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Singapore - Page 6
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Thread: Singapore

  1. #51
    Senior Member CnCP Addict Bobsicles's Avatar
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    Im gonna be honest, Singapore is the last place Id ever want to commit a crime in. Being beaten bloody with a cane scares me more than being executed

  2. #52
    Moderator Ryan's Avatar
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    Malaysian man was handed down a death sentence Friday via Zoom in Singapore

    Punithan Genasan, a 37-year-old Malaysian, received the death sentence for his role in a 2011 heroin transaction

    A man has been sentenced to death in Singapore via a Zoom video call for his role in a drug deal, in the first case in the city-state where such a decision has been delivered remotely.

    Punithan Genasan, a 37-year-old Malaysian, received the sentence on Friday for his role in a 2011 heroin transaction, court documents showed, with the country under lockdown to try and curb one of the highest coronavirus rates in Asia.

    "For the safety of all involved in the proceedings, the hearing for Public Prosecutor v Punithan A/L Genasan was conducted by video conferencing," a spokesperson for Singapore's Supreme Court said in response to Reuters' questions, citing restrictions imposed to minimise the spread of the virus.

    It was the first criminal case where a death sentence was pronounced by remote hearing in Singapore, the spokesperson added.

    Genasan's lawyer, Peter Fernando, said his client received the judge's verdict on a Zoom call and was considering an appeal.

    While rights groups have criticised the use of Zoom in capital cases, Fernando said he did not object to the use of video conferencing for Friday's call since it was only to receive the judge's verdict, which could be heard clearly, and no other legal arguments were presented.

    California-based tech firm Zoom did not immediately respond to a request for comment made via its representatives in Singapore. The Attorney General's Chambers, the public prosecutor, referred Reuters news agency's questions to the Supreme Court.

    'Inherently cruel and inhumane'

    Many court hearings in Singapore have been adjourned during a lockdown period that started in early April and is due to run until June 1, while cases deemed essential have been held remotely.

    Singapore has a zero-tolerance policy for illegal drugs and has hanged hundreds of people - including dozens of foreigners - for narcotics offences over past decades, rights groups say.

    "Singapore's use of the death penalty is inherently cruel and inhumane, and the use of remote technology like Zoom to sentence a man to death makes it even more so," said Phil Robertson, deputy director of Human Rights Watch's Asia division. HRW has also criticised a similar case in Nigeria where a death sentence was delivered via Zoom.

    Countries with recorded executions for drug-related offences include China (which classifies figures as a state secret), Iran, Saudi Arabia, Indonesia and Singapore.

    Singapore also retains the mandatory death penalty, in certain circumstances, for murder and drug trafficking, contrary to international safeguards and restrictions on the use of the death penalty.

    According to Amnesty International, two persons were executed in Singapore for drug-related charges in 2019, while two others were hanged after being convicted of murder.

    "This case is another reminder that Singapore continues to defy international law and standards by imposing the death penalty for drug trafficking and as a mandatory punishment," Amnesty's death penalty adviser Chiara Sangiorgio said in a statement. "This must end now. At a time when global attention is focused on saving and protecting lives in a pandemic, the pursuit of the death penalty is all the more abhorrent."

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/...044841246.html
    "How do you get drunk on death row?" - Werner Herzog

    "When we get fruit, we get the juice and water. I ferment for a week! It tastes like chalk, it's nasty" - Blaine Keith Milam #999558 Texas Death Row

  3. #53
    Senior Member CnCP Legend Mike's Avatar
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    Bobsicles you aren't Malaysian so they won't hang you. I doubt they would cane an American.

    As usual here are the court records on this case. He's Malaysian so they will probably hang him in a couple of years.

    That you, PUNITHAN A/L GENASAN, on 28 October 2011, in Singapore, together with one V Shanmugam a/l Veloo and Mohd Suief bin Ismail, in furtherance of the common intention of you all, did traffic in a Class A controlled drug listed in the First Schedule to the Misuse of Drugs Act (Cap. 185,2008 Rev. Ed.) ("the Act"), to wit, that on 12 October 2011, at the West Coast McDonald's carpark you had introduced the said V Shanmugam A/L Veloo to one Mohd Suief Bin Ismail to facilitate an impending drug transaction, and pursuant to this meeting between the three of you, on 28 October 2011, V Shanmugam A/L Veloo, acting under your direction, came into Singapore driving a motor vehicle JLT8467 and met up with Mohd Suief Bin Ismail, and V Shanmugam A/L Veloo did have in his possession, with your knowledge and consent, 10 packets of granular/powdery substance which were analysed and found to contain not less than 28.50g of diamorphine, which is a Class A controlled drug listed in the First Schedule to the Act, for the purposes of trafficking in the said controlled drug with Mohd Suief Bin Ismail, and the possession and intended transaction of the said controlled drug was without authorisation under the said Act or the Regulations made thereunder, and you have thereby committed an offence under section 5(l)(a) of the Act read with section 5(2) of the Act and section 34 of the Penal Code (Cap 224, 2008 Rev Ed), and the offence is punishable under s 33(1) of the Act.

    The accused last entered and left Singapore on 12 October 2011. During the course of investigations, Shanmugam implicated the accused as being the mastermind behind the drug transaction on 28 October 2011. Investigating Officer Assistant Superintendent Xie Junhao thus applied for a warrant of arrest for the accusedon 25 February 2014. The accused was arrested in Malaysia on 16 January 2016, extradited to Singapore on 21 January 2016 and arrested by CNB officers at the Woodlands Checkpoint.

    On 28 October 2011, the Couriers trafficked in not less 28.50g of diamorphine in furtherance of their common intention. They were convicted after a joint trial before Choo Han Teck J on 3 February 2015

    Shanmugam was sentenced to life imprisonment and 15 strokes of the cane while Suief was sentenced to death. Their convictions and respective sentences were upheld by the Court of Appeal.

    https://www.supremecourt.gov.sg/docs...ghc-98-pdf.pdf
    Judicial Review isn't in the Constitution.

  4. #54
    Senior Member Member DStafford's Avatar
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    One of those countries caned an American kid. I think he was vandalizing cars? Don’t remember the details but I remember thinking he deserved it!

    -Dawn

  5. #55
    Senior Member CnCP Addict Bobsicles's Avatar
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    Singapore caned an American teenager named Michael Fay for vandalism. Singapore also hanged a British man named John Martin Scripps
    I believe in the death penalty

    ~James Dobson

  6. #56
    Senior Member CnCP Legend Mike's Avatar
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    Caned an 18 year old and hung a Serial killer 25 years ago. WOAH WATCH OUT GUYS.
    Judicial Review isn't in the Constitution.

  7. #57
    Senior Member CnCP Legend JLR's Avatar
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    Singapore would have no problems executing an American. They have executed executed Australians despite huge international pressure so I doubt an American passport would stop them. Frank Amado is currently on Indonesia death row and the US government has done very little to get his sentence commuted. Trumps also praised the drug policies of those countries on several occasions so he wouldn't have much of a leg to stand on should an American be arrested over there.

  8. #58
    Administrator Heidi's Avatar
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    Singapore Sentences A Drug Dealer To Death Over Zoom

    A Singapore court has sentenced a Malaysian drug dealer to death in a trial carried out over the video-conferencing app Zoom, NBC News reports.

    Punithan Genasan, 37, appeared before the Asian city-states Supreme Court to answer for charges of recruiting two couriers to deliver approximately one ounce, or 28.5 grams, of heroin in 2011. The proceedings were carried out over Zoom, as have almost all Singapore court proceedings in the past few weeks, due to the coronavirus pandemic. In this particular case, Genasan was in jail, while his attorney, the prosecutor, and the judge all appeared from their various locations.

    At the hearing, Genasan was sentenced to death by hanging for his crime.

    In Singapore, crimes such as drug trafficking, as well as kidnapping, rape, and use of firearms, carry the death penalty. Indeed, NBC News notes that most sentences of capital punishment in the country are drug-related.

    Human rights groups are calling the sentence of death over video-conferencing inhumane, on top of what they claim is the inhumanity of the death penalty for drug crimes, and on top of the inhumanity of the death penalty in general.

    Phil Robertson, the deputy Asia director of Human Rights Watch, decried the use of video conferencing technology to sentence a man to death.

    Its shocking the prosecutors and the court are so callous that they fail to see that a man facing capital punishment should have the right to be present in court to confront his accusers, Robertson said.

    Similarly, Chiara Sangiorgio, a death penalty adviser for Amnesty International, noted that Singapore is 1 of only 4 countries that imposes capital punishment for drug offenses. Sangiorgio called the death penalty abhorrent during a global pandemic.

    At a time when the global attention is focused on saving and protecting lives in a pandemic, the pursuit of the death penalty is all the more abhorrent, Sangiorgio said.

    Genasans own attorney, Defense lawyer Peter Fernando, however, didnt see any problem with his clients death sentence being delivered via Zoom.

    This has been the arrangement made by the court with essential hearings conducted via Zoom. We have no complaints, Fernando said, noting that he intends to meet with his client in the future to discuss his appeal.

    In the United States, the judicial response to the coronavirus pandemic has been a mixed bag. As previously reported by The Inquisitr, in some jurisdictions, court proceedings have gone on as if nothing has changed, packing defendants into crowded courtrooms to answer for charges of minor things like traffic violations. In other jurisdictions, judges are emptying jails and prisons of people convicted of, or awaiting trial for, non-violent crimes.

    https://thesaxon.org/singapore-sente...er-zoom/27205/
    An uninformed opponent is a dangerous opponent.

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  9. #59
    Senior Member CnCP Legend Mike's Avatar
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    Syed Suhail bin Syed Zin a Malaysian national is scheduled to be executed on Friday for trafficking over 2 kilos of diamorphine.

    https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/j...rug-trafficker

    As usual here is the case.

    On 3 August 2011 at about 9.45pm, officers from the Central Narcotics Bureau (“the CNB”) arrested the accused near the traffic junction of Choa Chu Kang North 7 and Choa Chu Kang Drive.
    They escorted him to Block 686B Choa Chu Kang Crescent where they searched him and found a set of threekeys from his trousers pocket. The accused was then brought up to unit #11-234 (“the flat”) in the same block of flats.

    The CNB officers gained access into the flat using the accused’s keys.

    They also opened the door of the master bedroom using those keys. The accused was the tenant of the master bedroom in the flat. He lived in that bedroom with his girlfriend. The bedroom had a walk-in wardrobe where theaccused stored his belongings.2 When asked if he had anything to surrender ,he pointed to the rightmost shelf above the drawers of the wardrobe, ie, the pigeon hole on the right side of the wardrobe (“the pigeonhole”).

    The following items were inside the pigeon hole:

    (a) A shoe bag which contained a stack of white envelopes,
    numerous empty sachets, the empty box of a digital weighing scale
    and its instruction manual;
    (b) A white metal container (“the bowl”) containing brownish
    granular substance and a metal spoon;
    (c) A dark blue plastic bag containing four plastic packets of
    brownish granular substances; and
    (d) A digital weighing scale, a pair of scissors, a roll of masking tape
    and a red plastic bag which was empty and folded.

    In the hanging compartment of the wardrobe above the pigeon hole (ie, the top right section of the wardrobe), there were a red plastic bag which contained one small packet of brownish granular substance, one small packet of brownish powdery substance, one stained metal spoon and four used syringes and their plastic wrappers. A grey plastic bag containing two plastic packets was also found on the floor near the master bedroom door. The substances inside the bowl and the four packets inside the dark blue plastic bag weighed about 2.21kg. They were analyzed by the Health Sciences Authority (“HSA”) and found to contain at least 38.84g of diamorphine(hereafter referred to as heroin) in total. The bowl contained at least 7.80g of heroin while the four packets contained at least 10.96g, 8.10g, 4.36g and 7.62gof heroin. The heroin in the five exhibits formed the subject of the trafficking charge.

    https://www.supremecourt.gov.sg/docs...ghc-08-pdf.pdf
    Judicial Review isn't in the Constitution.

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