He just can’t be executed.

    Friday prosecutors called clinical psychologist Greg Prichard, who said Glover is not intellectually disabled.

    Glover refused to meet or be examined by Prichard, but the psychologist said he could still say with authority that Glover wasn’t disabled because of his school records and letters he wrote to his daughter and Cooper.

    Glover had several IQ tests when he was a child and he graded out around 80. Someone who scores below 70 is regarded as intellectually disabled, Prichard said.

    School officials also didn’t seem to think he was disabled, and Glover’s letters show an understanding of complex words and sentence structure that an intellectually disabled person does not possess, he said.

    Prichard’s view was challenged by Assistant Public Defender Michael Bateh, who pointed out that it wasn’t unusual for an inmate to write letters for another inmate, a point Prichard conceded.

    Bateh also pointed out that there were at least two IQ tests where Glover scored under 70, but Prichard said one of those wasn’t a comprehensive test, and it was unclear what method the other one used.

    Bateh argued that it appeared that the school system in Georgia just passed Glover each year even if he hadn’t really earned a passing grade. Glover dropped out of school in the 10th grade.

    After Prichard testified, Cooper gave Glover’s lawyers until later this month to call their own expert.

    Glover, wearing shackles and a green prison uniform, spent most of Friday’s hearing either staring straight ahead or shaking his head back and forth. He appeared to have little interaction with his attorneys and was nonresponsive several times when they tried to speak to him.

    Earlier this year Glover tried to dismiss his lawyers and represent himself, but Cooper ruled he wasn’t competent to do it.

    Glover said he found the 51-year-old Allen, who lived two doors down from him, dead in her home and went to get help from some of his neighbors. He told police he saw two men fleeing and then found her door cracked open with Allen’s body inside.

    She had been beaten, strangled and stabbed in the neck.

    Glover allowed his shoes to be photographed and tested for DNA. He was arrested a month after the May 2012 murder when police found Allen’s blood on his shoes and his DNA on her face, neck and left hand.

    Another man facing a potential death sentence, James Xavier Rhodes, also was scheduled for a hearing Friday to determine his intellectual ability. But that hearing was delayed because defense lawyers are seeking to call more people to court who knew Rhodes.

    He is accused of killing 20-year-old phone store manager Shelby Farah and has not yet gone on trial. Farah was shot in the head after she gave the robber several hundred dollars. The killing was captured on surveillance video.

    Mental-health experts have already testified in Rhodes’ case with Prichard saying Rhodes isn’t intellectually disabled and another psychiatrist working for the defense saying he is.

    http://jacksonville.com/news/crime/2...tally-disabled
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    Hearing on intelligence of potential death penalty killer concludes

    Dennis Thurnado Glover will find out if heís going to Death Row or getting life in prison without the possibility of parole in August, 20 months after he was convicted of the murder of Sandra Jean Allen.

    Glover, 51, has been in limbo because of uncertainty over whether he has the mental capacity to be put on Death Row. A multiple-day hearing on his intelligence concluded Friday and Glover is now scheduled to be sentenced Friday, Aug. 14.

    Circuit Judge Mallory Cooper will consider the issue of Gloverís intelligence and the facts of the murder and then issue her sentence. Under Florida law, the only options available to Cooper are life without parole or death.

    The hearing concluded with psychiatrist Larry Neidigh testifying that Glover was likely intellectually disabled, which was previously called retarded.

    ďThe information I reviewed strongly suggests that heís intellectually disabled,Ē Neidigh said. ďBut I canít be definitive one way or the other.Ē

    In 2014 the U.S. Supreme Court ruled it was unconstitutional to put intellectually disabled people on Death Row and also ruled that Floridaís method of determining intellectual disability via an IQ test was unconstitutional.

    Under the law Glover can still be put in prison for the rest of his life if he is found to be intellectually disabled. He just canít be executed.

    Neidigh said that Glover had one IQ test that graded him as intellectually disabled and two others that put him right at the margin of error between intellectually disabled and below average intelligence. A fourth test had him grade out at below average intelligence.

    All four tests were taken before Glover was arrested for Allenís murder. Glover refused to meet with Neidigh or take another IQ test.

    Neidigh said he based his opinion on the previous IQ test and Gloverís school and mental health records, which suggest he struggles with adaptive functioning.

    Earlier this month prosecutors called clinical psychologist Greg Prichard, who said Glover is not intellectually disabled.

    Neidigh said heíd examined Prichardís report and didnít understand how Prichard could say with authority that Glover definitely wasnít intellectually disabled. Glover also refused to meet with Prichard, and the clinical psychologist based his opinion on the fact that school officials didnít believe Glover was disabled and by examining letters that Glover has written to Cooper and family members.

    Glover also attempted to fire his attorney, assistant public defender Michael Bateh, but Cooper refused to dismiss the lawyer.

    Glover has attempted to dismiss his lawyer multiple times, but Cooper has ruled that thereís no reason to remove Bateh, and also said she wasnít sure Glover is competent to represent himself.

    When the hearing began Friday, Glover refused to sit next to Bateh, an empty chair was between them for most of the hearing, but did allow Bateh to speak to him near the end.

    Glover said he found the 51-year-old Allen, who lived two doors down from him, dead in her home and went to get help from some of his neighbors. He told police he saw two men fleeing and then found her door cracked open with Allenís body inside.

    She had been beaten, strangled and stabbed in the neck. The jury that convicted Glover recommended he be put to death by a 10-2 vote.

    Glover allowed his shoes to be photographed and tested for DNA. He was arrested a month after the May 2012 murder when police found Allenís blood on his shoes and his DNA on her face, neck and left hand.

    http://jacksonville.com/news/crime/2...ller-concludes
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    Jacksonville man sentenced to death for 2012 murder of 51-year-old neighbor

    It took a month to arrest him for the crime and it took 20 months between conviction and sentence, but Friday, Dennis Thurnado Glover was sent to Death Row for the murder of Sandra Jean Allen.

    Glover, 51, showed no emotion Friday when Circuit Judge Mallory Cooper told him that the brutal murder of Allen, also 51, justified his death.

    “You have not only forfeited your right to live among us,” Cooper said. “But under the laws of Florida you have forfeited your right to live at all.”

    Allen had been beaten, strangled and stabbed in the neck before she died. Assistant State Attorney John Guy said a death sentence was justified because of the brutality of the crime and the pain and suffering Allen went through.

    Cooper agreed, and in imposing her sentence she specifically referenced the injuries Allen suffered. She was stabbed about 12 times, had her throat cut and strangled to the point that her voice box and bones in her neck broke.

    Allen’s friends and relatives fought back tears as Cooper described the violence she endured.

    Glover, who was Allen’s neighbor, said he found her dead in her home and went to get help from neighbors.

    He told police he saw two black men fleeing and then found her door cracked open with Allen’s body inside.

    He allowed his shoes to be photographed and tested for DNA.

    Glover was arrested a month after the May 2012 murder when police found Allen’s blood on his shoes and his DNA on her face, neck and left hand.

    Lawyers for Glover said their client and Allen were having an illicit sexual relationship, which is why his DNA was on her, but they denied he was responsible for the crime.

    The claim that Glover and Allen were lovers visibly angered Allen’s friends and family members, and in her sentencing order Cooper said the two were neighbors, but didn’t know each other.

    Allen’s supporters said justice was done following the sentencing, but declined further comment.

    Jurors convicted Glover in December 2013 and recommended death that same month by a 10-2 vote. But Glover’s sentencing was repeatedly delayed due to questions over whether he was intellectually disabled.

    Guy said this was the longest he’d ever seen between a conviction and death sentence but pointed out there were unique issues that delayed the case.

    After Glover was convicted the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the state of Florida misunderstood a previous opinion designed to protect the intellectually disabled from execution when the state set a strict IQ standard for Death Row inmates.

    Florida law said people facing Death Row can only argue that they are intellectually disabled if they have an IQ score of 70 or below, not taking into account a margin of error. But the Supreme Court said the state could not automatically declare anyone with an IQ score higher than 70 was not intellectually disabled, and judges have to look at other factors as well.

    Lawyers for Glover have said his IQ is about 72, and questions about whether Glover was intellectually disabled dominated the case for a year.

    The state and defense called dueling mental-health experts at a hearing, with the prosecutors’ expert saying Glover had below-average intelligence but wasn’t intellectually disabled and the defense expert arguing that Glover was disabled.

    In Friday’s ruling Cooper found that Glover was not disabled. She also cited Glover’s previous criminal history in imposing death.

    Glover has previously been convicted of attempted armed robbery and multiple aggravated assaults in Georgia. In one 1992 case Glover was convicted of assaulting a woman with a wrench and causing serious bodily harm.

    Assistant Public Defender Michael Bateh asked Cooper to delay sentencing him Friday. Florida’s death-penalty procedures are being challenged in a case now going to the U.S. Supreme Court, so Bateh argued that the sentencing should be delayed until after a ruling comes down.

    Afterward Bateh said he thought both the Supreme Court case and the question of whether Glover was mentally disabled were important issues that would be raised on appeal.

    Glover’s sentence will get an automatic review from the Florida Supreme Court. The 2nd Circuit public defender in Tallahassee was appointed Friday to represent him in that appeal.

    Glover is the 23rd person put on Death Row by the office of State Attorney Angela Corey since she took over in January 2009. Corey has put more people on Death Row than any other prosecutor in the state during that time period.

    Of the 23 sent to Death Row, 18 are still there. Four have had their sentences or convictions overturned on appeal, but the State Attorney’s Office is trying to put two of them, Michael Renard Jackson and Randall Deviney, back on Death Row.

    Gregory Larkin committed suicide in May.

    No one from the 4th Judicial Circuit, which makes up Duval, Clay and Nassau counties, has actually been executed since 1993 when when Michael Durocher went to the electric chair for killing and burying his girlfriend and their two young children.

    http://jacksonville.com/news/crime/2...r-old-neighbor

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    Court orders new sentencing for convicted Jacksonville killer

    Pointing to the lack of a unanimous jury recommendation, the Florida Supreme Court on Thursday ordered a new sentencing hearing for a Death Row inmate convicted in the 2012 stabbing and strangulation death of a Jacksonville woman.

    Justices upheld the first-degree murder conviction of Dennis Glover in the slaying of a neighbor, Sandra Allen, but vacated his death sentence.

    The ruling, like numerous others in recent months, was rooted in a 2016 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in a case known as Hurst v. Florida and a subsequent Florida Supreme Court decision.

    The 2016 U.S. Supreme Court ruling found Florida’s death-penalty sentencing system was unconstitutional because it gave too much authority to judges, instead of juries.

    The subsequent Florida Supreme Court ruling said juries must unanimously agree on critical findings before judges can impose death sentences and must unanimously recommend the death penalty.

    In Glover’s case, the jury recommended the death penalty in a 10-2 vote. “(Because) we cannot say that there is no reasonable possibility the Hurst error contributed to the sentence, the error in Glover’s sentencing is not harmless beyond a reasonable doubt,” the court majority said in Thursday’s opinion.

    http://jacksonville.com/news/metro/2...onville-killer

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